Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams

Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams

FPSY 2003 – Human Development: Adulthood♦

(5 cr.) Adulthood represents a rich developmental experience that includes a number of important life transitions. In this course, students are introduced to the key theories and applications of adult development. Topics include the social, biological, and cognitive maturation processess that define development through adulthood into older age, and specific transitions including career, love and relationships, and retirement. Cross-cultural issues in development are explored.  (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001, PSYC 1002, or PSYC 1003). Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.
♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

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FPSY 2005 – Social Influences on Behavior♦

It has been said that no person is an island; meaning, in part, that people are influenced by others and by the social situations in which they find themselves. This course focuses on the basic concepts and applications of social psychology, and includes such topics as attitudes, beliefs, and behavior; stereotyping; prejudice and discrimination; interpersonal relationships; group behavior; and the effect of environmental stress on behavior. Students apply principles learned in case studies and to situations in daily life. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001, PSYC 1002, or PSYC 1003).
♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 2009 – Personality♦

    (5 cr.) This course provides an introduction to the major theories of personality and their contemporary relevance. It discusses key personality theorists including those who represent psychoanalytic, neopsychoanalytic, trait, biological, humanistic, cognitive, behavioral, and social-learning approaches to understanding personality. This course also explores how race, gender, and cultural issues play a part in the study of personality and personality assessment.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • FPSY 2101 – Introduction to Forensic Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) This course explores a wide range of adult, juvenile, family, and community topics of interest to students, practitioners, and administrators. Topics include the uses of psychological assessments in court, issues of criminal responsibility, criminal profiling, predicting dangerousness, jury processes and decision making, eyewitness testimony, the use of psychological knowledge in prisons, and the psychology of criminal behavior.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 3003 – Methods in Psychological Inquiry♦

    (5 cr.) The interpretation of what is experienced can be influenced by a variety of factors that cloud judgment. In this course, students learn about research methods used to test hypotheses in an objective and systematic way to minimize biases, which results in drawing better conclusions. Topics include correlation vs. experimental methods, validity and reliability, dependent and independent variables, qualitative vs. quantitative research, and statistical vs. clinical prediction. Students conduct a simple experiment and write up the results using American Psychological Association (APA) format. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001, PSYC 1002, or PSYC 1003, and STAT 3001). Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 3004 – Psychological Disorders♦

    (5 cr.) “Diagnosing” friends and family members is a common occurrence, as are discussions of what is considered normal and abnormal behavior. Students in this course are introduced to psychological disorders that form the basis of diagnosis in psychology. Topics include the concept of “normal” and “abnormal” as related to psychology; introduction to methods used in the process of diagnosis; measurement of psychological functioning; diagnosis; and an introduction to common disorders and their causes, including mood, thought, anxiety, substance abuse, sexual, personality, and dissociative disorders. Students differentiate among disorders and understand limits to effective diagnosis as well as apply what they have learned to case studies. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001, PSYC 1002, or PSYC 1003).
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 4102 – The Criminal Mind♦

    (5 cr.) What makes the criminal unique? Criminal justice professionals confront criminal behavior in many forms. This course explores theories and research that provide cognitive, behavioral, and psychological explanations of criminal behavior. Knowledge of these theories enhances the student’s ability to interact effectively with offenders.  (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001).
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 4111 – Forensic Interviewing and Investigation♦

    (5 cr.) The basic procedures for interviewing both witnesses and suspects are provided in this course. Students have the opportunity to learn the difference between accusatory and non-accusatory interview strategies. In addition, effective behavioral observation strategies are identified. Methods for effectively recording information from interviews and observations are covered, and best practices for preparing forensic reports are presented.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 4112 – Forensic Assessment♦

    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the basic knowledge and skills required to select appropriate assessment instruments used in the field of forensic psychology with children and adults. Types of assessments include child custody evaluations, juvenile assessment, expert witness assessment, fitness to stand trial, civil commitment assessment, and substance abuse assessment.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 4920 – Capstone

    This course provides students with the contemporary knowledge needed to apply ethical practice and professional responsibilities while working in the field of forensic psychology. The American Psychological Society’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct as well as the American Psychology–Law Society’s Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology are mainstays in this course. Additionally, the various roles and responsibilities of a forensic psychologist are covered.

  • FPSY 5101 – Introduction to Forensic Psychology

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an expansive overview forensic psychology, including basic tenets, practices, and procedures. Students explore subspecialties of forensic psychology; roles and responsibilities; and related legal, ethical, and diversity issues. They learn how forensic psychology links to the criminal justice system as they explore related topics, including criminal profiling, police psychology, psychology in the criminal courts, and correctional psychology. Through this course, students acquire a broad understanding of forensic psychology theories and concepts, which they apply to the analysis of controversial issues and contemporary challenges within the field.

  • FPSY 5115 – Understanding Forensic Psychology Research

    (5 cr.) This course aims to help the student better understand how to be an astute consumer of forensic psychology research. Basic principles of statistics, such as reliability and validity, are covered. At the same time, this course places emphasis on teaching the student how to critically read forensic psychology research and how best to apply research results to forensic clinical, correctional, court, public policy, and police settings. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • FPSY 5125 – Assessment in Forensic Psychology Settings

    (5 cr.) Professionals in forensic psychology use assessments to gather data from different sources to arrive at conclusions and make decisions involving cases or issues. In this course, students examine assessments in various areas, including violence risk potential, competency to stand trial, insanity, pathology, and child custody. They examine the varied assessment instruments and procedures used in forensic settings with adults and juveniles. They also assess factors impacting assessments and related challenges, such as ethical issues and multicultural considerations. Students are provided with a foundation in the knowledge of forensic assessment rather than specific skills in administering forensic assessment instruments and interpreting results. Students demonstrate their knowledge as they apply concepts presented in the course to assess a forensic situation case study.

  • FPSY 5135 – Criminal Behavior

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with a foundation in historical and contemporary biological, psychological, and sociological theories of criminal behavior. Students consider two important questions in forensic psychology: “Who is a criminal?” and “Is criminal behavior a mental illness?”  Students explore theoretical issues that result from attempts to explain criminal behavior in forensic populations. They examine groups of offenders, including mentally disordered offenders, sex offenders, violent offenders, and juvenile offenders. Students apply ethical guidelines and standards to the study and research of criminal behavior. They also use concepts and theories to assess the behavior of criminal offenders in case study scenarios.

  • FPSY 5145 – Ethical Issues and Professional Responsibilities in Forensic Psychology

    (5 cr.) A fundamental responsibility of forensic psychologists is to provide treatment, assessment, research, and training in an ethical manner. Through this course, students have the opportunity to acquire contemporary knowledge needed to apply ethical practice and professional responsibilities while working as forensic psychologists. Students explore the various roles and responsibilities of forensic psychologists. They examine the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct as well as the American Psychology-Law Society’s Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology. Students apply these guidelines as well as critical-thinking and scholarly writing skills to describe the ethical dilemmas, professional challenges, and approaches to overcome these issues within a professional forensic psychology role of their choice.

  • FPSY 5511 – Treatment of Forensic Populations

    (5 cr.) In this course, students gain the foundational knowledge necessary to evaluate and subsequently treat many different forensic populations, such as sex offenders, substance abusers, and white-collar criminals. Students analyze the use of traditional forms of intervention, including individual and group psychotherapy, as well as recent developments in intervention, such as restorative justice. Applying concepts and theories learned in the course, students develop a project scenario in which they feature an offender and describe treatment approaches as well as related ethical, legal, and multicultural factors that may impact treatment. Reflecting on the course, students also consider and discuss professional identity and goals.

  • FPSY 5720 – Abnormal Behavior

    (5 cr.) Understanding the characteristics and causes of atypical thoughts and actions—commonly known in mental health professions as abnormal behavior—is essential in determining accurate diagnoses, answering forensic referral questions, and planning effective treatment programs. In this course, students examine the history and evolution of abnormal psychology and how practitioners use contemporary diagnostic criteria of abnormal behavior in various settings, such as schools, rehabilitation facilities, community agencies, and forensic situations. They examine specific techniques for the diagnosis, assessment, and/or treatment of cognitive, emotional, and developmental disorders, as well as for psychophysiological and psychosocial problems. Using the scholar-practitioner model, students consider environmental and biological factors contributing to behavioral disorders. Students also investigate and discuss current and future trends, legal and ethical issues, and multicultural factors that complicate diagnosis and clinical assessment.

  • FPSY 6001 – Foundations for Graduate Study

    (1 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals, and they develop a program of study, a professional development plan, and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. They engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence.

  • FPSY 6101 – Introduction to Forensic Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an expansive overview forensic psychology, including basic tenets, practices, and procedures. Students explore subspecialties of forensic psychology; roles and responsibilities; and related legal, ethical, and diversity issues. They learn how forensic psychology links to the criminal justice system as they explore related topics, including criminal profiling, police psychology, psychology in the criminal courts, and correctional psychology. Through this course, students acquire a broad understanding of forensic psychology theories and concepts, which they apply to the analysis of controversial issues and contemporary challenges within the field.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

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FPSY 6115 – Understanding Forensic Psychology Research♦

(5 cr.) Forensic psychologists, and others in the field, often rely on psychological research for a variety of functions; for example, to extract empirical data about psychological tests or to determine the efficacy of different interrogation techniques. Through this course, students work toward becoming astute consumers of forensic psychology research, acquiring skills needed to understand and interpret data. Students assess the relevance of research as well as the significance of incorporating ethics into practice. They examine basic principles of statistics, such as reliability and validity. Students also learn how to critically read forensic psychology research and how best to apply research results to forensic situations in clinical, correctional, court, public policy, and police settings.
♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6125 – Assessment in Forensic Psychology Settings

    (5 cr.) Professionals in forensic psychology use assessments to gather data from different sources to arrive at conclusions and make decisions involving cases or issues. In this course, students examine assessments in various areas, including violence risk potential, competency to stand trial, insanity, pathology, and child custody. They examine the varied assessment instruments and procedures used in forensic settings with adults and juveniles. They also assess factors impacting assessments and related challenges, such as ethical issues and multicultural considerations. Students are provided with a foundation in the knowledge of forensic assessment rather than specific skills in administering forensic assessment instruments and interpreting results. Students demonstrate their knowledge as they apply concepts presented in the course to assess a forensic situation case study. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • FPSY 6135 – Criminal Behavior♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with a foundation in historical and contemporary biological, psychological, and sociological theories of criminal behavior. Students consider two important questions in forensic psychology: “Who is a criminal?” and “Is criminal behavior a mental illness?”  Students explore theoretical issues that result from attempts to explain criminal behavior in forensic populations. They examine groups of offenders, including mentally disordered offenders, sex offenders, violent offenders, and juvenile offenders. Students apply ethical guidelines and standards to the study and research of criminal behavior. They also use concepts and theories to assess the behavior of criminal offenders in case study scenarios.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6145 – Ethical Issues and Professional Responsibilities in Forensic Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) A fundamental responsibility of forensic psychologists is to provide treatment, assessment, research, and training in an ethical manner. Through this course, students have the opportunity to acquire contemporary knowledge needed to apply ethical practice and professional responsibilities while working as forensic psychologists. Students explore the various roles and responsibilities of forensic psychologists. They examine the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct as well as the American Psychology-Law Society’s Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology. Students apply these guidelines as well as critical-thinking and scholarly-writing skills to describe the ethical dilemmas, professional challenges, and approaches to overcome these issues within a professional forensic psychology role of their choice.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6245 – Social Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students use the lens of social psychology to examine both social cognitions and social behavior—nearly all phenomena that pertain to the individual in society. Students will explore the topics of perceptions, attitudes, relationships and attraction, the motivation to help others, prejudice and aggression, conformity and obedience, group behavior, and the influence of culture, and consider how knowledge of these topics can be used to effect positive social change. The application of what students learn in this course culminates in a final project in which they develop a plan for using social psychology research to address a significant social problem. Moreover, their learning in this course will extend to their personal and professional life, and truly enable the student to effect positive social change as a scholar-practitioner committed to doing so.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6305 – Statistics I♦

    (5 cr.) Psychology practitioners use statistics in a variety of professional undertakings, such as creating studies to assess human behavior or deciding which treatment approaches are most effective for a specific client. Students in this course are provided with a thorough analysis of basic descriptive and inferential statistical methods commonly used in the social sciences. Students work toward developing the skills with which to write, analyze, and critique social science research. They learn various methods, including computation and analysis of frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, and statistical hypothesis testing. Students also examine statistical tests (and underlying assumptions), including z-score; single-sample, independent-sample, and related-sample t-tests; analysis of variance; correlation, regression; and chi-square tests. This course also provides students with an introduction to the SPSS statistical software package. Note: To register for this course, please contact the Academic Advising Team.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6310 – Research Design♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students have the opportunity to build a foundation in the design of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches to psychological research. Students learn the strengths and limitations of each method and under what circumstances each approach would be the most appropriate research design. They also learn the importance of scholarly writing as well as how to identify a topic for research and how to conduct a literature search. Students gain hands-on practice developing a research proposal through which they address key elements, such as collecting and analyzing data, writing an introduction, stating a purpose for the study, identifying research questions and hypotheses, using theory, and defining the significance of the study. Additionally, students consider the legal and ethical issues associated with human subjects’ protection. (Prerequisite(s): FPSY 6305.) Note: To register for this course, please contact the Academic Advising Team.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6311 – Quantitative Analysis♦

    (5 cr.) There are five major traditions of qualitative research methodology commonly used in psychology practice: phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, biography, and case study. Through the context of each of these traditions, students in this course examine varying approaches to proposal planning, research design, data collection, data analysis, aspects of quality and verification, ethical and legal issues, and interpretation and presentation of results in the narrative report. Students work toward gaining the knowledge and skills to design a qualitative research project that could serve as the foundation for thesis or dissertation work. (Prerequisite(s): FPSY 6305 and FPSY 6310.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6314 – Program Evaluation Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams

    (5 cr.) The skills required to assess research and work effectively with stakeholders are among the many proficiencies required of professionals who evaluate and develop programs. In this course, students examine these skill sets as well as the history, theory, and major approaches underlying program evaluation. Students learn how to select appropriate quantitative and/or qualitative models and techniques to perform evaluations, demonstrate program effectiveness, and disseminate results. Additionally, students explore the procedures and techniques involved in offering their evaluation services to a specific group or organization. They also examine strategies to gain stakeholder interest in developing appropriate standards, research progress, and evaluation outcomes. Students acquire practical experience evaluating a program of interest through which they outline organizational structure, identify stakeholders, employ evaluation models, explain steps in planning, and predict possible challenges or stakeholder fears, for which they recommend solutions. (Prerequisite(s): FPSY 6305 and FPSY 6310.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6331 – Interviewing and Observational Strategies♦

    (5 cr.) Personal attitudes, values, and beliefs often affect a counselor’s ability to establish an appropriate relationship and rapport with clients. In this course, students learn to evaluate their personal attitudes and beliefs to positively influence their counseling approaches. They explore principles and skills related to interviewing and observation, and they examine related legal, ethical, and cultural issues. Students gain practice in conducting interviews, making behavioral observations, collecting and interpreting data during an interview, and developing written reports of findings. Synthesizing concepts, skills, and personal reflections, students demonstrate their ability to engage in a counseling session using techniques learned throughout the course. Note: This course also requires that students have access to a video recording device, a tripod, and an audio recording device, which they will begin using the first week of class.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6393 – M.S. in Psychology Capstone

    (5 cr.) Students are provided with the opportunity to synthesize knowledge and skills acquired throughout their program into a practical project designed to promote positive social change in a capstone project. During this course, students work on a capstone project in which they complete a major integrative paper on a topic related to their specialization, incorporating theoretical and practical knowledge as well as social scientific research skills acquired throughout the program. The instructor may approve other capstone projects presented by students.

  • FPSY 6511 – Treatment of Forensic Populations

    (5 cr.) In this course, students gain the foundational knowledge necessary to evaluate and subsequently treat many different forensic populations, such as sex offenders, substance abusers, and white-collar criminals. Students analyze the use of traditional forms of intervention, including individual and group psychotherapy, as well as recent developments in intervention, such as restorative justice. Applying concepts and theories learned in the course, students develop a project scenario in which they feature an offender and describe treatment approaches as well as related ethical, legal, and multicultural factors that may impact treatment. Reflecting on the course, students also consider and discuss professional identity and goals.

  • FPSY 6512 – Juvenile Justice, Delinquency, and Development♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students focus on the various aspects of the juvenile justice system and the population that it serves. As such, the course provides students with an overview of development theories, such as biological, cognitive, social-emotional, and social. Students apply these theories to cases of juvenile delinquency to determine appropriate prevention, treatment, and intervention strategies. They examine juvenile justice codes, case law, and effective methods for reporting offenses. Students also explore the changing landscape of the juvenile justice field based on current research of its population. Using theories presented in the course, students develop a delinquency-prevention or treatment program for their community, focusing on the underlying goal of social justice and change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6520 – Psychology in the Courts♦

    (5 cr.) Forensic psychology professionals play a vital role in the court system, providing consultation, expert testimony, and recommendations for treatment. In this course, students have the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills used by forensic psychology professionals working in the courts. Students examine major roles of psychology professionals, their responsibilities, and required proficiencies, such as oral and written communication skills. Through application-based exercises, students engage in practical exercises, such as in writing reports, planning evaluations, and preparing witnesses for testimony. Students also consider contemporary challenges, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of technology on courts in the United States.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6521 – Police Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn about the various roles and responsibilities of forensic psychology professionals working with and in police departments, the structures and organizations in which they work, and the skills needed to perform daily functions, such as counseling and supporting police. Students analyze and discuss common issues and challenges, including crisis situations, psychological risks of police work, and stress management. They also explore less common roles of psychology professionals working with police, such as training in hostage negotiations and the selection of special officers (SWAT, snipers, and tactical commanders). Engaging in assignments designed to provide application of content, students gain practical insight on a variety of topics, such as diversity issues and training, community impact, and forensic psychology operations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6530 – Forensic Applications in Community Settings♦

    (5 cr.) Professionals must devote considerable attention to forensic psychology perspectives and approaches to address issues such as the overpopulation of prisons; decrease in healthcare availability; and cases in which courts remand treatment in community settings. Students in this course examine forensic psychology theories and perspectives, and then they apply these concepts to various community settings. They engage in practical assignments and topical readings that focus on working with offenders upon re-entry to the community and offenders who receive nonincarceration community placements. In addition, students explore less-common applications, such as restorative justice and community crime prevention. They also analyze the impact of personal perspectives and setting on the application of forensic psychology.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6700 – Psychology and Social Change

    (5 cr.) In this course, students analyze and evaluate theories of social and personal change. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application assignments focused on power and social inequalities, ethnic inequalities, global environment, and issues related to gender and sexism, such as homophobia. In addition, students examine the impact of social change theories on children, families, and societies. They explore the concepts of change agent and change advocate as well as the role of the psychologist as change agent. Students also engage in an integrative written assignment to synthesize theories and analyze a current social problem in their community, for which they propose an action to address the issue and drive positive social change.

  • FPSY 6720 – Abnormal Behavior♦

    (5 cr.) Understanding the characteristics and causes of atypical thoughts and actions—commonly known in mental health professions as abnormal behavior—is essential in determining accurate diagnoses, answering forensic referral questions, and planning effective treatment programs. In this course, students examine the history and evolution of abnormal psychology and how practitioners use contemporary diagnostic criteria of abnormal behavior in various settings, such as schools, rehabilitation facilities, community agencies, and forensic situations. They examine specific techniques for the diagnosis, assessment, and/or treatment of cognitive, emotional, and developmental disorders, as well as for psychophysiological and psychosocial problems. Using the scholar-practitioner model, students consider environmental and biological factors contributing to behavioral disorders. Students also investigate and discuss current and future trends, legal and ethical issues, and multicultural factors that complicate diagnosis and clinical assessment.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6723 – Multicultural Counseling♦

    (5 cr.) Students are provided with the opportunity to increase their knowledge of multicultural counseling and the delivery of psychological services as well as related skills needed in professional practice. Students explore diversity and identity issues and discuss their impact on the therapeutic relationship. They examine the application of traditional theoretical orientations and current multicultural theories to culturally diverse groups. Through a variety of assignments designed to provide practical application of content, students also investigate counseling concepts related to race and ethnicity, sex and gender, sexual orientation, social class, age, and ability. (Prerequisite(s):Counseling Residency I.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6728 – Substance Abuse Counseling♦

    (5 cr.) The impact of substance abuse on the lives of people with addictions, and the lives of their families, makes for a highly complex and challenging area of mental health counseling. Counselors working with these individuals must possess a comprehensive understanding of the background, controversies, and current approaches in regard to the treatment of substance abuse. In this course, students examine psychological aspects of addictions involving alcohol, prescription medications, and illegal substances. They also examine current research in the field of dependency and addiction. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application-based assignments on diagnosing patients, choosing among models of treatment, planning treatment, using group and family treatment plans, and ensuring treatment efficacy. They also consider strategies to promote change, including the trans-theoretical model of behavior change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6740 – Disaster, Crisis, and Trauma♦

    (5 cr.) There is no shortage of natural and human-made disasters, such as war, violence, genocide, and terrorist activities. Individuals and communities impacted by such disasters often need assistance from professionals who understand the social, cultural, and psychological complexities of crisis and trauma. Students in this course investigate how these incidents impact the psychology of individuals and groups. They assess traditional and current literature and complete practical exercises to learn about theories of trauma; actions and behaviors following a disaster; stress, coping, and adjustment difficulties; psychological disorders (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder); and available resources to deal with trauma. Considering the various ways crisis professionals can promote positive social change, students devote special attention to the importance and development of culturally appropriate, service-delivery programs and interventions for individuals affected and traumatized by disasters.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6741 – Psychology of Terrorism♦

    (5 cr.) Many sources define terrorism as a type of psychological warfare, as it induces fear and feelings of vulnerability. Therefore, professionals need to understand all aspects of terrorism to help prevent further terroristic acts and respond to victims who have been affected psychologically. Students in this course explore terrorism from a psychological perspective. They examine types of terrorism; contributing factors related to the development of terrorists and terrorist organizations; counterterrorism agencies and laws; the impact of terrorist events on individuals, families, and communities; prevention, intervention, and postvention with survivors; media coverage of terrorist events; human rights and ethical issues; and future trends related to the psychology of terrorism. Students also examine the threat of terrorism in their own community and evaluate the potential impact. Using concepts presented in the course, they consider applications for preventative measures as well as strategies to promote resiliency among individual and families who may become victims of terrorism.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6742 – Conflict, Conflict Resolution, and Peace♦

    (5 cr.) Through this course, students engage in a study of conflict, conflict resolution, and peace from psychological and social psychological perspectives. Students examine the concept of conflict and methods of addressing it, including management, resolution, and transformation; theories related to conflict resolution; approaches to conflict resolution, including negotiation and third-party interventions; and social psychological factors that influence conflict and conflict resolution. They also consider the influence of culture in conflict and conflict resolution; the role of ethics; intractable and international conflicts; the concept of peace; and how third-party approaches can contribute to the peace process. Students apply conflict resolution approaches to conflicts at all levels, from interpersonal to those involving whole nations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6743 – Psychopharmacology

    (5 cr.) Psychologists working in psychopharmacotherapy are responsible for having in-depth knowledge of psychiatric disorders and psychotropic medications prescribed to treat these disorders. Students in this course are provided with an overview of the spectrum of psychotropic medications and their use in the treatment of mental and behavioral disorders. Students explore the role of the psychologist in prescribing medication and the efficacy of combining medication and psychotherapy. They also engage in discussions focused on the treatment of depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, obsessive-compulsive behavior, schizophrenia, and childhood disorders; and other psychological disorders as described in the DSM-IV-TR. Students practice scholarly writing skills in APA style through a final research paper on a topic of interest related to psychopharmacology. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6225.)

  • FPSY 6785 – Prevention: Research and Practice♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students prepare for their roles as counselors in areas of prevention, intervention, and consultation with specific populations in different settings. Students assess these three areas of mental health counseling, including the relationships among them, methodological applications, and related ethical and legal considerations. They also discuss a variety of topics with their peers, such as applications for social change, needs of specific populations, iatrogenic harm, professional approaches and challenges, program evaluation, and future trends. Using an action-research model, students develop a blueprint for a project to address a contemporary mental health issue through the context of prevention, intervention, or consultation.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6785 – Prevention: Research and Practice♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students prepare for their roles as counselors in areas of prevention, intervention, and consultation with specific populations in different settings. Students assess these three areas of mental health counseling, including the relationships among them, methodological applications, and related ethical and legal considerations. They also discuss a variety of topics with their peers, such as applications for social change, needs of specific populations, iatrogenic harm, professional approaches and challenges, program evaluation, and future trends. Using an action-research model, students develop a blueprint for a project to address a contemporary mental health issue through the context of prevention, intervention, or consultation.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6810 – Community Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) Through collaborative research and action, community psychologists work to enhance the well-being of individuals and community by understanding how communities function on many different levels. Students in this course explore the fundamental concepts and practice of community psychology. They examine guiding values and assumptions of the field, basic ecological concepts, and models of intervention. Evaluating traditional and topical research, students explore diversity in community psychology, strategies for social change, primary and secondary prevention, community mental health, empowerment, stress, and resiliency. They also have the opportunity to assess and discuss their personal and professional experiences, values, and cultural background and consider how these factors are likely to influence their work as community psychologists.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6912 – Mental Health Law♦

    (5 cr.) Mental health counseling professionals in all areas, especially criminal forensic psychological practice, may encounter various conflicts regarding psychological and legal approaches to treatment. Therefore, it is important for counselors to have a firm understanding of mental health law to avoid conflicts, such as issues of liability and malpractice. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to examine several different aspects of the law related to mental health issues, including those constituting forensic psychological practice, such as civil matters (personal injury and civil competency issues) and criminal matters (competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, diminished capacity, and death-penalty issues). Students employ recent court decisions and laws, such as the Tarasoff ruling, mandated reporting, and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), to examine how mental health law influences the practice of psychology and mental health counseling.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • FPSY 6915 – Field Experience

    (5 cr.) Students engage in a 12-week practical field experience at a site specific to students’ degree program and their anticipated employment setting or service population. Students work a specified amount of time on site, interact with peers, and share their experiences and perspectives. Gaining hands-on, practical experience, they apply concepts and theories learned throughout the program to the responsibilities encountered in their field experience setting.

  • GEOG 1001 – World Regional Geography♦

    (5 cr.) This course is designed to introduce students to the geographic method of inquiry used to examine, describe, explain, and analyze the human and physical environments of the major regions of the world. Topics include spatial and geographic perspective, as well as cultural, organizational, and environmental properties of geography. Upon completion, students will be able to identify the human and physical features that give uniqueness and diversity to world regional patterns on Earth’s surface.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HINF 6100 – Introduction to Health Informatics

    (3 sem. cr.) This course is a broad historical, technological, and theoretical framework for the study of health informatics. Students consider the past, present, and future of this rapidly evolving discipline, and they explore the critical issues and challenges within the field as well as potential applications, benefits, and opportunities for improving the management of healthcare through information technology. They explore a variety of related topics, including the development of virtual and interactive healthcare through technology; the interoperability, standardization, safety, and risks associated with the implementation of the electronic health record; the emergence and adoption of new information technologies; and a global perspective of trends and issues in the field. Students investigate the professional roles related to managing health information technology as well as organizations that promote health informatics. They conduct an in-depth investigation on a specific health informatics position to learn the responsibilities, essential skills sets, and professional and educational requirements of the job.

  • HINF 6115 – U.S. Health System♦

    (3 sem. cr.) The structure and function of the U.S. healthcare delivery system consists of multiple components, including policies, programs, and organizations. Healthcare professionals must understand how these components integrate and affect the access, cost, quality, and safety of health services. In this course, students explore the components of the system, including patients, organizations, healthcare professionals, public and private third-party payers, regulators, reimbursement, and technology as well as the continuum of health services, such as hospital systems and services, including ambulatory care, long-term care, wellness and prevention, and community and public health. Engaging in written-application assignments, students gain a practical understanding of factors and challenges linked to the delivery and management of services, including the U.S. health policy-making process, quality and patient safety initiatives, expenditures and sources of funds, among others.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HINF 6130 – Information Systems Management

    (3 sem. cr.) An effective healthcare information system is one that provides value by addressing the requirements of an organization and the needs of the individuals who will use the system. Such a system requires knowledgeable, ongoing management at each step within the complex process. Students in this course explore the technical aspects of information systems management, including key issues of systems design and development as well as system support and maintenance. Focusing on the systems development life cycle (SDLC) approach, students analyze and describe necessary steps in the cycle, such as identifying and selecting appropriate systems technology and data standards, creating requirements, evaluating security, and accommodating human factors in design and use. Additionally, students learn terminology, functions, and standards as well as the basics of information architecture and systems infrastructure.

  • HINF 6145 – Nature, Structure, and Representation of Health Information

    (3 sem. cr.) Consistency in health data standards and appropriate identification and selection of these standards is important for many reasons, including supporting electronic data interchange and enhancing interoperability across information systems. Students in this course explore and discuss these concepts, including the structure of medical and health information through effective knowledge representation as well as the practice of knowledge management and the incorporation of evidence-based best practices. Students examine the diverse vocabularies, terminology, ontology, acronyms, coding, and classification systems employed by information systems users and by those who design and maintain the systems. They also consider related topics, such as data communication, the development and advancement of eHealth technologies, and future federal initiatives to digitalize health data. Students sharpen their critical-thinking and written-communication skills through case scenarios to distinguish among standards, an explication of the most commonly used clinical classification systems, and a multi-stage scenario focused on improving patient health through standardized representations of health information.

  • HINF 6160 – Legal, Regulatory, and Ethical Issues♦

    (3 sem. cr.) The nature of healthcare imposes a host of legal, regulatory, and ethical considerations for which providers and organizations must be aware. Students in this course are provided with an overview of these considerations. Students explore state, federal, and international privacy laws and regulations as well as the government agencies and regulatory bodies charged with creating and upholding these laws and regulations, devoting particular consideration to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996. Applying course concepts, students complete application-based assignments through which they consider key topics, including privacy, confidentiality, licensing, liability, compliance, accreditation, and professional ethics. Students also examine the impact of information technology on patient safety and the potential opportunities and risks of electronic health record systems.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HINF 6175 – Quality Assessment and Improvement♦

    (3 sem. cr.) Healthcare organizations increasingly are concerned about providing high quality and safe services. Students in this course are introduced to the basis for quality and patient safety and provides an overview of healthcare quality, methods of assessing quality, and techniques for improving quality. They can learn key terminology and concepts, including defining quality care; measuring quality in terms of the structure-process-outcomes model; distinguishing between clinical and customer service quality; identifying techniques to avoid adverse clinical events; and exploring customer service quality in terms of defining, measuring, and improving patient satisfaction. Students also explore and discuss the roles of governmental agencies in promoting and reporting quality information regarding hospitals and other health organizations, accrediting bodies, and recent performance initiatives of government and private payers. They apply course concepts to current issues of improving clinical and service quality in healthcare organizations, with special consideration of the 5 Million Lives Campaign—a national effort initiated by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement designed to improve medical care in the United States.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HINF 6190 – Project Management♦

    (3 sem. cr.) Through this course, students work toward gaining the knowledge and skills to implement a health information technology solution through the systems development life cycle (SDLC) using Project Management Institute-defined processes drawn from the Institute’s Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) guide. Within the context of recognized PMBOK-project management standards, students learn to assess organizational need and readiness for a health information system, to engage in strategic and tactical planning for that technology, and to apply critical-path analysis. Students also explore preparation of the request for proposal (RFP) and evaluation of vendor responses as a part of an overall health information technology project management process. Through an integrative, collaborative project, students engage in a hypothetical health information technology project in which they develop a project schedule and charter, apply project management principles and concepts, work though project challenges, and reflect on lessons learned as part of their project closeout.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HINF 6205 – Research Methods and Quantitative Analysis♦

    (3 sem. cr.) Healthcare professionals often rely on research to make informed decisions on critical issues affecting programs, policy, and practice. In this course, students examine the logic underlying scientific research; study design; sampling; identification of variables; methods of data collection and analysis; concepts in measurement, including reliability and validity; program evaluation; and research ethics. They explore numeric methods for data description; the Donabedian model of program evaluation; data modeling and research; data mining; and information system assessment. Through statistics software exercises, students learn basic research methods, strategies, and skills for presentation of research results; they also become familiar with statistical software used to support research. Note: There is a special technology requirement for this course for accessing required interactive tutorials. PC: Students using a PC platform must have a minimum of Windows 2000, Internet Explorer 6.0, and 1GB of RAM. Mac: Students using a Mac platform must have a minimum of an Intel® Mac with OS X version 10.4.11, 1GB of RAM, and Windows 2000. Mac users who do not already have Windows 2000 on their Macs must purchase one or two Mac add-ons from an outside vendor to access the interactive tutorials. For details on which adds-ons to purchase and how to purchase them at discount pricing, please contact a member of Walden’s Student Support Team at 1-800-925-3368 or 1-612-925-3368, option 2.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HINF 6220 – Leadership, Organizational Behavior, and Change Management♦

    (3 sem. cr.) The structure of healthcare organizations is complex and unique, and the behaviors within these organizations often have a direct impact on their success. Students in this course examine organizational behavior as well as the roles and responsibilities of management within healthcare organizations through the macro (organization-wide) perspective and micro (individual and team performance) perspective. Students also focus on understanding organizational values, mission, and vision; management and leadership principles to help navigate change; and effective delivery of services in an increasingly global environment. Students also learn and apply theories of organizational design, governance, and alternative organizational structures, and they consider the theory and practice of managing individuals and groups through motivation, communication, teamwork, leadership, organizational change, coalition building, negotiation, and conflict management and resolution. Through group assignments and personal assessments, students work toward developing self-awareness and effective management styles and strategies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HINF 6235 – Healthcare Information Technology Business and Finance♦

    (3 sem. cr.) Through this course, students learn key business and financial aspects of developing health information technology solutions, and they analyze the technological impact on patient safety and healthcare liability. They explore functions of analyzing the cost benefit of health information technology, assessing the return on investment (ROI) of implementing an information technology system, engaging in vendor evaluation and negotiations, and facilitating the acquisition of health information technology systems with consideration of global opportunities. Students also engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of course concepts, including financial scenarios through which they perform monetary value calculations. Additionally, students explore human resources management issues; expand on their knowledge of project management, delving deeper into the request for proposal process; and reflect on information technology industry trends that will impact the future of healthcare delivery and access.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HINF 6950 – Practicum

    (3 sem. cr.) The practicum provides an opportunity for students to apply and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the M.S. in Health Informatics program of study and further develop key professional competencies. Students engage in a supervised field experience, which they align to their academic and professional goals. Supervision by an on-site preceptor involved in the planning or conduct of a clinical research study is a critical component of the practicum. The on-site supervisor and the course instructor monitor and evaluate students’ performance throughout the entire practicum experience. Students are required to complete 120 hours of practicum work. They must also participate in an accompanying online seminar course and begin to develop an ePortfolio based on assigned professional development activities.

  • HINF 6960 – Scholarly Project

    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course are provided with an opportunity to demonstrate mastery of the principles, concepts, and content addressed throughout the M.S. in Health Informatics program of study. Students choose from a selection of overarching themes and topical areas reflecting the breadth of subjects covered in the program. Guided by their faculty advisor, students identify a particular area of interest and produce a substantive written paper and presentation in an area of health informatics. Students also engage in group discussions through which they consider their career development plan, share information on their paper topic and process, and exchange feedback on project presentations.

  • HIST 2005 – World History 1900–1945♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the history of the modern world from 1900 to 1945. Students explore and discuss major historical events and global conflicts that shaped the development of the world from the Era of Imperialism through the end of World War II. Through assignments designed to provide practical application of course content, students compose short essays on such topics as the essential elements to make a nation thrive, such as political policies and alliances; the impact of culture and technology on society; and the strengths and weaknesses of monumental historical documents. Students in this course learn to use a historical perspective to evaluate global events and key changes that shaped the first half of the 20th century.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HIST 2006 – World History 1945–2000♦

    (5 cr.) This course introduces students to the history of the contemporary world from 1945 to 2000. They explore and discuss major historical events that shaped the development of the world from post-World War II decolonization through the post-Cold War era. Students consider elements introduced in this era, such as scientific advancements, technological innovations, and political policies, and then they write about the elements that they believe are most important in influencing contemporary life. Students also learn to use a historical perspective to evaluate global events and key changes that shaped the second half of the 20th century.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 1000 – Concepts of Health Promotion♦

    (5 cr.) Initiatives to prevent illness and promote healthy lifestyles are often more effective and cost efficient than efforts to intervene or treat disease, which is why health promotion is an increasingly popular trend in the field of healthcare. In this course, students formulate a definition of health and discuss the many influences that shape our individual and collective perceptions of health. Students consider the health-wellness continuum, including a number of factors, such as behavioral, demographic, psychological, and social forces. They also examine evidence-based methodologies for interventions to promote health and enhance wellness, and they evaluate health information found online to determine credibility and accuracy. Additionally, students reflect on ways to shape their future career in health and to promote positive change.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 1005 – Context of Healthcare Delivery♦

    (5 cr.) Effective advocacy through politics, policy, and professional associations is one method of improving healthcare delivery in the United States; however, effective advocacy depends on individuals who fully understand current issues, systems, existing policies, and related contexts. In this course, students engage in a systems-level analysis of the implications of healthcare policy on issues of access, equity, affordability, and social justice in healthcare delivery. They examine legislative, regulatory, and financial processes relevant to the organization and provision of healthcare services. Students also assess the impact of these processes on quality and safety in the practice environment and disparities in the healthcare system.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 2110 – Behavioral and Cultural Issues in Healthcare♦

    (5 cr.) Many factors influence the health behavior and wellness of individuals and populations. Understanding these factors helps healthcare professionals reduce health disparities and address healthcare access issues for vulnerable populations. Students in this course examine the cultural and behavioral factors and issues that influence the management and delivery of healthcare services. Students develop a framework for assessing the effect of culture and behavior in a variety of settings and situations. They identify health disparities attributable to diverse cultural and behavioral factors and discuss their implications for healthcare policy. Students also engage in application-based writing assignments to further examine the goals and objectives of addressing health disparities as well as obstacles for confronting vulnerable populations.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 2115 – Aging Across the Lifespan♦

    (5 cr.) This course provides students with an overview of the effects of aging on health and development across the entire human lifespan. Students examine the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive milestones in childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age, with a particular emphasis on the significant changes that occur toward the end of life. Students engage in weekly discussions on various scenarios related to socioemotional development as well as on topics such as attitudes on aging, environmental risk factors, and cognitive development. Demonstrating knowledge and synthesizing course concepts, students critically analyze a specific socioemotional issue and explain how it manifests in the various developmental stages.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 2120 – Health Informatics♦

    (5 cr.) Health professionals often use information technology to make important clinical and managerial decisions related to services and processes in healthcare. Students in this course examine information technology that supports the collection, storage, retrieval, and communication of data; information systems safeguards; ethical and legal issues; and information management to promote patient safety and quality of care. They also explore information literacy, basic hardware and software concepts, and fundamental software applications, including spreadsheets and healthcare databases. Applying course concepts, students plan for the development of a database, explain their chosen database design, and describe potential challenges in implementing their system. Students also have the opportunity to review and analyze current events about health topics addressed in the course.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 3100 – Ethical and Legal Issues in Healthcare♦

    (5 cr.) The nature of health services, such as personal evaluations, clinical research, invasive surgeries, and end of life care, facilitates a host of ethical and legal considerations of which professionals must be aware. In this course, students examine the legal and ethical issues that are fundamental to the practice of healthcare and the conduct of health-related research. They explore a historical overview of events and milestones that have shaped the contemporary regulatory landscape. They also investigate and assess issues of privacy and confidentiality, informed consent, licensing, and malpractice, among others. Additionally, students consider ethical, decision-making models for assuring the quality, safety, and appropriateness of healthcare and services. They also apply ethical principles and legal considerations to real-world scenarios.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 3105 – Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Healthcare♦

    (5 cr.) This course introduces students to a patient-centered interdisciplinary model for healthcare delivery in which individual practitioners collaborate as members of a team. The benefits of such an approach for patients and providers with emphasis on improved outcomes will be examined. Potential obstacles and institutional barriers such as delineation of responsibilities, reimbursement, and licensing are also considered.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 3110 – Current Issues in Healthcare Policy and Practice♦

    (5 cr.) This course will examine major issues in acute and long-term healthcare policy and practice from the perspective of the patient and the provider. Topics include access, affordability, insurance, quality, safety, and technology. Special consideration will be given to the social, institutional, economic, and regulatory contexts in which services are delivered.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 3115 – Public and Global Health♦

    (5 cr.) The course is designed to provide an overview of public and global health issues that transcend national borders, class, race, ethnicity, and culture. The role of the healthcare provider in preserving and promoting health among diverse populations is discussed. Students will consider global health and their role in health promotion, protection, and maintenance, and in illness prevention of targeted populations. Principles of epidemiology and the influencing sociopolitical factors that impact health and well-being are explored.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 4000 – Introduction to Healthcare Management♦

    (5 cr.) This course presents management concepts and theories designed to influence and improve the performance of healthcare organizations. The external and internal environments of organizations are identified, as well as key management functions, roles, and responsibilities. Essential aspects of healthcare management are addressed.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 4050 – Introduction to Disaster and Emergency Management♦

    (5 cr.) The United States needs more professionals to become skilled in building disaster resilient communities to effectively respond to natural and human-caused catastrophes including acts of terrorism. This course provides an introduction to the historical development and evolution of disaster and emergency management. It addresses the roles and responsibilities of local, regional, and national agencies, as well as interagency coordination and collaboration. Students examine the planning, preparedness, response, and recovery phases of disaster and emergency management. They also discuss the public health system’s role in critical events such as outbreaks of infectious disease, natural disasters, industrial emergencies, and terrorist and bioterrorist attacks.

  • HLTH 4100 – Healthcare Organization Theory and Behavior♦

    (5 cr.) This course focuses on the theories of behavior of healthcare organizations at the macro (organization-wide) level and micro (individual and team performance) level. Factors that influence an organization’s behavior, as well as performance, including the role of culture, group processes, and interactions are considered. (Prerequisite(s): HLTH 4000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 4105 – Healthcare Finance and Economics♦

    (5 cr.) This course provides the foundations for economic evaluation and financial management in delivery of healthcare services, including principles of supply and demand. The purpose and methods of financial reporting, such as financial statements and balance sheets, are explained. Financial risk and insurance principles and mechanisms for healthcare reimbursement, including Medicare, Medicaid, and other payor programs are presented. The course also explores the financial, political, and economic aspects of universal healthcare. (Prerequisite(s):HLTH 4000, and ACCT 1003 or MATH 1030.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 4110 – Healthcare Quality and Safety♦

    (5 cr.) This course focuses on major quality and safety issues within healthcare organizations. Methods of assessing quality and techniques for improving quality are considered, as well as opportunities for preventing adverse and never events with attention given to the 5 Million Lives Campaign. Current requirements for reporting indicators of quality and pay-for-performance initiatives to reward quality are addressed. (Prerequisite(s): HLTH 4000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 4115 – Strategic Planning and Marketing in Healthcare♦

    (5 cr.) This course presents key concepts related to strategic planning, including the relationship of the plan to the organization’s mission, values, and vision. Students will be introduced to assessment techniques and methodologies for evaluating the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT analysis) for a healthcare organization. The relationship between strategic planning, marketing, and organizational performance will be considered. (Prerequisite(s): HLTH 4000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 4120 – Managing the Healthcare Workforce♦

    (5 cr.) Healthcare organizations are able to provide quality care to patients only when their workforce is productive, satisfied, organized, and well-trained. Organizations rely on the human resource (HR) department to provide employees with support, while focusing on the needs and goals of the organization. Students in this course explore and discuss the role of HR in healthcare organizations as related to the recruitment, retention, and management of the healthcare workforce. They examine workforce development models, employee benefits, and compensation strategies. Students also explore methods used by HR professionals to develop goals and expectations for evaluating employee performance and promoting effective employee relations, and they investigate HR problem-solving strategies, such as conflict resolution, collective bargaining, and arbitration methods. Through application-based activities, students analyze effective development of position descriptions; assess practices of hiring based on organizational fit; gain real-world insight on strategies of successful organizations; and develop plans for attaining long-term professional goals.
    (Prerequisite(s): HLTH 4000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 4200 – Principles of Epidemiology

    (5 cr.) This course focuses on the principles governing the study and practice of epidemiology. Consideration is given to the various methods available to health professionals for selecting and measuring factors of interest, describing their distribution, detecting associations, and identifying populations at risk. The features, advantages, and limitations of common epidemiologic research designs are addressed. (Prerequisite(s): MATH 1002/1030 or STAT 3001.) Note: Students who wish to pursue graduate school should consider taking STAT 3001 in addition to MATH 1002.

  • HLTH 4205 – Introduction to Research Methods and Analysis

    (5 cr.) This course examines the basic components required for the conduct of health-related research and provides students with the analytic tools needed to understand and assess research methods described in the scientific literature. Basic research methods are described, including surveys, observational studies, experimental and quasi-experimental design, use of primary and secondary data, and statistical techniques for analyzing and interpreting data.

  • HLTH 4300 – Personal Health and Wellness♦

    (5 cr.) This course is an introduction for students to the essential factors that promote or challenge the development of personal health and healthy lifestyles, including nutrition, physical fitness, stress management, mental and emotional health, sexuality and relationships, violence and injury, and substance abuse. Students examine how cultural and socioeconomic factors influence people’s perception of their health as well as their health behavior. Students review tools for assessing health and risk and have the opportunity to assess their own health and behavior using a health risk appraisal.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 4320 – Nutrition Across the Lifespan♦

    (5 cr.) Human nutritional requirements change over the course of the lifespan. This course examines the fundamentals of nutrition and the variation of nutritional needs at different life stages, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age. Students discuss issues such as obesity and eating disorders as well as the link between diet and disease. Students conduct a personal dietary assessment and analyze the relationship between food choices and health status in their own lives.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 4340 – Fit and Well: Core Concepts in Exercise Science♦

    (5 cr.) Physical fitness is an important component of overall health and quality of life. In this course, students focus on the fundamental concepts and principles of physical fitness, including flexibility, cardiovascular health, muscular strength, muscular endurance, and body composition as well as the physiological and psychological processes through which exercise influences health. Students create a personalized fitness program and explore the health advantages of a physically active lifestyle, including the mental, social, and psychological benefits. They also examine the harmful effects of a sedentary lifestyle, particularly with regard to the risk of chronic disease.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 4360 – Stress Management and Wellness♦

    (5 cr.) This course presents a holistic approach to stress management. It addresses the emotional and physical dimensions of stress as well as their scientific foundations and physiological pathways. Students explore the mind-body connection, and they study fundamental principles, theories, and relaxation techniques—including cognitive and physical behavior change interventions—that can help people effectively manage personal stress. Students also discuss related topics such as anger management, conflict resolution, anxiety, and time management.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 4380 – Strategies for Health Communication and Wellness♦

    (5 cr.) The principles and theories of health communication and their application to health promotion and behavior change are the foci of this course. Students examine how to design and deliver health messages to various audiences while remaining sensitive to cultural, socioeconomic, and educational factors influencing the audience. Students evaluate important dimensions of intercultural and intracultural communication and study how to make scholarly writing accessible to the general population. They also explore the use of emerging technologies and social media in marketing and communications.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 4900 – Capstone

    (5 cr.) The capstone provides an opportunity for students to synthesize the knowledge and skills gained from the program of study through a written paper or project. (Prerequisite(s): All prior health core and concentration courses completed. This course must be taken in the student’s final quarter.)

  • HLTH 6005 – Perspectives on Health and the Developing Professional

    (5 cr.) This course covers the origins and evolution of the concept of health, including some of the important health problems that face the world today and emerging concerns for the future. This foundational course introduces learners to key events in history as well as some of the health systems and issues that a modern health practitioner may encounter. Strategies for success as a graduate level scholar and a health practitioner are integrated in a way that provides meaningful context to learners. Students discuss key concepts with peers and the course culminates with a reflection paper designed to help learners evaluate their professional goals and how to progress as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Students explore careers in various public health and health education settings and experience a virtual health department in order to learn about various functions and personnel.

  • HLTH 6030 – Socioecological Perspectives on Health♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students will identify and discuss social and ecological perspectives of public health including individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, societal, and public policy factors. Students will explore the socioecological model (SEM) and other theoretical frameworks to prevent morbidity and reduce mortality from major causes of disease. The range of topics are primarily centered on the U.S.; however, recognizing the growing need to understand how disease impacts the global community, international settings will also be explored to deepen the understanding of public health perspectives. Students will apply these frameworks and other theories presented in the course to address current public health problems and reduce health disparities. Students will demonstrate their understanding of SEM through researching and describing a specific health issue in their/a community, discussing contributing factors, and proposing an appropriate intervention. They will also share ideas and perspectives and provide feedback to peers through discussion forums.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 6031 – Public Health Administration and Leadership♦

    (5 cr.) This course provides students the foundational understanding of the administrative, managerial and organizational practices of public health and health care delivery systems.  Students examine theories of leadership as well as the professional attributes, skills, styles, and strategies required to advance public health goals. They engage in a variety of contextual and practical assignments focused on management theories, policy processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. Students also consider the impact of global trends on public health practice, policy, and systems.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 6051 – Diversity, Human Rights, and Social Justice

    (5 cr.) This foundation course broadly addresses race and ethnicity, socioeconomic status and class, culture, religion, gender, sexual orientation, ability and disability, and environment in an effort to better understand social identity. Throughout this course, students will benefit from course assignments, discussions, and course materials that address the role of power and privilege and oppression and marginalization on the development of clients. Students will specifically focus on activities that help them recognize systems that support or foster power inequities, oppression, and underutilization of human talent and skills. In addition, students will engage in self-awareness activities that foster their understanding of their role in the hierarchy of power and privilege. At the completion of this course, students will understand the importance of social workers developing competence in providing evidence-based contextually and culturally relevant assessments and interventions for individuals, families, groups, and communities.

  • HLTH 6100 – Critical Issues in Emergency Management♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the theories and concepts underpinning contemporary emergency management and how to understand the phenomena of natural and human-caused disasters. Students examine the historical context of emergency management, the general process of risk assessment, the emergency management cycle, communications within emergency management and crisis planning, and the general policy and legal framework surrounding the process of emergency management in the United States with a focus on the National Incident Management System (NIMS). Case studies of major catastrophes are used to explore contemporary and practical hazard management. Students can complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute courses IS-100.b – Introduction to Incident Command System and either IS-800.b – National Response Framework: An Introduction or IS700.a – National Incident Management System as part of this course. Nationally recognized certificates are awarded for successful completion of FEMA courses.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 6110 – Exploring Health Education in the 21st Century♦

    (5 cr.) What does it mean to be a health educator in the 21st Century? Students in this foundation course explore the field of health education: historical milestones, current issues, and future opportunities and challenges. They examine settings for practice, professional competencies, inter-professional collaborations, credentialing, professional organizations, use of technology, and ethical issues pertaining to health education. Students will also analyze current issues in the field by reviewing scholarly publications and research pertaining to health education practice. Course assignments also include an introduction to commonly used health education theories and models, and students will have the opportunity to develop a philosophy statement for health education practice in the new Millennium.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 6111 – Leadership and Organizational Change♦

    (5 cr.) Successful public sector organizations require high-caliber leaders who are accountable to multiple constituencies. A rapidly accelerating rate of change and blurring of organizational boundaries contribute to the need for leaders who are equipped to meet the challenge. This course explores the theoretical underpinnings of leadership and the important role of the leader in organizational change. By exploring leadership theory, current research, and practice within an area of public administration or nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations, students will demonstrate their understanding leadership in organizations that are increasingly complex in nature. Ethical dimensions, boundary spanning functions, and how leaders influence positive social change are a key factors of this course. The course draws on historical and current events, and the personal experiences of students, to examine the demands of leadership

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 6112 – Governance and Public Policy♦

    (5 cr.) Democratic principles are the foundation of modern life. The course provides an overview of democratic governance in public administration, public policy, or nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations in modern society. Students will examine the theoretical underpinnings of democratic governance and public policy in their chosen area of specialization necessary for doctoral-level research. Students will review fundamental theories of governance, research current literature on a specialized topic, and apply best practices within the area of specialization. The emphasis is on the context in which public and nonprofit leaders function and the social institutions that influence public policy and guide administrative decision-making.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 6200 – Risk Assessment, Preparedness and Disaster Mitigation♦

    (5 cr.) Risk assessment and mitigation are key components to effective all-hazards emergency management. In this course, students focus on the methods and techniques required to assess a community¿s risk and what measures are needed to protect human life and capital assets. Students can learn ways to evaluate the social vulnerability and identify special needs of populations who may be at greater risk during an emergency or disaster. Students then explore methods to reduce risk and build capacity through preparedness and mitigation techniques. In addition, as part of this course, students complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute course IS-393.a: Introduction to Hazard Mitigation.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 6205 – Assessing Community Needs for Health Education♦

    (5 cr.) It is important for health educators and other health professionals to understand the unique characteristics and health needs of a community in order to provide effective and relevant health education and services. This course will introduce the student to the principles and processes of needs assessment and community capacity-building as a first step in the program planning process. Students will learn about individual, small-group, and community-based assessments as well as quantitative and qualitative approaches.  Students will directly apply what they are reading and discussing in class to their own communities by conducting a assessment unique to their community. Other topics covered include: use of primary and secondary data; selection and development of instrumentation to collect community data; interpretation and analysis of data, and prioritization of  health education needs. Community mapping tools and other technology used in the assessment process will also be explored.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 6207 – Grant Writing♦

    (5 cr.) Grant writing is a highly marketable skill that requires many non-profit, educational and community organizations to secure external funding in order to provide needed services to the community. In this course, students will explore the basic skills needed for grant writing including identifying potential funding sources, creating objectives and a need statement, preparing and justifying a budget, identifying appropriate assessment plans, and writing an executive summary.  Course assignments will allow students to directly apply what they are reading and discussing by writing a full grant proposal based on an actual Request for Proposal (RFP).

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 6245 – Applied Research in Public Health♦

    (5 cr.) Public health professionals use the results of research in many ways, including in the development of programs and interventions designed to enhance the health of communities as well as to demonstrate the efficacy of programs to stakeholders who provide funding. In this course, students will engage in an examination of the research that informs public health programs, policy, and practice.  Specific topics to be covered include study designs, sampling, identification of variables, methods of data collection and analysis, key concepts in measurement (including reliability and validity), program evaluation, and research ethics. As a major assignment in this course, students will engage in an integrative literature review and begin to develop what may become their capstone project.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 6280 – Policy and Politics in American Political Institutions♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the crafts of policymaking and policy analysis in the U.S. democratic system. Students examine the tasks involved in the policy process, including setting agendas, using policy analysis tools, managing the political process, implementing policy, and providing evaluations and feedback. Though this analysis, students work toward developing skills to conduct policy and economic analyses as well as to determine the political feasibility of proposed policies. They learn about regulation as a policy choice. They also work toward enhancing their ability to develop alternatives and to assess strategies proposed to achieve certain policy objectives. Students engage in scholarly-writing assignments and discussions on policy areas of interest, such as communications, immigration, transportation, housing, labor, arts, and environmental policies.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 6300 – Disaster Response and Recovery♦

    (5 cr.) Issues in disaster response are concerned with meeting basic and humanitarian needs of disaster-affected populations. Issues include evacuation, relocation, and tactical and strategic decisions in the immediate aftermath of an emergency episode. Recovery begins once the immediate threat of the emergency wanes and the focus shifts to restoring disaster-affected areas. Students will learn about important federal policies related to disaster response and recovery, including the National Response Framework (NRF), and will gain an understanding of how local, state, and federal policies mesh in response and recovery efforts. Students will complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute course IS208.a ¿ State Disaster Management as part of this course.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 6405 – Ethics and Social Justice♦

    (5 cr.) Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. Leaders face increasingly complex social and political challenges as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. This course explores ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Students use demographic data, current social trends, and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 6412 – Health Education and Communication Strategies♦

    (5 cr.) Effective communication plays a vital role in the diffusion of a health behavior or innovation. This course is designed to introduce the health educator to a wide-range of health communication strategies. Assignments will allow students to apply and evaluate the use of health education delivery methods for various populations and practice settings (i.e., community; clinical;  worksite, global, schools, etc.). Principles and theories of health communication and behavior change will be applied to a variety of health education case studies. Students will also demonstrate how to design and communicate culturally tailored health information to an audience of their choice. They will also explore the use of emerging technologies and social media in delivering and promoting health education.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 6475 – Program Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation♦

    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is on the competencies required of the public health professional in planning for the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of community health promotion and disease prevention initiatives.  Attention is given to needs assessment, logic models and collaboration with stakeholders.  Strategic approaches to planning, implementation, and evaluation with particular attention to study design and sampling are addressed. Health behavior theories are considered in the development of health promotion programs, the application of evaluation findings, and prioritization of community concerns and resources.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 6740 – Disaster, Crisis, and Trauma♦

    (5 cr.) This course defines natural and human-made disasters such as war, violence, genocide, and terrorist activities, and reviews how they impact the psychology of individuals and groups. Topics include theories of trauma; actions and behaviors following a disaster; stress, coping, and adjustment difficulties; psychological disorders (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder); and available resources to deal with the trauma. The course emphasizes the importance and development of culturally-appropriate service delivery programs and interventions for individuals affected and traumatized by disaster(s).

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 6771 – Terrorism: A Systematic Approach for Emergency Preparedness♦

    (5 cr.) This course provides students with an overview of terrorism—local, national, and international—and the need to develop a systemic approach for emergency preparedness. Topics include terrorism and public health, bioterrorism, biosecurity, cyber terrorism, risk assessment, implications for public health, and components of a systemic preparedness infrastructure. Students participate in online discussions and begin the development and/or analysis of a terrorism preparedness infrastructure.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 6800 – Health Education and Promotion Capstone

    (5 cr.) The Capstone course is intended to be taken last in the M.S. Health Education program. It provides students with an opportunity to synthesize knowledge and skills acquired throughout the program by completing a Capstone project focused on social change. The M.S. Health Education Capstone project is designed to empower students with the skills necessary to secure external grant funding through grant proposal writing. Students will integrate theoretical and practical knowledge as well as scientific research to prepare a grant proposal for funding a health education program which addresses a pressing health need in their community.  Emphasis is placed on grant sources and resources, the grant proposal process, grant management, and sustainability.

  • HLTH 6840 – Health Policy and Management♦

    (5 cr.) This course examines the factors that influence and improve health outcomes of individuals and populations, with attention to the goals of Healthy People 2010 and the main components and issues of organization, financing, and delivery of health services and public health systems in the United States. Topics include management theories and processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. The policy process is addressed, as well as the advocacy role of the public health professional in influencing local, state, and federal policy. The impact of global trends on public health practice, policy, and systems is also considered.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 8001 – Foundations of Graduate Study

    (1 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals and develop a program of study and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence.

  • HLTH 8003 – Building a Multidisciplinary Approach to Health

    (2 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and the requirements for successfully participating in an online curriculum, and provided with a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. The focus of course assignments is on the practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and the integration of professional practice with professional and academic excellence as they relate to practice in public health.

  • HLTH 8008 – Foundations for Doctoral Study

    (6 cr.) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. It provides a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Course assignments focus on practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and promote professional and academic excellence. Major assignments include the preparation of the Professional Development Plan, program of study, and a sample KAM Learning Agreement.Note: Students in the KAM- and mixed-model formats are required to take this course immediately upon enrollment and must successfully complete it before proceeding with KAMs or coursework.

  • HLTH 8015 – Administration and Leadership of Public Health Programs

    (5 cr.) Strong, knowledgeable leaders and administrators are important forces behind the policies and programs designed to improve population health. In this course, students examine the administration of population-based health programs and the leadership skills needed to work effectively with diverse workforces and communities under varying political and economic conditions. They explore and discuss a variety of topics, including organizational dynamics, team building, mediation, collaboration, systems thinking and planning, working within political structures, responding to political and economic forces, communicating about public health issues, budgeting, funding proposal development, and grants management. Students engage in an in-depth analysis of leadership, including a self-assessment to determine and reflect on their leadership development, and they apply course concepts and theories to case studies of real-world public health programs and related challenges. They also to develop a program evaluation research proposal to further assess the characteristics of effective programs.

  • HLTH 8031 – Public Health Administration and Leadership

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with a foundational understanding of the administrative, managerial, and organizational practices of public health and healthcare delivery systems. They examine theories of leadership as well as the professional attributes, skills, styles, and strategies required to advance public health goals. Students engage in a variety of contextual and practical assignments focused on management theories, policy processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. They also consider the impact of global trends on public health practice, policy, and systems.

  • HLTH 8050 – Global Health and Issues in Disease Prevention♦

    (5 cr.) An in-depth review of how population-based strategies are used in the prevention of disease and disability is provided to students in this course. Students explore the topics of population health and disease prevention from the perspective of understanding the determinants of health. Using a cross-disciplinary approach, students examine how economics, social factors, health policy, urbanization, globalization, the environment, and other factors influence disease. Students consider how research in disease prevention, health determinants, and population health apply to public and community health efforts.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 8111 – Leadership and Organizational Change

    (5 cr.) Successful organizations in a rapidly changing and complex world require leaders who embrace change and are able to engage others in change. In this course, students use traditional literature, current articles, and interactive media to explore the qualities, characteristics, and skills of effective leaders as well as the theories, models, and relationships between leadership and organizational change. They assess the ethical issues and standards as well as the opportunities and challenges related to leading diverse organizations through change. Students also examine how current leaders employ leadership and organizational change to contribute to social change, and they consider how to use these lessons to make further positive changes within an organization or their own community.

  • HLTH 8112 – Governance and Public Policy

    (5 cr.) Democratic principles are the foundation of modern life. The course provides students with an overview of democratic governance in public administration, public policy, or nonprofit or nongovernmental organizations in modern society. Students examine the theoretical underpinnings of democratic governance and public policy in their chosen area of specialization necessary for doctoral-level research. Students examine the context in which public and nonprofit leaders function and the social institutions that influence public policy and guide administrative decision making. Students also review fundamental theories of governance, research current literature on a specialized topic, and apply best practices as they relate concepts to complete practical application assignments and a final case scenario project.

  • HLTH 8120 – Current Research in Social Change

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8123 – Current Research in Social Change: Health Management and Policy

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8125 – Current Research in Social Change: Health Promotion and Education

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8127 – Public Health Policy, Politics and Progress♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the role of federal, state, and local government in the assurance of public health through health policy and law.  Consideration is given to contemporary policy, law, and regulatory issues arising in public health practice, as well as to the economics and financing of public health programs.  The advocacy, political, and creative process in the formulation, implementation, and modification of health policy are examined and discussed.  Students also learn how to write and structure a health policy analysis.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 8129 – Communications, Marketing, and Public Relations for Public Health Leaders♦

    (5 cr.) An overview of marketing and public relations principles as they relate to public health, highlighting theoretical concepts that are commonly used in health communications research, is provided to students in this course. Topics include using social marketing techniques, promoting health literacy, developing community partnerships, and creating culturally sensitive and appropriate promotional materials. Students focus on using social media to identify and advance public health interests and ethical principles. Through case studies, students examine how they can use marketing practices to translate health research into social action and behavioral change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 8130 – Professional Practice and Social Change

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8133 – Professional Practice and Social Change: Health Management and Policy

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8135 – Professional Practice and Social Change: Health Promotion and Education

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8136 – Leadership, Professionalism, and Ethics in Public Health Practice

    (5 cr.) Critical issues, such as infectious diseases, inadequate healthcare access, and an aging population, require leaders who have a diverse skill set as well as the professional and ethical sensibilities needed to lead efforts that improve quality of life for individuals and communities. In this course, students examine theories of leadership as well as the professional attributes, skills, styles, and strategies required to advance public health goals. They explore ethical choices, values, professionalism, opportunities for advocacy, and the application of principles of social justice implicit in public health decisions and practice. Students learn how to employ collaborative methods for working with and motivating diverse communities and constituencies, and they consider methods and develop new strategies for evaluating and solving current problems in healthcare.

  • HLTH 8175 – Health Policy and Management

    (5 cr.) Methods for influencing and improving health outcomes of individuals and populations are at the forefront of health policy and management. With this in mind, the Department of Health and Human Services launched a national, comprehensive plan—Healthy People 2010—designed to promote health and prevent disease. Students in this course expand on these goals to develop a solid foundation for understanding the need for effective health policy and management and the role of the public health professional charged with influencing local, state, and federal policy. Students identify and assess components of organization, financing, and delivery of health services and systems in the United States. They engage in a variety of contextual and practical assignments focused on management theories, policy processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. Students also consider the impact of global trends on public health practice, policy, and systems.

  • HLTH 8200 – Organizing Community Action for Health Promotion and Education

    (5 cr.) There are many task forces, coalitions, and consortiums in place to promote health and prevent disease. But groups such as these require individuals who know how to effectively organize and lead community-based efforts. Students in this course explore the skills and methods leaders use to organize communities, interagency collaborative efforts, and work sites for collective action regarding health promotion and education. Students analyze risk factors at the community, work-site, local, state, national, and international levels. Using qualitative and quantitative methods, students assess the needs and capacities of communities for health-related initiatives. They also synthesize course content to evaluate an existing collaborative community organization strategy and propose new methods and processes for team building in community health programs. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)

  • HLTH 8210 – Public Campaigns for Health Promotion and Education

    (5 cr.) Healthcare professionals often use communications media and marketing strategies to promote health, reduce risk factors, and influence community leadership to support healthful conditions. In this course, students explore the persuasive use of these strategies in health promotion and education. They examine a variety of topics, including the design of mass media campaigns; target markets; and working with and responding to media, including broadcast, print, the Internet, and other electronic communication media. Applying course concepts as well as analysis and creative skills, students develop and present a media campaign designed to deliver a specific message about a health problem to a select population. Through this project, students gain practical experience critiquing literature, framing health messages, using media to promote a program or message, conducing formative research, applying theories and models, and developing plans. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)

  • HLTH 8215 – Public Health Policy Design and Implementation

    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the application of scientific data in the formulation of policy recommendations as well as the process and function of drafting legislation and ordinances to promote equitable distribution of health resources, healthy living conditions, and other activities to reduce health risk. Students identify and describe various existing initiatives that promote public health policy formulation. They also learn leadership strategies for effective lobbying of decision makers and community leaders. Through an integrative project, students engage in a critical review of a selected program through which they critique professional journal articles, develop their analysis, and engage in review of peer work. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)

  • HLTH 8219 – Health Promotion and Educational Interventions in Diverse Populations

    (5 cr.) Through this course, students explore the planning and organization of health promotion programs for underserved, economically disadvantaged, and underrepresented populations. Students learn to design health promotion programs that consider the social, economic, and medical conditions influencing the health status of diverse populations. Throughout the course, students develop a health promotion project for a specific population, based on the intervention mapping process. Through this project, students analyze and integrate principles of social change and empowerment, summarize research that supports the decision-making process, and critique institutional and social systems. Students also have the opportunity to assess and discuss the future of health promotion, considering projections of needs over the next two decades. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)

  • HLTH 8220 – Current Research in Human Development

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8223 – Current Research in Human Development: Health Management and Policy

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8225 – Current Research in Human Development: Health Promotion and Education

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8230 – Professional Practice and Human Development

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8233 – Professional Practice and Human Development: Health Management and Policy

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8235 – Professional Practice and Human Development: Health Promotion and Education

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8320 – Current Research in Organizational and Social Systems

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8323 – Current Research in Organizational and Social Systems: Health Management and Policy

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8325 – Current Research in Organizational and Social Systems: Health Promotion and Education

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8330 – Professional Practice and Organizational and Social Systems

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8333 – Professional Practice and Organizational and Social Systems: Health Management and Policy

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8335 – Professional Practice and Organizational and Social Systems: Health Promotion and Education

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8381 – Public Policy and Evaluation

    (5 cr.) There are a variety of tools available to policymakers and policy analysts to evaluate the impact of social programs. In this course, students examine these tools and work toward gaining the skills needed to develop plans for evaluation and to assess social programs effectively. Students engage in discussions and assignments designed to provide practical application of content on a variety of topics, such as selecting programs to evaluate, crafting program descriptions, identifying stakeholders and their interests, developing logic models, framing evaluation questions, applying utilization-focused evaluation techniques, using quantitative and qualitative tools to complete formative and summative evaluations, and providing evaluation reports and feedback to decision makers. Using concepts presented in the course, students gain hands-on experience developing an evaluation design for a social program.

  • HLTH 8382 – Public Policy and Finance

    (5 cr.) Public policymakers often rely on microeconomic and macroeconomic models to formulate new policies and reevaluate existing polices. In this course, students examine the use of such models in the public policy setting and assess  how public finance influences policy choices as well as implementation alternatives. Through weekly, analytical writing assignments and peer discussions, students explore tax policies and tax incentive models; budgeting, public/private models; market influences on policy; the impact of government expenditures on income redistribution; and economic considerations of welfare; food stamps, workers’ compensation, social security, and outsourcing of public programs. Synthesizing course content and applying critical-thinking skills, students assess a local government jurisdiction, examine the decisions of policy makers, and recommend improvements based on economic models.

  • HLTH 8392 – The Language of Leadership

    (5 cr.) In today’s complex environment, leaders engaged in shaping public policy must know how to use the emotional as well as the intellectual power of language to motivate, inspire, and competently manage their organizations. In this course, students examine techniques, such as effective communication, used in dynamic leadership that affect conscious and unconscious influences on human behavior. Through discussions, group assignments, and individual projects, students apply theoretical and practical course content to demonstrate the necessary components for making effective human connections. Students also learn why stories, symbols, and metaphors are essential elements in the language of leadership.

  • HLTH 8400 – Public Health Leadership and Systems Thinking♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore leadership models and theories, the core principles of public health leadership, and the application of systems thinking to public health. They examine how to create strategies and solutions that efficiently utilize public health and healthcare resources. Students also discuss descriptive and prescriptive systems, focusing on the application of these processes to current public health issues and challenges at the organizational and community levels.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 8410 – U.S. Healthcare Delivery System

    (5 cr.) Healthcare delivery is one of the largest industries in the United States. Students are provided with the opportunity to gain thorough insight into the current structure and components of health services and delivery; they are also presented with an abbreviated history addressing the nature of population illness and disease. Students identify and describe components of the system, including patients, healthcare professionals, public and private third-party payers, regulators, reimbursement methods, and technology. They engage in activities and discussions focused on the continuum of services related to healthcare, such as hospitals and hospital systems, ambulatory care, and long-term care. Students also explore issues related to these services, such as wellness, prevention, and community and public health, for a comprehensive understanding of the system. Students contextualize their study through the examination of current factors and challenges as well as the impact these challenges have on delivery and management.

  • HLTH 8415 – Organizational Development and Leadership

    (5 cr.) The structure of healthcare organizations is complex and unique, and the behaviors within these organizations often have a direct impact on their success. Students in this course examine organizational behavior as well as the roles and responsibilities of management within healthcare organizations through the macro (organization-wide) perspective and micro (individual and team performance) perspective. Students also focus on understanding organizational values, mission, and vision; management and leadership principles to help navigate change; and effective delivery of services in an increasingly global environment. Students also learn and apply theories of organizational design, governance, and alternative organizational structures, and they consider the theory and practice of managing individuals and groups through motivation, communication, teamwork, leadership, organizational change, coalition building, negotiation, and conflict management and resolution. Through group assignments and personal assessments, students work toward developing self-awareness and effective management styles and strategies.

  • HLTH 8420 – Health Economics

    (5 cr.) Because of the complexity and uncertainty of the healthcare system, as well as the scope of resources consumed by health and health-related organizations, managers must appreciate the economic implications of decisions regarding allocation of resources. Students in this course examine the application of economic principles to managerial decision making regarding the amount, structure, and distribution of healthcare resources and services. Through discussions and application-based assignments, students build on their knowledge of economic principles as they examine the population’s demand for healthcare; the supply of organizations and practitioners; the role of insurance, moral hazard, and adverse selection; the practice of cost shifting; the structure, competitive nature, and dynamics of markets; differing objectives of for-profit and nonprofit organizations; variation in consumer access to and use of services; roles of uncertainty and information asymmetry; strategies for consumer cost sharing; and challenges that healthcare organizations face in pricing, producing, allocating, and distributing health services. Students also devote special attention to understanding how health services differ in a variety of competitive markets.

  • HLTH 8425 – Health Policy

    (5 cr.) The health of individuals as well as access to and delivery of health services in the United States depend on policy makers who make authoritative decisions based on legal standards, carried out at the federal, state, and local levels. Students in this course examine the process for developing and implementing policy at the various levels of the legal system, key stakeholders and interest groups involved in the health policy process, and how U.S. health policy changes over time. They also explore and discuss key health policy initiatives that address health issues in the United States, including Medicare and Medicaid; access to care and the uninsured; disease-specific efforts, such as HIV/AIDS and organ transplantation programs; emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases; terrorism and emergency preparedness; and funding issues associated with health policy. Applying course concepts, students complete practical assignments focused on various topical issues, such as stakeholder influence on the policy-making process, access to insurance and care, and pay-for-performance policies, among others.

  • HLTH 8430 – Healthcare Financial Management

    (5 cr.) This course is an introduction to the terminology, theory, concepts, and techniques used in the accounting and finance functions in healthcare organizations. Students gain an understanding of the important role of finance in healthcare organizations, and they learn various techniques to develop, manage, and control finances. Using an applied approach, students also learn how to develop, apply, and interpret various financial tools, including budgets, sources of revenue/reimbursement by payer, income statements, balance sheets, dashboards, statements of cash flow, pro formas, return on investment analysis, financial ratios, capital budgeting, debt service and borrowing, depreciation, and cost allocation and cost accounting techniques. Additionally, students develop portions of a business/financial plan using these techniques and analyze the viability of their business/financial plan using accepted financial management tools.

  • HLTH 8431 – Finance and Budgeting for the Public Sector♦

    (5 cr.) Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in both public and nonprofit operations. Students in this course examine finance and budgeting concepts, policies, and practices related to organizations as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. They assess theories for motivating major fiscal-policy debates, and they explore and discuss auditing practices, tax systems, financial management, budgetary reform, financial technology systems, the use of dashboards for financial reporting, and the impact of globalization on finance and budget. Students read and analyze budgets, financial statements, and reports. They contextualize their learning as they apply knowledge gained from their analysis to develop a new budget and financial plan for either a public or private organization.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 8435 – Health Law and Ethics

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of law, regulation, and court decisions that affect healthcare organizations, as well as ethical underpinnings and principles that healthcare organizations follow in the delivery of services. Students explore and discuss a variety of topics, including key federal and state laws; regulatory oversight and licensing of facilities and practitioners; credentialing requirements and processes; scope of practice for practitioners; admission and discharge processes; privacy and confidentiality of patient information; patient protection, including advanced directives; organizational liability; conflict of interest legislation; antitrust law; contract law governing relationships with employed physicians and other providers; risk management; and organizational governance issues, among others. Using case studies and hypothetical situations, students assess management roles and key ethical principles and challenges underpinning healthcare organizations.

  • HLTH 8440 – Application of Public Health and Behavior Change Theories♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are presented with a comprehensive look at public health and behavior change theories that apply to community health education. Students review and assess predominant social and behavioral principles at the individual, interpersonal, and community levels. They discuss examples of how others have harnessed social marketing and communication technology to effect positive health behavior change in individuals and communities. Students learn to apply theories to public health research and practice.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 8450 – Community Health Assessment♦

    (5 cr.) Community health assessment and its application to program planning are covered in this course. Students learn to identify and prioritize problems, then assess and utilize community resources to address these problems. Topics include measuring selected determinants of community health status and health services use, classifying community assets, identifying data sources, and applying certain methods to maximize community participation. Students synthesize the results of a community health assessment to create a community diagnosis that serves as the basis for program planning and research design.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 8451 – Public Policy Analysis♦

    (5 cr.) Contemporary public administrators work in a dynamic, partisan environment with unprecedented access to public policy data—conditions leading to extraordinary opportunities and, often times, severe constraints. Students in this course thoroughly examine key stakeholders involved in the public policy process and devote special attention to their function, impact, and constraint on policy development. In addition, students explore professional ethics related to the role of the policy analyst and consider the significant social outcomes of public policy. They examine the theories and strategies used by policy makers and policy analysts to develop, implement, execute, evaluate, and promulgate public policy. They also assess the impact and consequences of public policy and evaluate it though a social justice framework. Using critical-thinking and communication skills, students craft a policy memorandum regarding a current public policy problem, for which they consider and evaluate competing policy alternatives.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 8460 – Health Education and Community Advocacy

    (5 cr.) This course studies the health education policies and interventions of social and behavioral change theories. Course assignments focus on the development of theory-based strategies and emphasize control, participation, efficacy, and empowerment. Topics include partnership models, including media advocacy and marketing strategies.

  • HLTH 8465 – Strategic Planning: Collaboration, Cooperation, and Coordination

    (5 cr.) In an increasingly complex world, leaders and managers in public, private, and nonprofit organizations need to be strategic in planning and creating effective, collaborative programs and services. This course explores the role and process of strategic planning, with an emphasis on collaboration, cooperation, and coordination within and among organizations. Students apply these concepts to real-life situations and organizations.

  • HLTH 8475 – Advanced Program Planning Implementation and Evaluation♦

    (5 cr.) Competency in program design, implementation, and evaluation are promoted in this course. Students are provided with an overview of public health program planning and development, as well as needs and assets assessment. The focus of the course is on the methods required to implement programs and evaluate their efficacy. Students discuss the administration and coordination of public health program interventions and activities, and they explore the variety of methods used to facilitate public health research.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • HLTH 8510 – Health Services in the Contemporary Context

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8513 – Health Services in the Contemporary Context: Health Management and Policy

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8520 – Current Concepts and Methods in Health Services

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8523 – Current Concepts and Methods in Health Services: Health Management and Policy

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8530 – Integrative Professional Practice in Health Services

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8533 – Integrative Professional Practice in Health Services: Health Management and Policy

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8550 – Writing a Quality Prospectus

    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is on the process of writing the doctoral dissertation premise and prospectus. The premise will guide students through their committee selection process. The prospectus will guide students through the stages of writing a dissertation—conducting a literature review, developing a problem statement and research questions, and evaluating research designs, methods, and types of analysis. The premise and prospectus that students write for this course will be for a possible dissertation topic. This exercise is the cornerstone of this course and will prepare students for working with their chosen dissertation topic.

  • HLTH 8610 – Health Services Delivery and Ethical Implications

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8613 – Health Services Delivery and Ethical Implications: Health Management and Policy

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8620 – Health Services Delivery and Ethical Decision-Making

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8623 – Health Services Delivery and Ethical Decision-Making: Health Management and Policy

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8630 – Ethical Theories Applied in Health Services

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8633 – Ethical Theories Applied in Health Services: Health Management and Policy

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8710 – Theories of Case Study Research and Applied Change in Health Services

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8713 – Theories of Case Study Research and Applied Change in Health Services: Health Management and Policy

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8720 – Relating Change Theories to Practice in Health Services

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8723 – Relating Change Theories to Practice in Health Services: Health Management and Policy

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8730 – A Case Study of Applied Change in Health Services

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 8733 – A Case Study of Applied Change in Health Services: Health Management and Policy

    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

  • HLTH 9000 – Dissertation

    (30 cr.) This course sequence offers doctoral students the opportunity to integrate their program of study into an in-depth exploration of an interest area that includes the completion of a research study. Students complete the dissertation independently, with the guidance of a dissertation supervisory committee chair and committee members. Students complete a prospectus, proposal, Institutional Review Board application, and dissertation. Once students register for HLTH 9000, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8100X, 8200X, and 8300X. For the General Program and for the Health Management and Policy specialization, students must first also complete the core KAMs, RSCH 8100X, and RSCH 8200X, and appoint their dissertation supervisory committee. For the Community Health Promotion and Education specialization, students must first also complete two KAMs, RSCH 8100X, RSCH 8200X, and the public health behavioral science foundation courses.)

  • HLTH 9001 – Health Services Dissertation

    (20 cr. minimum—5 cr. per term for minimum 4 terms) In this course, doctoral students have the opportunity to integrate their program of study into an in-depth exploration within an interest area through the completion of a research study. Students complete the dissertation independently, with the guidance of a dissertation supervisory committee chair and committee members. They must also participate in an accompanying online course and complete a prospectus, proposal, Institutional Review Board application, and final dissertation paper and presentation. Once students register for HLTH 9001, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula; appointment of an approved dissertation committee chair.)

  • MMBA 6920 – Health Services Financial Management

    (4 cr.) This course focuses on the functional role of the healthcare finance manager and the basic tools of healthcare financial decision-making. Topics include financial reporting statements, cost concepts and decision-making, budgeting techniques, cost variance analysis, time valuing of money procedures, capital acquisition, debt and equity financing, and working capital cash management.

  • MMHA 5015 – Foundations of Healthcare Administration

    (5 cr.) This course focuses on increasing students’ knowledge and awareness of key contextual and environmental factors affecting the practice of healthcare administration, including the importance of culture, communication, and diversity. It introduces students to stakeholders in the healthcare field in a variety of settings. Key health and medical terms are covered, including basic health, wellness, and disease information. Students develop critical-thinking, as well as written, verbal, and interpersonal communication skills. The professional behaviors, attitudes, goal-setting, and motivation required for success as a healthcare manager are considered. In addition, this course helps students develop the competencies they need for success within an online environment. Students begin developing a portfolio.

  • MMHA 5100 – U.S. Healthcare Delivery System

    (5 cr.) This course helps students understand the structure and components of health services and the health services delivery system in the United States. The components of the system, including patients, organizations, healthcare professionals, public and private third-party payers, regulators, reimbursement and reimbursement methods, and technology are identified and described, including the continuum of healthcare services such as hospitals and hospital systems, ambulatory care services, long-term care services, wellness/prevention services, and community/public health services. In addition, the course provides an abbreviated history of health and health services in the United States and addresses the nature of population illness and disease. Contextual factors and challenges that are linked to the healthcare delivery system are addressed, and the impact of these challenges on the delivery of services and healthcare management are explored.

  • NURS 3000 – Issues and Trends in Nursing♦

    (5 cr.) This course provides students with an overview of the evolution of nursing as a profession and its relationship to the changes in organization, structure, and function of the U.S. healthcare delivery system. Students examine major issues and trends in nursing and healthcare and consider the influence of socioeconomic, ethical, legal, and political variables as well as professional values on contemporary nursing practice. Through weekly discussions, students explore and share personal experiences on contemporary nursing issues, such as the nursing shortage, workforce challenges, diversity, and the professional status of nursing.
    Note: Students must take this course first in their sequence.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • NURS 3001 – Issues and Trends in Nursing

    (5 cr.) This course provides an overview of the evolution of nursing as a profession and its relationship to the changes in organization, structure, and function of the U.S. healthcare delivery system. Major issues and trends in nursing and healthcare are examined with consideration given to the influence of socioeconomic, ethical, legal, and political variables, as well as professional values on contemporary nursing practice.

  • NURS 3005 – The Context of Healthcare Delivery♦

    (5 cr.) Improvement of healthcare delivery in the United States relies on many factors, such as effective nurse advocacy through politics, policy, and professional associations. But advocacy depends on the ability to fully understand current issues, systems, policies, and related contexts. In this course, students engage in a systems-level analysis of the implications of healthcare policy on issues of access, equity, affordability, and social justice in healthcare delivery. They examine legislative, regulatory, and financial processes relevant to the organization and provision of healthcare services. Students also assess and consider the impact of these processes on quality and safety in the practice environment and disparities in the healthcare system.
    (Prerequisite(s): NURS 3000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • NURS 3010 – Information Management in Nursing and Healthcare♦

    (5 cr.) Professionals often use information technology to support clinical and managerial decision making in the field of healthcare. Students in this course explore these information technology applications through a variety of written and practical assignments. They focus on information technology that supports the delivery of services, including the collection, storage, retrieval, and communication of data; information systems safeguards; ethical and legal issues; and information management to promote patient safety and quality of care. Students also share examples of information literacy and discuss why it is important to the practice of nursing. Additionally, students identify basic hardware and software components and explore fundamental software applications, including spreadsheets and healthcare databases.
    (Prerequisite(s): NURS 3005.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • NURS 3015 – Pathopharmacology♦

    (5 cr.) A major responsibility of nurses is to help ensure safe administration of medication by having an in-depth understanding of drug categories and how each type interacts with other drugs in the body. In this course, students explore foundational pharmacologic principles and topics, including key drug actions and interactions, effects of various categories of drugs, and pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Through case studies and other functional applications, students learn about the pathophysiology related to major health problems across the lifespan and the pharmacologic management of those problems. They examine the cellular aspects of disease, pathophysiological signs and symptoms, and dynamics of body defenses. Students also consider pathopharmacological implications in the practice of nursing.
    (Prerequisite(s): NURS 3010.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • NURS 3020 – Health Assessment♦

    (5 cr.) Through this course, students have the opportunity to gain the knowledge and skills required to collect data related to assessment of individual health status. They learn the physical examination skills of inspection, palpation, percussion, and auscultation used to assess major body systems across the lifespan. They gain practical experience using interviewing techniques and communication skills for taking patient histories, and they discuss the psychological, social, and cultural aspects of clinical assessment. Additionally, students consider the integration of data to guide the nursing process and ethical guidelines. Engaging in interactive simulations, students apply knowledge and demonstrate understanding of conducting health assessments.
    (Prerequisite(s): NURS 3015.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • NURS 4000 – Research and Scholarship for Evidence-Based Practice♦

    (5 cr.) Nurses engage in research to stay up-to-date on the changing scope of healthcare as well as new methods and best practices in providing quality care to patients. Students in this course learn the basic elements of the research process. They also learn how scholar-practitioners use these elements to discover new knowledge and models for applying evidence to inform clinical decisions and improve nursing practice and patient outcomes. They consider the ethical conduct of research and scholarly work as well as the nurse’s role in the collection, documentation, analysis, interpretation, dissemination, and utilization of research data. Students apply course concepts as they research a current problem in nursing practice, propose solutions for change, and synthesize literature that supports their proposed changes.
    (Prerequisite(s): NURS 3020.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • NURS 4001 – Research and Scholarship for Evidence-Based Practice

    (5 cr.) This course focuses on the basic elements of the research process in discovery of new knowledge and models for applying evidence to inform clinical decisions and improve nursing practice and patient outcomes. Consideration is given to the ethical conduct of research and scholarly work as well as the nurse’s role in the collection, documentation, analysis, interpretation, dissemination, and utilization of research data.

  • NURS 4005 – Topics in Clinical Nursing♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students learn about the major acute and chronic health problems and leading causes of death across the lifespan, including etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and implications for treatment and disease management. They also explore the relationship of genetics and genomics to health and illness; infection-control issues, such as drug-resistant organisms; accidents or injuries; common geriatric syndromes; palliative and end-of-life care; and complementary and alternative therapies. Students apply course concepts and demonstrate understanding of nursing intervention through the development of an action plan based on best practices and a teaching plan designed to prevent accidents and injuries.
    (Prerequisite(s): NURS 4000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • NURS 4006 – Topics in Clinical Nursing

    (5 cr.) This course highlights major acute and chronic health problems and leading causes of death across the lifespan, including etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and implications for treatment and disease management. Consideration is given to the relationship of genetics and genomics to health and illness, infection-control issues such as drug-resistant organisms, accidents/injuries, common geriatric syndromes, palliative and end-of-life care, as well as complementary and alternative therapies. Development of a framework for nursing interventions is emphasized.

  • NURS 4010 – Family, Community, and Population-Based Care

    (7 cr.) The focus of this course is on application of theories and concepts from nursing and public health sciences in assessing health status and preventing and controlling disease in families, aggregates, and communities as clients. The use of epidemiological and community assessment techniques to examine populations at risk, health promotion, and levels of disease prevention with special emphasis on ethnically diverse and vulnerable populations are incorporated. Major local, state, and national health issues are considered, including mental health and substance abuse and related co-morbidities, re-emergence of infectious and communicable diseases, environmental and occupational health hazards, bioterrorism, emergency preparedness, and disaster response. This course includes a 45-hour virtual, online leadership practicum with no required preceptors or travel.

  • NURS 4011 – Family, Community, and Population-Based Care

    (7 cr.) The focus of this course is on application of theories and concepts from nursing and public health sciences in assessing health status and preventing and controlling disease in families, aggregates, and communities as clients. The use of epidemiological and community assessment techniques to examine populations at risk, health promotion, and levels of disease prevention with special emphasis on ethnically diverse and vulnerable populations are incorporated. Major local, state, and national health issues are considered, including mental health and substance abuse and related co-morbidities, re-emergence of infectious and communicable diseases, environmental and occupational health hazards, bioterrorism, emergency preparedness, and disaster response. This course includes a 45-hour virtual, online leadership practicum with no required preceptors or travel.

  • NURS 4015 – Public and Global Health♦

    (5 cr.) Through this course, students widen their perspectives of promoting health and preventing disease as they examine health issues that transcend national borders, class, race, ethnicity, and culture. Students discuss the role of the nurse in preserving and promoting health among diverse populations as well as their role in illness prevention and health promotion, protection, and maintenance of targeted populations. They also explore principles of epidemiology and the influencing sociopolitical factors that impact health and well-being of humankind. Students engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of content on topical issues, such as infant mortality rates in the United States and abroad, infectious or communicable disease, implications of global climate change on health, among others. Finally, students consider and reflect on the nurse’s role as a leader in transforming the future of the world’s health.
    (Prerequisite(s): NURS 4010.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • NURS 4020 – Leadership Competencies in Nursing and Healthcare

    (7 cr.) This focus of this course is on building the knowledge and key competencies essential to successful leadership and influence in an evolving healthcare delivery system. Students in this course emphasize increasing self-awareness in the context of organizational challenges and individual motivation; distinguishing leadership from management, team building, strengthening interpersonal communication, and interdisciplinary effectiveness; shaping a preferred future for nursing; translating strategic vision into action; as well as developing skills in implementing and managing organizational change. Specific learning opportunities include case studies, a battery of self-assessments and 360-degree feedback instruments, and exposure to top-level leaders in nursing and healthcare, and a 45-hour virtual, online leadership practicum with no required preceptors or travel. (Prerequisite(s): NURS 4015.)

  • NURS 4021 – Leadership Competencies in Nursing and Healthcare

    (7 cr.) This focus of this course is on building the knowledge and key competencies essential to successful leadership and influence in an evolving healthcare delivery system. Students in this course emphasize increasing self-awareness in the context of organizational challenges and individual motivation; distinguishing leadership from management, team building, strengthening interpersonal communication, and interdisciplinary effectiveness; shaping a preferred future for nursing; translating strategic vision into action; as well as developing skills in implementing and managing organizational change. Specific learning opportunities include case studies, a battery of self-assessments and 360-degree feedback instruments, and exposure to top-level leaders in nursing and healthcare, and a 45-hour virtual, online leadership practicum with no required preceptors or travel.

  • NURS 5050 – Policy and Advocacy for Improving Population Health

    (5 cr.) In today’s rapidly changing healthcare delivery system, decisions made within the political arena impact the future of healthcare systems and the populations that healthcare professionals serve. In this course, students examine healthcare reform and its impact on healthcare delivery, population health, and nursing practice. They evaluate policies that influence the structure, financing, and quality in healthcare and examine healthcare delivery from a global perspective. Through discussions, case studies, and other activities, students examine the effects of legal and regulatory processes on nursing practice, healthcare delivery, and population health outcomes. Students also examine ways to advocate for promotion and preservation of population health and gain the necessary skills to influence policy and support changes effected by the passing of new healthcare reform legislation.

  • NURS 5051 – Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Through Technology

    (5 cr.) Evidence-based practice is an essential nurse competency that supports the provision of effective and efficient care. Through team projects and individual applications, students learn how to organize, evaluate, and use health information and knowledge to critically appraise and use information technology to enhance evidence-based practice. Students also apply evidence-based practice to improve advanced nursing practice and healthcare outcomes across organization, public-health, and consumer-health settings.

  • NURS 5052 – Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice

    (5 cr.) Nurses base practice on sound and tested evidence to ensure the safety, high quality, and cost-effectiveness of patient care. This course provides students the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the development and relationship of nursing theory, research, and practice. Through a variety of online activities and coursework, students explore the role of nursing theory in both research and practice. They examine research literature to differentiate and critique various research designs, including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method models; appraise statistical data; and analyze evidence. Acquired knowledge helps students to critically evaluate research to make decisions about use of findings to enhance practice.

  • NURS 5501 – Introduction to Statistics and Applied Research Methods

    (4 sem. cr.) Students in this course are provided with an introductory understanding of elementary statistics for social scientists as well as an introduction to social science research. Statistical methods include computation and analysis of frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, understanding of basic probability, and understanding of the normal curve, as well as conceptual understanding of effect sizes, probability value, and the correlation coefficient. Research methods include understanding basic language associated with research, such as the difference between theory and hypothesis, the nature of variables, and different research designs. Students learn to read research critically. Note: This course is for semester-based master’s-level students.

  • NURS 6000 – Success Strategies in the Master of Science Program in Nursing Online Environment

    (1 sem. cr.) This course introduces students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence as they relate to practice in nursing.

  • NURS 6001 – Foundations for Graduate Study

    (1 cr.) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. The course will also provide a foundation for the student’s academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Course assignments focus on the practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and the integration of professional practice with professional and academic excellence as they relate to practice in nursing.

  • NURS 6006 – Issues and Trends in Nursing

    (4 sem. cr.) An overview of the evolution of nursing as a profession and its relationship to the changes in organization, structure, and function of the U.S. healthcare delivery system is provided in this course. Students examine and discuss major issues and trends in nursing and healthcare. They also consider the influence of socioeconomic, ethical, legal, and political variables as well as professional values on contemporary nursing practice. Students conduct a literature review, which they use to analyze and summarize contemporary diversity issues in the workplace. They also engage in additional application-based assignments on a variety of topics, such as the nursing shortage, professional practice, licensing, and legal and ethical issues.

  • NURS 6010 – Advancing Nursing Through Inquiry and Research

    (4 sem. cr.) Contemporary nursing practice now often involves conducting research to learn the most recent trends and effective practices to treat patients. Students in this course focus on the steps of the research process. They explore qualitative and quantitative methods and gain a foundation for evidence-based practice through inquiry and critical analysis of scholarly literature. Students also examine strategies for using research effectively in a variety of situations. Through a collaborative project, students critically investigate and share information on current nursing issues.

  • NURS 6015 – Information and Healthcare Technologies Applied to Nursing Practice

    (4 sem. cr.) The rise of technological evolution and innovation continues to change approaches and practices in healthcare; therefore, nursing professionals should understand how to harness technology in ways to improve delivery and care. In this course, students learn how professionals use information technologies and systems to support decision making in nursing practice, administration, research, and education. They examine information sources used as tools, such as listservs, the Internet, e-mail, and databases. Students consider advances in technology that support the delivery of services as well as the collection, storage, and retrieval of information. They also examine and discuss ethical and legal issues that impact the use of technology in healthcare. Students engage in a team project through which they assess a current issue in nursing, focusing on the impact of information technology.

  • NURS 6022 – Topics in Clinical Nursing

    (4 sem. cr.) Major acute and chronic health problems and leading causes of death across the lifespan, including etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and implications for treatment and disease management are highlighted in this course. Consideration is given to the relationship of genetics and genomics to health and illness, infection-control issues such as drug-resistant organisms, accidents/injuries, common geriatric syndromes, palliative and end-of-life care, as well as complementary and alternative therapies. Development of a framework for nursing interventions is emphasized.

  • NURS 6025 – Managing a Continuum of Care for Positive Patient Outcomes

    (4 sem. cr.) While the current healthcare system is inundated with the needs of aging patients with chronic disease, providers are seeking ways to advance patient outcomes management and promote initiatives that will improve the long-term health of the population. In this course, students explore concepts related to the management of disease and the prevention of further disability. They identify the impact of cultural, social, political, legal, and environmental factors on providing a continuum of care. Using an evidence-based approach, students also evaluate a variety of topics that address documentation, evaluation, and quality outcome standards. Students apply methods, tools, and standards learned in the course to the development of care/case management plans. Through these projects, students reflect on nurses’ role in achieving positive outcomes for individuals, groups, and communities.

  • NURS 6030 – The Practice of Population-Based Care

    (4 sem. cr.) The primary goal of public/community health nursing is to maintain and improve the general health of populations through promoting and assisting populations in making positive changes in behavior. In this course, students take an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the practice of population-based care. They examine concepts of health, levels of prevention, epidemiology of wellness, global health issues, and control of health problems as well as principles of interdisciplinary care. Students learn and apply methods to plan, intervene, and evaluate care in communities. They also examine integrative approaches to working with groups in the community to positively impact health behaviors. Additionally, students engage in a group project in which they review and synthesize literature on a health problem and target population and then investigate an appropriate intervention program.

  • NURS 6050 – Policy and Advocacy for Improving Population Health

    (5 cr.) In today’s rapidly changing healthcare delivery system, decisions made within the political arena impact the future of healthcare systems and the populations that healthcare professionals serve. In this course, students examine healthcare reform and its impact on healthcare delivery, population health, and nursing practice. They evaluate policies that influence the structure, financing, and quality in healthcare and examine healthcare delivery from a global perspective. Through discussions, case studies, and other activities, students examine the effects of legal and regulatory processes on nursing practice, healthcare delivery, and population health outcomes. Students also examine ways to advocate for promotion and preservation of population health and gain the necessary skills to influence policy and support changes effected by the passing of new healthcare reform legislation.

  • NURS 6051 – Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Through Technology

    (5 cr.) Evidence-based practice is an essential nurse competency that supports the provision of effective and efficient care. Through team projects and individual applications, students learn how to organize, evaluate, and use health information and knowledge to critically appraise and use information technology to enhance evidence-based practice. Students also apply evidence-based practice to improve advanced nursing practice and healthcare outcomes across organization, public-health, and consumer-health settings.

  • NURS 6052 – Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice

    (5 cr.) Nurses base practice on sound and tested evidence to ensure the safety, high quality, and cost-effectiveness of patient care. This course provides students the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the development and relationship of nursing theory, research, and practice. Through a variety of online activities and coursework, students explore the role of nursing theory in both research and practice. They examine research literature to differentiate and critique various research designs, including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method models; appraise statistical data; and analyze evidence. Acquired knowledge helps students to critically evaluate research to make decisions about use of findings to enhance practice.

  • NURS 6053 – Interprofessional Organizational and Systems Leadership

    (5 cr.) Students in this course prepare to exercise leadership through which they can help to ensure their organization is able to adapt and flourish in the ever-changing world of healthcare. Students explore the impact of healthcare system changes on transforming the nursing profession. They examine and discuss theories related to leadership and management and learn about empowerment strategies that assist master’s-prepared nurses to assume and succeed in leadership roles. Students engage in course assignments that focus on real-world nursing practice applications of theory.

  • NURS 6101 – Policy and Politics in Nursing and Healthcare

    (3 sem. cr.) An important responsibility in the nursing profession is to stay current on factors changing the healthcare delivery system so that individual goals and practices align to overarching healthcare needs. In this course, students engage in a critical analysis of socioeconomic, political, legal, ethical, and global factors that affect nursing and healthcare delivery. Through written and case study applications, students examine issues of cost, quality, and access with emphasis on healthcare reform, including financing and payment systems, delivery models, health information management, and the integration of healthcare services to affect safety and quality. Students also explore inter-professional practice issues as well as nursing’s involvement in health policy and advocacy.

  • NURS 6110 – The Nurse Leader: New Perspectives on the Profession

    (3 sem. cr.) Nurses who assume leadership roles in healthcare must understand various change and management theories, be ready to adapt to constantly evolving work settings and cultures, and lead others by positive example. In this course, students examine and discuss the impact that changes in healthcare systems have on transforming the nursing profession as well the opportunities for leadership resulting from such change. They also assess a variety of theories related to leadership and management. Students engage in activities designed to provide practical application of content on topics such as followership, current situations in practice that require change, strategies to reduce resistance to change, and the development of leadership attributes. Through this course, students have the opportunity to learn strategies and gain skills for becoming empowered as well as for acquiring and sustaining leadership roles in nursing.

  • NURS 6125 – Integrating Theory and Research for Evidence-Based Practice

    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students are provided with an overview of the development of nursing theory, research, and practice. They learn the process by which practitioners critically appraise and translate theory and research into evidence-based practice in the development of clinical outcomes. Students build on foundational statistics concepts and skills as they explore the practical use of diverse research methods and associated statistical techniques. Students employ course concepts as they engage in evidence-based practice applications, such as basic analyses of quantitative and qualitative data and critiquing a qualitative or quantitative study.

  • NURS 6150 – Promoting and Preserving Health in a Diverse Society

    (3 sem. cr.) Prevention of illness and promotion of a healthy lifestyle leads to improved quality of life and are often more cost effective than treatment or intervention. Students in this course explore health improvement and disease management/prevention initiatives intended to promote healthy societies worldwide. They examine the effects of social, political, and environmental conditions in relation to healthcare access, quality of care, and cultural relevance. Students also examine the contributions of nurse leaders who work to improve health in society. Using these examples as well as theories learned in the course, students research a contemporary health issue, develop and explicate a community health project, and describe the models or process they would use to evaluate their project for efficacy.

  • NURS 6200 – The Nurse Administrator: Leading and Managing for Excellence

    (4 sem. cr.) The primary goal of leaders in nursing is to achieve excellence in the delivery of patient services. In this course, students work toward gaining the knowledge and skills required to lead and manage in the nursing profession. They examine organizational, managerial, and leadership theories, and they discuss standards of practice for nursing administration. They also examine roles and responsibilities, quality improvements, strategic planning and management, regulations, and the function of information systems. Students observe practical applications in nursing administration through field experiences in practice settings. They also sharpen writing and critical-thinking skills through application-based writing assignments, such as a business plan proposal, journal entries, and a reflection from the perspective of a nurse administrator.

  • NURS 6201 – Leadership in Nursing and Healthcare

    (5 cr.) This course sets the foundational stage for the Leadership and Management specialty track. Students focus on theoretical and practical aspects of leadership and management functions in healthcare administration, and they discuss standards of practice for nursing administration. They explore a range of topics, including roles and responsibilities, quality improvements, strategic planning and management, regulations, accreditation, and information systems. Through this course, students learn the goals of the nurse leader, including ways to facilitate efficient, quality healthcare delivery to achieve excellence in patient care and services.

  • NURS 6210 – Healthcare Finance and Budgeting

    (4 sem. cr.) In this course, students explore applications of financial principles in developing, budgeting, and managing resources. Students analyze budgeting processes used in healthcare settings, budgeting models and information systems, nurse administrator responsibilities in finance and budgeting, and the impact of private and public policies. They also examine budget and resource decisions that contribute to the achievement of organizational and nursing service outcomes. Students engage in field experiences in which they observe individuals in practice settings who are involved in key financial activities. Additionally, students gain hands-on experience developing financial elements of a business plan for an organization, including a financial statement, revenue and volume projections, reimbursement codes and rates, among others.

  • NURS 6211 – Finance and Economics in Healthcare Delivery

    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn about the fundamentals of finance and budgeting in healthcare delivery. They apply financial principles, such as budgeting processes used in multiple healthcare settings and the nurse administrator’s responsibilities within the context of leading and managing resources. Through these applications, students explore budget development and management of operational and capital resources. They examine the influence of private and public policies and budgeting models that effect quality outcomes within the aspect of financial planning using information systems. Students also explore budget and resource decisions contributing to the achievement of organizational outcomes within the context of providing efficient and cost-effective quality care.

  • NURS 6220 – Human Resource Management

    (4 sem. cr.) One of the most important skills in the healthcare industry is the ability to manage the individuals who provide service and deliver care. Students in this course examine the roles and responsibilities of nurse administrators in human resource management. They explore and discuss current legal, ethical, professional, and practice policies and standards as well as the role of technology to support human resource functions. They also examine strategies that support positive organizational and nursing-service goals. Additionally, students observe human resource administrators within a healthcare organization to observe how they provide support to employees and align responsibilities to the strategic goals of the organization. Students use course concepts and knowledge gained from field experiences to complete various practical-application assignments.

  • NURS 6221 – Managing Human Resources

    (5 cr.) Nursing leadership is grounded firmly in managing our most important resource—human capital. In this course, students address nurse administrators’ role and responsibilities in human resource management. Students explore current legal, ethical, professional, and practice policies and standards, and they learn how to apply technology to human resource functions. Additionally, students learn strategies to support positive organizational and nursing service goals. They also have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the importance of staff satisfaction as well as creating collaborative and supportive partnerships within organizations.

  • NURS 6230 – Case Study: Quality Nursing in a Complex Healthcare Organization

    (4 sem. cr.) Students in this course use a case study approach to synthesize and apply knowledge to a current nursing practice issue. Through a collaborative case study project, students use a variety of administrative strategies to achieve positive patient care delivery outcomes. They develop a comprehensive plan in the context of current nursing-service challenges, analyze and explicate a case study, and provide strategic recommendations that address the issues and challenges presented in the case. Building their professional portfolio, students apply leadership and management theory and strategy to the design of their own case study created for use as a leadership development exercise. Students also review the work of their peers, share perspectives, and provide feedback.

  • NURS 6231 – Healthcare Systems and Quality Outcomes

    (5 cr.) The development of leadership strategies and competencies that support the healthcare organizational delivery of quality care is imperative to quality outcomes within healthcare systems. In this course, students use a systems approach to explore the organizational structures that impact healthcare quality and, ultimately, positive patient outcomes. Students learn how interdisciplinary collaboration is important to the development of quality management structures, gaining an understanding of how quality improvement is a strategic mandate. Engaging in conceptual and application-based assignments, students focus on clinical and service quality planning, control and improvement initiatives, models and tools for process improvement, and the importance and use of metrics in daily operations.

  • NURS 6241 – Strategic Planning in Healthcare Organizations

    (5 cr.) Nurse administrators in healthcare organizations must be aware of and integrate strategic organizational goals. Students in this course use an interdisciplinary case study approach to examine nursing administrative practice issues as they relate to the strategic planning process. Students apply leadership and management principles, concepts, and theory to strategic issues within the case study format. Through these applications, students learn to use a variety of administrative strategies within the context of supportive and collaborative interdisciplinary relationships to achieve positive patient care delivery outcomes that effect positive social change in patient communities.

  • NURS 6300 – Student-Centered Learning in Nursing Education

    (3 sem. cr.) A major goal of nurse educators is to recognize students’ individual and collective needs to create a supportive learning environment. In this course, students explore the theories and principles associated with the diverse learning needs of adults as well as effective strategies to meet these needs. Students examine and discuss a variety of topics, including socialization, motivation, critical thinking, learning styles, and the impact of societal values on the learning environment. They also examine the unique needs of nontraditional, international, educationally disadvantaged, and physically challenged students. Students apply content through the critical analysis and summary of an adult learning plan designed to overcome learning barriers.

  • NURS 6301 – Advanced Pathopharmacology

    Nurse educators must have advanced knowledge of the concepts and principles of pathophysiology and drug therapy that relate to the nursing care of a variety of patient groups. In this course, students integrate concepts of pathophysiological processes and pharmacologic treatment as a foundation for advanced nursing practice. Students have the opportunity to apply the knowledge gained to specific real-world clinical cases.

  • NURS 6310 – Teaching Strategies for Nurse Educators

    (3 sem. cr.) Student success often depends on a supportive learning environment and strategic teaching tactics. In this course, students learn the theories and principles that support a variety of evidence-based teaching strategies. They examine personal and professional teacher attributes that demonstrate positive role-modeling. They also explore and discuss a toolbox of instructional strategies, effective communication and reflective-thinking techniques, student interactions, and student engagement. Students complete assignments designed to provide practical application of content in areas such as lesson planning, needs assessments and learning objectives, strategies and resources, and evaluation planning.

  • NURS 6320 – Integrating Technology Into Nursing Education

    (3 sem. cr.) Contemporary nurse educators often use current and evolving technology to enhance student learning. Students in this course assess technological applications that educators use in teaching/learning environments in nursing, including technologies that support tracking student assignments and participation, outcomes assessment, and grading. They explore the function of media, multimedia, computer-based technologies, models, and simulations;  processes for evaluating and selecting technology; and distance and online education modalities. Additionally, students explore the use of online information resources, presentation systems, and information storage systems, and they assess the integration of technology with texts and printed materials. Students demonstrate their understanding of technology integration through the development of an online course and an evaluation plan designed to assess the potential efficacy of the course.

  • NURS 6321 – Curriculum Development, Assessment, and Evaluation

    (5 cr.) The educational environment is influenced by social, economic, regulatory, and technological transformations. Students in this course learn the theoretical processes that drive curriculum development, assessment, and evaluation. They also focus on curriculum components, which include societal, professional, and educational trends that affect nursing education curricula in the current environment.

  • NURS 6330 – Curriculum Development, Assessment, and Evaluation

    (3 sem. cr.) A wide array of factors, including social, economic, regulatory, and technological transformations, impact the current educational environment. Therefore, nursing education curricula must be relevant and meet the health and nursing needs of society. Students in this course learn about curriculum development and the many processes that contribute to it. They explore the philosophical foundations of curriculum development; curriculum components; societal, professional, and educational trends; frameworks, competencies, and outcomes; organizational constraints; and selection of learning activities. Students also define the processes of curriculum assessment and evaluation in the context of program, course, and student outcomes. They apply course concepts and theory to the development of a syllabus or course outline. Through this course, students work toward attaining the skills required to develop curricula that address the nursing needs of society, support standards of practice, and prepare graduates for practice in diverse settings.

  • NURS 6331 – Teaching Learning Strategies: Integrating Technology Into Nursing Education

    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore ways to use technology successfully and design effective teaching strategies to meet diverse learning needs. Students engage in producing innovative teaching approaches that use a variety of teaching methods, including adapting technology for multiples learning styles. Students write learning objectives using Bloom’s Taxonomy that meet unique needs of nontraditional, international, educationally disadvantaged, and physically challenged learners.

  • NURS 6340 – The Nurse Educator: Roles, Responsibilities, and Relationships

    (4 sem. cr.) The goal of nurses, in all settings, is to be effective educators who guide and facilitate learning and contribute to the educational goals of the organizations in which they work. Students in this course explore the significance of the educator role as it applies to diverse settings, and they assess associated responsibilities and relationships. They examine concepts related to being change agents and leaders, role socialization, legal and ethical expectations, and professional development. They also explore and discuss nurse educator responsibilities, such as balancing role demands, using evidence to improve teaching, promoting scholarship related to teaching, developing partnerships, and engaging in collaboration and advocacy. Using knowledge gained in previous courses as well as concepts presented in this course, students demonstrate their understanding through various application-based exercises. They also observe the role of a nurse educator in a practice setting and record their learning experiences through journal assignments.

  • NURS 6341 – Specialty in Clinical Nursing

    (5 cr.) In today’s complex healthcare arena there is increased patient acuity and a growing need for better-educated nurses at the bedside. Nurse educators must possess advanced clinical knowledge to teach complex clinical content effectively, including selecting a focus to advance their knowledge in a clinical specialty. Students advance their clinical knowledge in a selected specialty to prepare them to fulfill the role of the nurse educator. Note: This course requires a minimum of 72 practicum hours.

  • NURS 6351 – Role of the Nurse Educator

    (5 cr.) Nursing education students in this course explore the roles of the nurse educator, including providers of care, staff developers, clinical educators, and academic educators. Through the practicum experience, students translate and apply theoretical principles from their advanced clinical specialty of providing direct care to patients as well as in their practice of teaching. Students work toward solving real-world problems, with the assistance of their preceptors, in a clinical setting as well as with teaching projects in a classroom setting, patient setting, and staff-development setting. They also present the results of their project in the workplace and in the online classroom. Note: This course requires a minimum of 72 practicum hours.

  • NURS 6400 – Informatics in Nursing and Healthcare

    (4 sem. cr.) In this course, students establish the foundational knowledge for understanding and practicing nursing informatics in healthcare settings. Students learn about core and supporting models and theories for nursing informatics as well as its foundation in science. They explore the use of information technology to support decisions that promote safety and quality in patient-centered care, and they assess concerns about protecting information and system integrity. Students engage in practical assignments through which they become familiar with various informatics-related functions and their impact on nurses in healthcare. They also summarize and reflect on their learning experiences.

  • NURS 6401 – Informatics in Nursing and Healthcare

    (5 cr.) Nursing informatics is a rapidly evolving discipline that impacts all areas of nursing practice. Students in this course establish foundational knowledge for understanding and practicing nursing informatics in healthcare settings. Students explore models and theories that support nursing informatics and examine the use of information technology in support of decisions that promote safety and quality in patient-centered care. They also differentiate concerns about information protection and system integrity. Using concepts learned in the course, students engage in assignments through which they focus on nursing practice in healthcare applications, thus acquiring necessary skills to improve the management of healthcare through informatics nursing practice.

  • NURS 6410 – Information and Knowledge Management

    (4 sem. cr.) Healthcare professionals must have the knowledge and skills to make data-based decisions that lead to effective practice and improved patient care. Students in this course examine database systems as a foundation for studying concepts of data modeling, techniques of data definition, and data manipulation. They explore concepts of information and knowledge management with emphasis on application to the practice setting. Students discuss a variety of topics, such as information management in practice, data modeling, maximizing database performance, and human error in decision making, among others. They also engage in an integrative, collaborative project through which they investigate a current nursing or healthcare issue, plan and build a relational database to address the issue, and assess and provide feedback on plans presented by peers.

  • NURS 6411 – Information and Knowledge Management

    (5 cr.) Effectively managing healthcare data is essential to the practice of nursing informatics. In this course, students examine database systems, including database design and manipulation. Students also explore concepts of information and knowledge management in the healthcare practice setting. Course assignments provide students with the opportunity to work efficiently in teams and build essential skills to execute database design. Through this course, students examine nursing’s contributions to knowledge management in healthcare organizations. (Microsoft Access 2010 is required for this course. Access is commonly furnished with Microsoft Office).

  • NURS 6420 – Supporting Workflow in Healthcare Systems

    (4 sem. cr.) Nurse informaticians must understand the flow of nursing work to develop information systems that provide effective support and usability. In this course, students examine the analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of electronic information systems in healthcare. They compare, contrast, and critique methods of systems design and devote special attention to workflow modeling. They also engage in a variety of assignments to gain an understanding of the various workflow issues that impact the role of a nurse informatician, such as observing or interviewing healthcare professionals, developing a needs assessment plan, creating a model of a problematic workflow, and redesigning the workflow using a case approach.

  • NURS 6421 – Supporting Workflow in Healthcare Systems

    (5 cr.) Effective knowledge and information flow is critical in the coordination of patient care. Nurses are at the center of care coordination for patients and informatics nurses are central to the design and development of information systems that support workflow in nursing practice. Students in this course examine the analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of electronic information systems in healthcare systems. They compare, contrast and critique methods of system design. Students also focus on workflow modeling, including assessment of current state workflow and the design of future state workflow, and they examine workflow design best practices to support the implementation and optimization of electronic health records. (Microsoft Visio 2010 is required for this course).

  • NURS 6430 – Project Management: Healthcare Information Technology

    (4 sem. cr.) The field of health informatics requires leaders who have the knowledge and skill to oversee all types of projects, from product or service conception through delivery to stakeholders; such knowledge requires an understanding of multiple core areas of management, such as scope, time, and quality management, among others. Students in this course explore the theory and practice of how to manage health information technology projects. Students learn how to plan, schedule, and control healthcare informatics projects. They consider hypothetical scenarios and professional experiences as they discuss project management specifics, such as managing risk, controlling changes in scope, and handling budget issues. Students use project management software to build a project schedule, and they engage in an integrative team project scenario, including all the major elements and challenges of a healthcare informatics project in the real world. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • NURS 6431 – System Design, Planning, and Evaluation

    (5 cr.) Healthcare policy, including the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (2009) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (1996), mandates that electronic documentation systems are secure and effective. In this course, students explore systems security and evaluation methods. Through discussion of real-world practice that includes public health and community-based settings, students evaluate the impact of redesigned workflows to the larger system design and throughout the organization. Students create a plan for system design and system evaluation. Through team projects and individual applications, they build skills and confidence that support collaborative, interdisciplinary system design to improve the effectiveness of care. Note: Students participate in a 72-hour practicum experience.

  • NURS 6441 – Project Management: Healthcare Information Technology

    (5 cr.) Healthcare information technology and the implementation of electronic health records are foundational practices critical for success in project management. In this course, students learn the theory of health information technology project management and apply it to real-world experiences. Using project management software, students create a project management plan and schedule, and they control and close tasks related to a health informatics project. Through team projects and individual applications, students build skills and confidence that support the implementation of healthcare information technology to improve the quality of care and patient outcomes. (Microsoft Project 2010 is required for this course).

  • NURS 6500 – Capstone Synthesis: Practicum I

    (3 sem. cr.) Students in the practicum are provided with the opportunity to engage in a supervised experience that integrates theory and research with practice. With guidance and support from their preceptor and instructor, students apply theory to better understand a specialization role in the context of an organization, formulate and achieve individualized learning objectives, and initiate a project conceptualized in collaboration with their preceptor in agreement with the instructor. The practicum (NURS 6500 and NURS 6510) requires a minimum of 125 total hours, which students record in their time log. Students also complete a cumulative journal in which they provide evidence-based or theory-based analyses of activities, issues, or problems that occur during their experience.

  • NURS 6501 – Advanced Pathophysiology

    (5 cr.) Advanced practice nurses must be equipped with an in-depth understanding of pathophysiological disease processes across the lifespan. In this course, students focus on understanding the biophysiological processes, the deviations from these processes, and an in-depth examination of the scientific concepts related to the biology of disease processes. Advanced practice nursing students learn how normal organ systems function and how organ systems are interrelated to help the body maintain homeostasis. Through knowledge of pathophysiological disease processes, students gain the information needed to develop appropriate treatment plans for patients across the lifespan. Students explore a variety of topics, such as immunity, inflammation, cancer genetics, and cardiovascular disease. They also examine a range of disease processes, including hematologic, renal, neurologic, gastrointestinal, and reproductive disorders.

  • NURS 6510 – Capstone Synthesis: Practicum II

    (3 sem. cr.) This course is a continuation of students’ practicum experience and coursework started in NURS 6500. Students bring closure to their work on real-world problems, which they developed with their preceptors earlier in their experience. They also evaluate and complete their practicum project and present it to their work site and in the online classroom. The practicum (NURS 6500 and NURS 6510) requires a minimum of 125 total hours, which students record in their time log. Students continue work on their cumulative journal, which provides evidence-based or theory-based analyses of activities, issues, or problems that occur during their experience.

  • NURS 6511 – Advanced Health Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning

    (5 cr.) The physical and emotional well-being of patients and families can be complex and multifaceted. Advanced practice nurses need to have the knowledge and ability to provide safe, competent, and comprehensive physical health assessments to develop appropriate treatment plans. Students in this course focus on concepts and assessment skills to care for patients across the lifespan. They learn to use diagnostic reasoning, advanced communication and physical assessment skills to identify changes in health patterns, from conception to geriatrics. Students also use a systematic approach through which they focus on the assessment of patients with acute and chronic health problems. They engage in course assignments that emphasize health promotion, disease prevention, and health maintenance across the lifespan.

  • NURS 6521 – Advanced Pharmacology

    (5 cr.) A solid foundation in the concepts and principles of drug therapy across the lifespan is essential to the work of advanced practice nurses. Students in this course apply the advanced principles of pharmacology, including pharmacogenomics, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, by analysis of common drug classes prescribed by advanced practice nurses across the lifespan. Factors influencing successful therapy such as effectiveness, safety, acceptability, cost, genetic/environmental influences, complementary regimens, and patient behaviors are considered. Through this course, students prepare to examine complex decisions in the management and treatment of selected acute and chronic diseases across the lifespan through pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic agents. Advanced practice nursing students will have a more in-depth understanding of drug legislation and regulation for prescribing drugs.

  • NURS 6531 – Advanced Practice Care of Adults Across the Lifespan

    (5 cr.) In this course, students learn how nurse practitioners master the art and science of clinical decision making among adult populations. Students focus on the diagnosis and management of primary healthcare needs and problems of the adult and elderly adult. They engage in a variety of course assignments that focus on physical and behavioral disease processes central to diagnosing illnesses as well as planning, implementing, and evaluating therapeutic treatment programs for acute illnesses commonly encountered in a primary healthcare setting. Students gain confidence in clinical experiences in a primary healthcare setting where they learn to plan, implement, and evaluate therapeutic regimens for adult patients with common acute and chronic illnesses.   (Prerequisite(s): NURS 6501, NURS 6511, and NURS 6521.) Note: This course requires a minimum of 144 practicum hours.

  • NURS 6540 – Advanced Practice Care of Frail Elders

    (5 cr.) The frail elderly are a subpopulation characterized by inactivity and weight loss. In this course, students focus on the complex healthcare and management needs of the frail elderly by advanced nurse practitioners in community settings. Students learn to plan, implement, and evaluate therapeutic regimens through the analysis of case studies and the actual care of frail elderly in various settings. Additionally, students examine content related to end-of-life care and caregiver issues to gain the knowledge and sensibilities needed to implement positive change for the quality of life available to this vulnerable population. (Prerequisite(s): NURS 6501, NURS 6511, NURS 6521, and NURS 6531). Note: This course requires a minimum of 144 practicum hours.

  • NURS 6541 – Primary Care of Adolescents and Children

    (5 cr.) How can a nurse practitioner master the art and science of clinical decision making among pediatric populations? This course provides students with the opportunity to answer this question as they examine content related to the primary healthcare of children and adolescents while focusing on common health problems. Students learn how to identify, diagnose, and manage these problems. They also gain confidence in clinical experience in a primary healthcare setting that provides opportunities to assess, diagnose, plan, implement, and evaluate therapeutic regimens for acute and chronic illnesses commonly found in children and adolescents. (Prerequisite(s):NURS 6501, NURS 6511, NURS 6521, and NURS 6531). Note: This course requires a minimum of 144 practicum hours.

  • NURS 6550 – Advanced Practice Care of Adults in Acute Care Settings I

    (5 cr.) The complex assessment and care of patients in the hospital setting will require advanced practice nurses to obtain the specialized skills necessary to provide quality care for patients in these acute care settings. This course is designed to prepare students to provide care for acutely ill and critically ill patients. Students in this course will be introduced to the role of the advanced practice nurse, while gaining confidence in caring for acutely ill patients. Through course assignments and clinical practice in the acute care setting they will plan, implement, and evaluate care for critically ill patients. Students will also increase their knowledge of pharmacologic management of hospitalized patients, while applying knowledge gained through previous coursework.

    Note: Note: This course requires a minimum of 144 practicum hours.

  • NURS 6551 – Primary Care of Women

    (5 cr.) How can a nurse practitioner decide what is important to focus on in a 15- to 30-minute appointment with a woman seeking primary care? Students in this course gain opportunities to teach and promote wellness in women through the process of screening for commonly seen in gynecological disorders. Students learn to analyze data to interpret results for the benefit of women seeking assistance with planning healthy lifestyle behaviors. They also gain clinical experience in a primary healthcare setting that provides opportunities to increase competence in diagnosis, treatment, referrals, or follow-up care with a concentration on improving patient outcomes. (Prerequisite(s): NURS 6501, NURS 6511, NURS 6521, NURS 6531, and either NURS 6540 or NURS 6541). Note: This course requires a minimum of 144 practicum hours.

  • NURS 6560 – Advanced Practice Care of Adults in Acute Care Settings II Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams

    (5 cr.) Students in this course will advance their clinical competence in the care of patients in acute care settings by building on knowledge and skills gained in the NURS 6550. Through clinical practice, students will build confidence as they begin the transition from student to advanced practice nurse. Classroom activities and case studies will enable students to explore the complex healthcare system including multiple governmental, social and personal resources available to acutely ill adults across the age continuum. Clinical experiences in hospital settings will provide students with the continued opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate management plans for adults and older adults with complex acute, critical, and chronic illness. The application of knowledge in the management of patients and the collaboration between the advanced practice nurse and the patient, family, and interprofessional healthcare team are emphasized.

    Note: Note: This course requires a minimum of 144 practicum hours.

  • NURS 6561 – Direct Care Roles in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Across the Lifespan

    (5 cr.) Taking a broader view of the comprehensive perspectives of health in a community is imperative for an advanced practice nurse. Students in this course focus on health-related behaviors that impact the health and wellness of individuals across their lifespan. Students examine how nutrition, exercise, smoking, and a sedentary lifestyle relate to common diseases. Through case studies and a group project, students complete risk assessments, diagnose health problems directly related to risky lifestyles, and implement and evaluate various behavioral and therapeutic measures to reduce the negative behavior and improve lifestyles. (Prerequisite(s): NURS 6501, NURS 6511, NURS 6521, NURS 6531, and either NURS 6540 or NURS 6541, and NURS 6551). Note: This course requires a minimum of 144 practicum hours. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • NURS 6600 – Capstone Synthesis Practicum Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams

    (5 cr.) Students in this course apply the MSN curriculum experience by translating knowledge into practice by designing, developing, and implementing a project in a professional healthcare setting. By using the culmination of learning, students gain the opportunity effect positive social change within the healthcare delivery environment in the roles of change agent and nurse. The result of the practicum experience provides students with an experience through which they develop their passion as a practitioner while enhancing the nurse role as an advocate for social change within the context of a scholarly presence. Note: This course requires a minimum of 144 practicum hours.

  • NURS 8000 – Foundations and Essentials of Doctoral Study in Nursing

    (1 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and are provided with a foundation for professional development in doctoral nursing practice. Students learn professional standards and end-of-program expectations. They engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students also explore the essentials of being a Walden doctoral student; past, present, and future similarities and differences between the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and a Ph.D. in nursing, relevant professional and specialty standards of doctoral-level nursing practice, intra- and interprofessional collaboration, and the process of the DNP project.

  • NURS 8100 – Healthcare Policy and Advocacy Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams

    (5 cr.) Many economic, financial, and political factors influence the delivery of healthcare, making healthcare reform a challenging  task. In this course, students examine these factors, challenges, and consider policy reform through legal, regulatory, ethical, societal, and organizational contexts. They examine the political and policy process, including agenda setting, stakeholder analysis, and application of policy analysis frameworks. Students also explore the importance of interprofessional collaboration in improving health outcomes through the policy process and advocacy for development and implementation of nursing and healthcare policies in organizations at the local, state, national, and international levels. Students engage in written analyses through which they develop new policies and critically evaluate existing policies though policy analysis frameworks.

  • NURS 8110 – Theoretical and Scientific Foundations for Nursing

    (5 cr.) In this course, students focus on the integration of scientific, philosophical, and theoretical concepts as the basis for the highest level of nursing practice. They examine the scientific underpinnings for nursing practice, including bio-behavioral, pathophysiological, psychosocial, and environmental sciences, and they explore the interrelationship among knowledge, research, and practice. Students also explore and discuss clinical inquiry, ethical issues, and models of evidence-based practice. Considering various philosophies, students describe their own philosophy of nursing. They also apply course concepts to a variety of practical assignments, including a literature review, concept map, and evaluation of current clinical practice problems, among others.

  • NURS 8200 – Methods for Evidence-Based Practice

    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is the integration of scientific, philosophical, and theoretical concepts as the basis for the highest level of nursing practice. The scientific underpinnings for nursing practice including bio-behavioral, pathophysiological, psychosocial, and environmental sciences are examined. The interrelationship between knowledge, research, and practice is explored. Clinical inquiry, ethical issues, and models of evidence-based practice are presented.

  • NURS 8210 – Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Through Technology

    (5 cr.) When used effectively, information technology can support generation of new knowledge and emerging information technologies. In this course, students examine the critical appraisal and use of information technology in advanced nursing practice. Students work toward gaining the skills and knowledge to process and manage information systems/technology resources in consumer, clinical, and public health settings. Students engage in a variety of discussions and assignments designed to provide practical application of content on topics including retrieval and critical analysis of digital data to support healthcare quality improvement; electronic health records integration and evaluation; and Web-based learning and intervention tools to support and improve patient care. They also explore ethical, regulatory, and legal issues as well as the healthcare standards and principles for selecting and evaluating information systems and patient care technology. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • NURS 8250 – Advanced Theoretical and Scientific Perspectives in Nursing

    (5 cr.) This course focuses on the sufficient formal and informal learning experiences to build scientific depth in an identified area of study.  The student will gain the competencies to critique, utilize and integrate different theoretical and scientific perspectives for the conduct of research including team science to generate new ideas based on a critical evaluation of existing knowledge. Attention is given to integration of the components of scholarship, research, teaching, mentoring and service to the profession gained from understanding the theoretical/scientific underpinnings of nursing and other disciplines.

  • NURS 8300 – Organizational and Systems Leadership for Quality Improvement

    (5 cr.) In this course, students consider the importance of developing leadership strategies and competencies specific to healthcare organizations and systems for quality improvement. Students focus on understanding the unique organizational structures and behaviors that impact organizational performance. They explore and discuss the roles and responsibilities of leaders, managers, and administrators within healthcare organizations from the macro (organization-wide) perspective and micro (individual and team performance) perspective. They also examine key organizational theories, principles, and concepts, including mission, vision, values, and strategic and operational planning in relation to achieving the effective and efficient delivery of safe healthcare services. Additionally, students consider the goal of managing outcomes through data analysis as well as through knowledge and skills based on contemporary theory and research, including  motivation, communication, teamwork, leadership style, power, change, quality management, coalition building, negotiation, and conflict management. Applying course concepts, students engage in self-evaluation and consider ways to develop leadership skills and self-awareness.

  • NURS 8310 – Epidemiology and Population Health

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of epidemiologic methodology in the study of the distribution and etiology of disease and health-related conditions in human populations. Students examine important study designs and discuss the strengths and weaknesses inherent in each. They explore and discuss select global problems, such as infectious diseases, bioterrorism attacks, and effects of disasters and emergencies, and they apply epidemiologic and biostatistical methods to study factors related to aggregate, population, and individual health. Additionally, students work toward gaining cultural sensitivity and an interprofessional approach to caring for diverse populations at risk to ensure access to care.

  • NURS 8400 – Evidence-Based Practice I: Assessment and Design

    (5 cr.) In this course, students focus on the competencies required of the healthcare professional in planning for the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of health promotion and disease prevention initiatives. They explore and discuss strategic approaches to planning, implementation, and evaluation, including cost-benefit analysis. Preparing for their DNP project, students select a faculty mentor and develop portfolio evidence through an integrative critical review of literature, which leads them to identify a clinical/practice question. Note: This is a 5-credit course (4 didactic credits, 1 clinical credit). Clinical hours have a 1:6 ratio (credit/clinical), resulting in 72 clinical hours.

  • NURS 8410 – Best Practices In Nursing Specialties

    (5 cr.) A scholarly inquiry of key concepts in nursing is presented in this course. Students analyze best practices and evolving issues in their nursing areas of practice. They explore advanced specialty practice problems through a guided initial review of literature. Students develop a program or project to address clinical/practice questions under the guidance of an approved clinical mentor. Students generate a portfolio evidence plan to address clinical/practice questions related to issues such as program planning, practice change, consultation, quality improvement projects, pilot study proposals, and Institutional Review Board (IRB) approvals. Note: This is a 5-credit course (4 didactic credits, 1 clinical credit). Clinical hours have a 1:6 ratio (credit/clinical), resulting in 72 clinical hours.

  • NURS 8500 – Evidence-Based Practice II: Planning and Implementation

    (3 cr.) In this DNP practicum course, students focus on planning and implementing a program/project design to address their clinical/practice questions; students complete work under the guidance of an approved clinical mentor. Generating practicum portfolio evidence, students complete a systematic review that drills down to the evidence regarding their clinical/practice question and resulting findings, conclusions, and recommendations. Note:  This 3-credit practicum course has a 1:6 ratio of credit to clinical hours, resulting in 216 clinical hours.

  • NURS 8510 – Evidence-Based Practice III: Implementation, Evaluation, and Dissemination

    (3 cr.) This DNP practicum course will focus on evaluation and dissemination of a program/project design to intervene with clinical/practice questions under the guidance of an approved clinical mentor. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • NURS 8551 – Preparing for Dissertation

    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is on the preparation for the dissertation phase of training. In this course, students identify a dissertation topic and potential dissertation committee members; begin to conduct a literature review; develop a problem statement and research questions; and evaluate research designs, methods, and types of analyses to use for their dissertation. Students also complete their initial premise in this course and an annotated outline of their prospectus.

  • NURS 8600 – DNP Field Experience

    (1 cr.) Students may take the DNP Field Experience course up to six times based on practicum hours attained prior to DNP admission. Students generate practicum portfolio evidence: Submission of a scholarly article for refereed publication and/or actual presentation (podium) and completed portfolio requirements. This 1-credit practicum course has a 1:6 ratio of credit to practicum hours, resulting in 72 practicum hours.

  • NURS 8700 – DNP Project Mentoring

    (0 cr.) This course will serve as a platform for the ongoing collaborative learning communication between students’ and their DNP Project Committee chairs and as a repository for drafts and documentation materials related to the DNP Project. Students will be assigned to sections of NURS 8700 based on their DNP Project Committee chair.

  • NURS 8701 – DNP Project Completion

    (3 cr.) The purpose of this course is to serve as a platform for ongoing communication between students and their DNP Project Committee chairs and a repository for drafts and documentation related to the DNP Project. Students will be assigned to sections of NURS 8701 based on their DNP Project Committee chair, which will support communication between students who are working on their DNP Projects with common faculty chairs in an ongoing collaborative learning community. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • NURS 9000 – Dissertation

    (5 cr.) This course offers doctoral students the opportunity to integrate their Program of Study into an in-depth exploration of an interest area that includes the completion of a research study. Students complete the dissertation independently, with the guidance of a dissertation supervisory committee chair and committee members, in a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students complete a prospectus, proposal, Institutional Review Board application, and dissertation.

  • PHIL 1001 – Introduction to Philosophy♦

    (5 cr.) Philosophy is a way to explore and process complex issues in life through different perspectives. This course provides students the opportunity to think about their values, their knowledge and belief systems, their lives, and their place in the world. Students learn about concepts of logic, ethics, metaphysics, reality and truth, and political philosophy. They explore the history of philosophy in the context of important contemporary issues and positions. Through this exploration, combined with self-reflection, students learn to ground their personal philosophies in traditions of philosophical reasoning.
    (Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PHIL 2001 – Ethics♦

    (5 cr.) Students are introduced to the nature and foundations of moral judgments and applications to contemporary moral issues in this course. Students explore an overview of ethical constraints from the prevailing philosophical and religious perspectives. Using a range of moral theories, students assess their beliefs, values, and perspectives on various ethical scenarios. Through this course, students gain the knowledge needed to formulate solutions to problems of professional and private life against the backdrop of ethical theory.
    (Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6204 – Intergroup Relations♦

    (5 cr.) This course will provide an in-depth study of basic and applied research and theory on both group processes and group relations and could include some of the following topics: prejudice, discrimination, stereotyping, social categorization, minority and majority influence, group decision making, leadership, group structure, group socialization, bargaining and negotiation, intergroup conflict and cooperation, collective action and cognition, collective self and identity, social identity, language and identity, ethnic and cultural relations, and social dilemmas.

  • PSYC 6205 – History and Systems of Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students focus on the historical and philosophical roots of psychology and counseling. Through conceptual and application-based assignments, students learn about structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, psychoanalysis, gestaltism, and existentialism as well as contemporary perspectives, including evolutionary psychology, positive psychology, postmodernism, and feminist psychology. Students demonstrate and apply their knowledge through an integrative writing assignment in which they address the developmental history of a major area of study within a subdivision of psychology. Students also explore and consider themes of diversity and multiculturalism in psychology and counseling within each of the perspectives.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6211 – Contemporary Issues in Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an advanced-level overview of the core areas, topics, and concepts in psychology as well as considerations for related contemporary issues. They engage in a variety of conceptual and application-based assignments on the biological bases of behavior, learning and memory, cognition, motivation, lifespan development, theories of personality, stress and coping, psychological disorders, and social psychology. Students practice and develop critical-reading and analysis skills through reviews of journal articles and media publications. Through these reviews, students focus specifically on distinguishing facts and opinions, identifying bias in writing, and discovering the importance of data and evidence. Students use this knowledge in the analysis and composition of scientific writing. They also assess and incorporate themes of diversity in their study and assignments.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6212 – Principles of Organizational Psychology and Development♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with the theoretical foundation for organizational inquiry. Students build on their knowledge of the contemporary business environment to gain a deeper understanding of how organizations function as well as how strategic design can affect efficiency and productivity.  Students explore change management; organizational culture, behavior, and development; group dynamics; and systems-level thinking. Sharpening critical-thinking and creative skills, students employ course concepts to identify organizational development opportunities based on an in-depth analysis of an organization. Through this project, students gain awareness of practical strategies for organizational development efforts.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6213 – Strategic Talent Management and Development♦

    (5 cr.) Successful organizations and businesses know that an effective way to achieve goals is to align business strategies with workforce talent. Students in this course learn how to leverage people in organizations to achieve business success and how to leverage business strategy to foster individual growth. They explore and discuss a variety of topics, including talent acquisition and retention, workforce and succession planning, organizational communication, leadership, and performance management. Students apply concepts as they prepare a strategic talent management and development audit as well as an overall talent management and development strategy.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6214 – Consulting for Organizational Change♦

    (5 cr.) Organizational and professional development (OPD) professionals promote and implement organizational change by using fundamental techniques of change management. Students in this course examine and apply these tools, including consulting competencies, approaches, and organizational change models to learn the skills of an OPD consultant. Students explore methods for accelerating individual, group, and organizational performance through consulting, coaching, and change management. They also explore related topics, such as organizational assessment; team development; strategic planning; group dynamics; power, politics, and influence; leadership; and conflict management. Students apply course concepts to the assessment of an organization and the development of strategies to address identified needs for change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • PSYC 6215 – Lifespan Development♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an advanced overview of human development through the lifespan, including prenatal, childhood, adolescent, adult, and late-adult phases. Students examine and apply basic processes and theories to developmental milestones that occur within these phases of development. They explore factors of heredity and environmental elements on human development, and they consider ethical issues, research considerations, and global perspectives as they assess strategies to promote optimal development. Students also engage in coursework and discussions that highlight themes of diversity and social change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6216 – Dynamics of Contemporary, International, and Virtual Organizations♦

    (5 cr.) Globalization, technological innovation, and market factors continually change the context of business, requiring professionals who understand how organizations function to work through challenges and harness opportunities for change. In this course, students explore the implications of the changing nature of organizations as well as the emergence of international and virtual organizations in a global economy. Through contextual and application-based assignments, students address the unique opportunities and challenges for government, for-profit, nonprofit, international, and virtual organizations. Applying acquired knowledge and skills, students provide a diagnosis and recommendations for a specific organization’s development efforts.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6220 – Psychology of Personality♦

    (5 cr.) Professionals study personality in a variety of contexts to better understand the factors that compose an individual’s psychological framework, including feelings, thoughts, and motivations. Students in this course are introduced to the major theories of personality and personality assessment approaches. Students examine research that supports multiple theories as well as basic concepts and principles of the various schools of thought. They also explore and discuss related topics, such as various aspects of psychology, including psychoanalytic, biological, behaviorist, learning, social-cognitive, trait and skill, humanistic, and existential, in addition to individual, cultural, and gender differences in personality. Students consider themes of diversity throughout the course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6225 – Biopsychology♦

    (5 cr.) An important branch of psychology, known as biopsychology, combines neuroscience with basic psychological models for the purpose of understanding how the brain and neurotransmitters influence human behavior. In this course, students examine the structure and functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems and explore the impact of neurobiology, endocrinology, and physiology on human behavior. They learn about brain functioning, including exploration of neural conduction; effects of neurotransmitters; sensory systems; and mechanisms of attention, memory, perception, and language. Students also explore literature addressing issues related to neuroplasticity, lateralization, and regeneration. Applying knowledge and skills gained throughout the course, students develop a final research paper through which they synthesize biopsychology concepts, critically analyze related research, and demonstrate APA-writing ability. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6235 – Cognitive Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) The course has a basis in cognitive neuroscience and begins by providing students with an overview of the history of the field and approaches used to study the mind. Students continue with an examination of the fundamentals of cognition. They examine various domains of cognitive psychology, including how information is acquired (i.e., basic learning processes, perception, and attention); fundamental issues of memory and representations of knowledge; language and understanding; thinking (e.g., reasoning, problem-solving, expertise and creativity, and judgment and decision making); and emotions. Additionally, students explore individual and cultural differences across domains. Students apply theories and concepts to analyze and report on the impact of cognitive psychological research on a contemporary issue of interest.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6238 – Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior♦

    (5 cr.) This course reviews core theories of cognition and affect and their roles in human functioning. The course will review basic components of cognition, including knowledge acquisition, knowledge representation, language and various aspects of thinking, and emotions. There is also a focus on the multidimensional and interactive characteristics of human cognitive and affective functioning. A specific emphasis is placed on theories and research bearing on how cognition and affect interact in important areas of human functioning, such as emotional regulation, construction of reality, motivation, psychopathology, and health.

  • PSYC 6240 – Human Motivation♦

    (5 cr.) This course provides an overview of physiological, psychological, and social aspects in the study of motivation and includes an exploration of historical and contemporary theories and perspectives. The course emphasizes both conceptual understanding of theories associated with motivation and their applications to personal, professional, and social issues. Major topics include physiological, learned, cognitive, and emotional aspects of motivation. Themes of diversity are threaded throughout the course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6242 – Changing Health Behavior♦

    (5 cr.) This course will review past and current models of health behavior change, disease prevention, disease management, and relapse prevention. It will provide coverage of health-related issues, including dietary needs, tobacco and drug use, safer sexual practices, and stress management. In addition, it will examine the analysis of behavior change within specific populations (young, elderly, cognitively impaired, etc.) and factors that predict or serve as obstacles to lifestyle change and adherence.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6245 – Social Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, you will use the lens of social psychology to examine both social cognitions and social behavior—nearly all phenomena that pertain to the individual in society. You will explore the topics of perceptions, attitudes, relationships and attraction, the motivation to help others, prejudice and aggression, conformity and obedience, group behavior, and the influence of culture, and consider how knowledge of these topics can be used to effect positive social change. Your application of what you learn in this course culminates in a final project in which you develop a plan for using social psychology research to address a significant social problem. Moreover, your learning in this course will extend to your personal and professional life, and truly enable you to effect positive social change as a scholar-practitioner committed to doing so.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6250 – Group Process and Dynamics

    (5 cr.) Group work is an increasingly popular, effective counseling method that allows group members to share perspectives and provide useful feedback and information in a structured setting. Students are provided with a comprehensive review of counseling approaches to group therapy in this course. Students examine the theoretical bases of different approaches to group therapy, including psychoanalytic, existential, person-centered, gestalt, transactional, behavioral, rational-emotive, and reality therapy. They engage in a variety of practical application assignments and discussions, focusing on counseling of different types of groups, the efficacy of using group therapy as the treatment method with multicultural and diverse populations, and the stages of group development.

  • PSYC 6290 – Independent Readings

    (1–5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an opportunity to examine a topic area of interest in greater depth than that which is provided in the course offerings. Students work with the course instructor to design a syllabus that guides the independent readings project. Content must include theoretical and empirical research literature that addresses implications related to diversity and professional practice. Students may only select this course once during their program of study and cannot use this course to replace one that currently exists in the catalog. (Prerequisite(s): Approved petition to academic advising.)

  • PSYC 6301 – Philosophical Foundations in Psychological Research♦

    (5 cr.) Students are introduced to the nature of scientific discovery and explanation as it applies to the social sciences and to psychology in particular in this course. Students explore the etiology and epistemology of science, the relationship between philosophy and science, the nature of scientific explanation, and the  progress of science (the “paradigm”). They also examine philosophical movements that influence research and research priorities, including positivism, constructivism, and other post-modern research paradigms (including feminist, race, and gay/lesbian psychologies). Students apply concepts involving scholarly inquiry and research to various written assignments designed to provide practical application of content.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6304 – Statistics 2♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students review and expand on statistical techniques mastered in Statistics 1, such as the t-test, correlation analysis, ANOVA, and chi-square tests. Students explore underlying assumptions and applications of factorial, repeated measures (within groups), mixed-design ANOVA, multiple regression, and logistic regression. They learn statistical and analytical applications as well as how to critically read and write about psychological research—skills and techniques needed to complete the doctoral dissertation. Students also engage in analyses involving the use of the SPSS statistical software package. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6305.) Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6305 – Statistics 1♦

    (5 cr.) Psychology practitioners use statistics in a variety of professional undertakings, such as creating studies to assess human behavior or deciding which treatment approaches are most effective for a specific client. Students in this course are provided with a thorough analysis of basic descriptive and inferential statistical methods commonly used in the social sciences. Students work toward developing the skills with which to write, analyze, and critique social science research. They learn various methods, including computation and analysis of frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, and statistical hypothesis testing. Students also examine statistical tests (and underlying assumptions), including z-score; single-sample, independent-sample, and related-sample t-tests; analysis of variance; correlation, regression; and chi-square tests. This course also provides students with an introduction to the SPSS statistical software package.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6306 – Statistics 3♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an introduction to multivariate statistics and their uses in the social sciences. Students explore a variety of topics, including data screening and cleaning, factorial ANOVA, analysis of covariance, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), discriminant function analysis, multiple regression, logistic regression, path analysis, factor and principle components analysis, and structural equation modeling. Through contextual and application-based assignments, students  focus on understanding theory and using SPSS to solve problems. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6304.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6310 – Research Design♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students have the opportunity to build a foundation in the design of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches to psychological research. Students learn the strengths and limitations of each method and under what circumstances each approach would be the most appropriate research design. They also learn the importance of scholarly writing as well as how to identify a topic for research and how to conduct a literature search. Students gain hands-on practice developing a research proposal through which they address key elements, such as collecting and analyzing data, writing an introduction, stating a purpose for the study, identifying research questions and hypotheses, using theory, and defining the significance of the study. Additionally, students consider the legal and ethical issues associated with human subjects’ protection. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6305.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6311 – Qualitative Analysis♦

    (5 cr.) There are five major traditions of qualitative research methodology commonly used in psychology practice: phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, biography, and case study. Through the context of each of these traditions, students in this course examine varying approaches to proposal planning, research design, data collection, data analysis, aspects of quality and verification, ethical and legal issues, and interpretation and presentation of results in the narrative report. Students work toward gaining the knowledge and skills to design a qualitative research project that could serve as the foundation for thesis or dissertation work. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6305 and PSYC 6310.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6314 – Program Evaluation♦

    (5 cr.) The skills required to assess research and work effectively with stakeholders are among the many proficiencies required of professionals who evaluate and develop programs. In this course, students examine these skill sets as well as the history, theory, and major approaches underlying program evaluation. Students learn how to select appropriate quantitative and/or qualitative models and techniques to perform evaluations, demonstrate program effectiveness, and disseminate results. Additionally, students explore the procedures and techniques involved in offering their evaluation services to a specific group or organization. They also examine strategies to gain stakeholder interest in developing appropriate standards, research progress, and evaluation outcomes. Students acquire practical experience evaluating a program of interest through which they outline organizational structure, identify stakeholders, employ evaluation models, explain steps in planning, and predict possible challenges or stakeholder fears, for which they recommend solutions. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6305 and PSYC 6310.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6315 – Tests and Measurement♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of the different types of tests used in clinical, educational, and organizational settings. Students engage in a comprehensive examination of psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments. They examine normative sampling and standardization, reliability and validity, test score interpretation, and test development. Students also consider related ethical, legal, and sociocultural issues, including cultural bias and fairness. Professional standards for testing provide a foundation for the course. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 6200.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

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PSYC 6320 – Advanced Methods in Mixed Qualitative-Quantitative Research Designs♦

(5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to gain an in-depth understanding of the use of qualitative and quantitative research designs in psychological research. Students assess a broad overview of paradigms that guide qualitative and quantitative research traditions, including logical positivism, post-positivism, pragmatism, and constructivism. Students review methods common to each tradition and engage in a comprehensive exploration of mixed-method approaches, including strategies for collecting, analyzing, and disseminating data as well as for incorporating both methods at all stages of the research project. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application-based exercises to gain practical experience designing a mixed-method research project that could serve as the foundation for their dissertation. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6305, PSYC 6310, and PSYC 6311.)
♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6331 – Interviewing and Observational Strategies

    (5 cr.) Personal attitudes, values, and beliefs often affect a counselor’s ability to establish an appropriate relationship and rapport with clients. In this course, students learn to evaluate their personal attitudes and beliefs to positively influence their counseling approaches. They explore principles and skills related to interviewing and observation, and they examine related legal, ethical, and cultural issues. Students gain practice in conducting interviews, making behavioral observations, collecting and interpreting data during an interview, and developing written reports of findings. Synthesizing concepts, skills, and personal reflections, students demonstrate their ability to engage in a counseling session using techniques learned throughout the course. Note: This course also requires that students have access to a video recording device, a tripod, and an audio recording device, which they will begin using the first week of class.

  • PSYC 6333 – Crisis Vicarious Trauma and Compassion Fatigue

    (5 cr.) Through this course, students gain an understanding and awareness of vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue for trauma-response-helping professionals. They examine intervention strategies and models of treatment and prevention of vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue through the lens of counselor educators, supervisors, and clinicians. Applying course concepts, students gain hands-on practice conducting a needs assessment and examining the use of standardized instruments. They also propose social change recommendations related to vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue to promote informed and competent trauma-response-helping professionals. Students engage in course assignments that emphasize the ethical, legal, multicultural, and spiritual implications for wellness and self-care, including personal, professional, and organizational elements. As a final project, students interview a trauma-response-helping professional and develop an organizational wellness plan for their setting.

  • PSYC 6341 – Psychological Assessment: Cognitive

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to basic skills related to cognitive and academic achievement testing. Students examine the theoretical basis, skill sets, and examples of psychological assessment. They learn to establish and maintain rapport in a testing situation; administer, record, and score specific measures of cognitive ability and academic achievement; interpret test results; and summarize results in a written report. Students also engage in practical assignments, focusing on applied aspects of psychological testing. (Prerequisite(s): Matriculation into the Counseling Psychology, Clinical Psychology, or School Psychology specializations, or M.S. in Mental Health Counseling students by permission; a grade of B or better in PSYC 6315 or in another graduate course in tests and measurements.)

  • PSYC 6342 – Psychotherapy Interventions I

    (5 cr.) In this course, students have the opportunity to acquire and demonstrate clinical and counseling skills in the context of empirically supported modes of intervention. Students explore and display intervention techniques related to the beginning, middle, and ending phase of therapy, focusing on a stage-of-change model and universal techniques. They apply skills in treatment-planning exercises, clinical vignettes, and face-to-face simulations of psychotherapy sessions. Note: Students must film and submit videos of mock therapy sessions; therefore, they must have access to a digital camcorder for this course.

  • PSYC 6351 – Psychological Assessment: Personality

    (5 cr.) Students are introduced to basic skills related to the assessment of personality. Students examine historical and theoretical foundations of personality tests, including the MMPI-2, BSI, NEO PI-R, and the Rorschach in this course. They learn to administer, record, score, and interpret specific measures of personality. Students also engage in practical assignments, focusing on applied aspects of psychological testing. Through a final project, students synthesize assessment data from cognitive and personality assessments into a formal written report. Students also engage in a skill-based, face-to-face residency requirement. (Prerequisite(s): Matriculation into the Counseling, Clinical, or School Psychology specializations, or M.S. in Mental Health Counseling students by permission; a grade of B or better in PSYC 6315/PSYC 8316 or in another graduate course in tests and measurements. Students must take the assessment courses sequentially: PSYC 6341/PSYC 8341 Psychological Assessment: Cognitive prior to PSYC 6351/PSYC 8351 Psychological Assessment: Personality.) Note: This course requires students to submit a videotape of a mock assessment session; therefore, students must have access to a digital camcorder.

  • PSYC 6390 – Thesis

    (12 cr. minimum—6 cr. per term for minimum 2 terms) Students in this course are provided with the tools to integrate their program of study logically and comprehensively into an in-depth exploration of a topic of research interest. Students may choose either a critical literature review with a proposed research design or an empirical study. They engage in an online course that requires weekly participation in readings, discussions, and other assignments designed to help them complete each component of the thesis. Students complete their final thesis independently under the mentorship of a thesis chair. (Prerequisite(s): Completion of all coursework; may be concurrently enrolled with last term of coursework.)

  • PSYC 6391 – Capstone I

    (5 cr.) Students are provided with the opportunity to synthesize knowledge and skills acquired throughout their program into a practical, integrative project designed to promote positive social changein a capstone project. In this course, students begin their final capstone project. They work with the leaders of a chosen organization to assess a topical issue or need and formulate an original research question. Students then create and implement a data collection and analysis strategy to develop an organizational diagnosis. (Prerequisite(s): All courses; PSYC 6216 taken concurrently with first quarter of Capstone.)

  • PSYC 6392 – Capstone II

    (5 cr.) This course is a continuation of PSYC 6391 – Capstone, in which students began their final capstone organizational change project. This portion of the project provides students the opportunity to present their organizational diagnosis as well as proposed recommendations through a written paper and PowerPoint presentation to the organization of interest. (Prerequisite(s): All courses; PSYC 6216 taken concurrently with first quarter of Capstone.)

  • PSYC 6393 – M.S. in Psychology Capstone

    (5 cr.) Students are provided with the opportunity to synthesize knowledge and skills acquired throughout their program into a practical project designed to promote positive social change in a capstone project. During this course, students work on a capstone project in which they complete a major integrative paper on a topic related to their specialization, incorporating theoretical and practical knowledge as well as social scientific research skills acquired throughout the program. The instructor may approve other capstone projects presented by students. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • PSYC 6400 – Diversity in Child/Adolescent Development and Learning

    (5 cr.) Diversity can have a profound influence on children’s and adolescents’ development and learning. Students in this course explore areas of diversity, such as gender, culture, language, disability, and sexual orientation and how they influence developmental and learning needs of this particular population. Applying core concepts and theories of development and learning, psychology students engage in practical approaches through which they reflect on their own perspectives and preconceptions and learn the complex ways diversity influences development and learning of the children and teenagers. Moreover, using the latest research and resources, students work toward gaining knowledge and skills for improving developmental and learning outcomes for children and adolescents.

  • PSYC 6401 – Principles/Conceptual Foundations of Behavior Analysis for Children and Adolescents

    (5 cr.) Applied behavior analysis is a set of skills used in the assessment and treatment of individuals with a variety of behavioral problems and developmental delays, including autism spectrum disorders. Students in this course explore the concepts and principles of applied behavior analysis and gain an understanding and treatment of behavior problems of children and adolescents in applied settings. Students apply these concepts and principles in the development and implementation of data-based decision making using functional behavioral assessments and the creation of intervention procedures. Techniques in observation, use of reinforcement, and repeated measures are explored. These techniques are applied to develop intervention plans and to assess treatment effectiveness.

  • PSYC 6465 – Foundations of Industrial/Organizational Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) An understanding of the psychological principles of leader development often enhances leadership skills and ability to influence others to work toward common goals. In this course, students examine the psychology of leadership and leader development through cross-cultural, social, psychological, and political contexts. They identify and assess the psychological theories of leadership, leadership styles, qualities of great leaders, global leadership competencies, and instruments used to assess leadership and leadership potential. Students apply these psychological theories to assess and develop their own capacity for leadership.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6480 – Psychology of Organizational Behavior♦

    (5 cr.) This course examines the application of behavioral theories in organizational settings. The focus is on individual, group, and organizational behavior. Topics include individual differences in employee motivation and job satisfaction, group development, team building, organizational leadership, and organizational design, culture, and development. Students acquire a broad knowledge base in organizational psychology, its research, and its applications.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6510 – Career Counseling♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to develop practical skills in career and vocational assessment as well as functional knowledge of how career assessment can assist in the exploration and understanding of the interrelationship among work, family, and life roles. They examine major sources of career and work information available on the Internet as well as through printed material and computer-based guidance systems. Gaining practical career counseling experience, students administer, score, and interpret printed and computer-based assessments of career interests, beliefs, and values. Students learn how to integrate career development theory and assessment results with career clinical interventions. They also examine clinical and assessment issues, devoting attention to computer-based applications and multicultural implications.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6551 – I/O Testing and Measurement♦

    (5 cr.) This course provides students with an in-depth study of measurement theory and the tests used in organizational settings. It includes a comprehensive examination of psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments, including classical test theory, item response theory (IRT), and item forensics approaches to testing. Topics include normative sampling and standardization, reliability and validity, test score interpretation, and test development. The course also addresses ethical, legal, and sociocultural issues, including cultural bias and fairness. Professional standards for testing provide a foundation for the course.

  • PSYC 6552 – Psychology of Motivation at Work♦

    (5 cr.) The course will provide an in-depth study of major topics in micro-level organizational behavior. Accountability, organization citizenship behaviors, forms of organizational attachment, motivation, goal theory, and issues of equity and justice will be covered. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • PSYC 6573 – Child and Adolescent Health♦

    (5 cr.) This course covers diseases and disorders in children and adolescents. Topics include diabetes, anorexia, headaches, epilepsy, burn injuries, cystic fibrosis, asthma, addiction, and adolescent obesity. Health promotion for children and adolescents is discussed, including cardiovascular health, nutrition, and exercise. Also covered are insights into special issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder, daily stress, sexually transmitted diseases, sleep disorders, and ethical and legal issues in pediatric and adolescent health psychology.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6574 – Women’s Health♦

    (5 cr.) This course examines healthcare issues in women and girls. Topics include healthy development, trauma, coping, self-esteem, resilience, self-care, well-being, sexual health, relationships, roles, family, schooling, careers, motherhood, transitions, violence, security, bereavement, and positive aging. Note: This course examines healthcare issues in women and girls. Topics include healthy development, trauma, coping, self-esteem, resilience, self-care, well-being, sexual health, relationships, roles, family, schooling, careers, motherhood, transitions, violence, security, bereavement, and positive aging.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6579 – Job Attitudes, Measurement, and Change♦

    (5 cr.) The course will provide an in-depth study of major theories of job attitudes, as well as their antecedents, correlates, and consequences. Topics will include job satisfaction, organizational commitment, organizational citizenship behavior, withdrawal behavior, and counterproductive organizational behavior. Application of learning will be demonstrated through an applied attitude survey research project assignment.

  • PSYC 6700 – Psychology and Social Change♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students analyze and evaluate theories of social and personal change. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application assignments focused on power and social inequalities, ethnic inequalities, global environment, and issues related to gender and sexism, such as homophobia. In addition, students examine the impact of social change theories on children, families, and societies. They explore the concepts of change agent and change advocate as well as the role of the psychologist as change agent. Students also engage in an integrative written assignment to synthesize theories and analyze a current social problem in their community, for which they propose an action to address the issue and drive positive social change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6701 – Culture and Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) This course explores the cultural components, research, and theory of cross-cultural psychology. In addition to the previously listed goals, this course focuses on the impact that culture has on the field of psychology around the world. The scope of this course is broad, with the core theme being cross-cultural psychology (focusing on cultures representing different parts of the world) and comparing cultural influence on human psychology. Many of the topics addressed in the course are related to human development. Additionally, interactions between culture and social behaviors, health, mental health, and mental illnesses are emphasized throughout the duration of this course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6704 – Ethics and Standards of Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) This course examines the psychologist’s principles of conduct, code of ethics, and standards of practice. The guidelines for practice in specific psychological services and with identified populations are explored. The ethical decision-making process is studied in depth. Topics include informed consent, confidentiality, duty to warn, mandated reporting, record keeping, the limits of competency, and dual relationships. The course also addresses issues of professional development, such as supervision, peer consultation, and continuing education.

  • PSYC 6705 – Ethics and Standards of Professional Practice♦

    (5 cr.) What constitutes fraudulent practice and how can psychologists avoid it? In this course, students have the opportunity to answer questions such as this as they examine the psychologists’ principles of conduct, code of ethics, and standards of practice. They identify and analyze the guidelines for practice in specific psychological services and with identified populations, and they assess the ethical, decision-making process. Students engage in weekly discussions on topical issues, including informed consent, confidentiality, duty to warn, mandated reporting, record keeping, the limits of competency, and dual relationships. They also consider the function of professional development, such as supervision, peer consultation, and continuing education, in reaching career goals and acquiring more diverse skill sets.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6706 – Advanced Social Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an advanced analysis of social psychology, including a review of the historical context and cultural grounding of social psychological theory. Students devote special attention to sociocultural psychology and the broad base of knowledge related to history, research methods, and applications to social and cultural processes. They explore and discuss topics related to small-group processes and dynamics and shared cognition, attitude development and shifting, social cognition and emotion, self-concept and self-regulation, conformity, affiliation and independence in groups, group performance, leadership, cross-cultural psychology, and biopsychosocial diversity. Students demonstrate their understanding of theories and concepts through a final analysis of a social problem occurring in their own community for which they propose an intervention to ameliorate the problem. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6245, PSYC 6305, and PSYC 6310.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6710 – Clinical Neuropsychology♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an introduction to the field of clinical neuropsychology—a subfield of psychology that deals with the treatment of patients with injuries to the brain or neurocognitive disorders. Students explore and discuss cortical organization, including functions, anatomy, and neuropathology, and higher cortical functions of memory, language, emotions, attention, and perception in disordered brain functions in adults. They also examine neuropsychological approaches, including cognitive neuropsychology. Students share with their peers assessments of current articles relevant to contemporary issues in neuropsychology. They also apply course concepts through a literature review and final paper on a topic of choice in the field. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6225.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6712 – Clinical Child Neuropsychology♦

    (5 cr.) Neuropsychology is a vast field evolving at a rapid pace. Clinicians working with children must understand the underlying science and core theories, but they must also keep abreast of new research.  Students in this course are introduced to foundations and current literature in clinical child neuropsychology. Students explore and discuss scientific, theoretical, and applied foundations of brain-behavior relations in children with neurological, learning, and/or behavioral disorders. They also engage in assignments focused on multidimensional, ecological, and sociopsychological perspectives relative to prevention, diversity, identification, and intervention with children. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6215 and PSYC 6225.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6718 – Psychology of the Exceptional Individual

    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the cognitive, social-emotional, and psychomotor characteristics of individuals significantly deviating from the norm in behavior and/or adjustment. They learn ways to understand and work with individuals with learning disabilities (including emotional, behavioral, and intellectual disorders; autism; brain injury; hearing and vision loss; physical disabilities; and health disorders) and those who are gifted and talented. Students explore topical issues, including inclusion, transition to adulthood, and multicultural diversity. Through this course, students work toward gaining the knowledge and skills for developing research-based educational and therapeutic interventions.

  • PSYC 6719 – Developmental Psychopathology

    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore formal psychopathology, including emotional and behavioral disorders and classification systems of infants, children, and adolescents. Students examine contrasting models of psychopathology, classification and epidemiology of childhood psychopathology, co-morbidity rates, differential issues from the current diagnostic manual’s outcome of childhood disorders, therapeutic approaches and their efficacy, and developmental resilience. They examine and discuss literature and topics related to assessment, diagnosis, and treatment; a wide range of disorders and disruptive behaviors; and abuse and neglect. Applying course concepts, students assess case studies of diagnostic issues for a contemporary and practical understanding of psychopathology. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6220.) Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • PSYC 6720 – Diagnosis and Assessment♦

    (5 cr.) Students are provided with an overview of what is commonly referred to as abnormal psychology; however, students also consider factors constituting normalcy from multiple perspectives. Students explore the application of diagnostic criteria in various mental health work settings, such as schools, rehabilitation facilities, community agencies, and private practices. Using the scholar-practitioner model, students consider environmental and biological factors contributing to behavioral disorders. Students also examine techniques commonly used for the diagnosis and treatment of cognitive, emotional, and developmental disorders as well as for psychophysiological and psychosocial problems. Though coursework and discussions, students consider multicultural factors that complicate diagnosis as well as current trends and contemporary issues in clinical assessment and diagnosis.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6721 – Advanced Psychopathology♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students engage in an in-depth examination of current theory and research associated with major psychological disorders and their diagnoses. Students explore the primary classification systems in terms of their applicability and limitations as well as the factors that impact the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders along a continuum of mental health. Students engage in practical assignments, focusing on applications of the diagnostic criteria in terms of case conceptualization. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6220.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6722 – Counseling and Psychotherapy Theories♦

    (5 cr.) There are hundreds of therapeutic theories and techniques available to frame the practice of counseling and psychotherapy. An important skill for mental health counselors is to understand the strengths and limitations of these theories to determine which are most appropriate and work best in their own personal practice. In this course, students explore the history of counseling and psychotherapy theories. They examine the major approaches to counseling and psychotherapy in current use, including empirical foundations, advantages, and limitations. Students assess examples of theory-based applications and develop a personal theory of counseling based on theories and techniques assessed in the course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6723 – Multicultural Counseling♦

    (5 cr.) Students are provided with the opportunity to increase their knowledge of multicultural counseling and the delivery of psychological services as well as related skills needed in professional practice. Students explore diversity and identity issues and discuss their impact on the therapeutic relationship. They examine the application of traditional theoretical orientations and current multicultural theories to culturally diverse groups. Through a variety of assignments designed to provide practical application of content, students also investigate counseling concepts related to race and ethnicity, sex and gender, sexual orientation, social class, age, and ability. (Prerequisite(s):Counseling Residency I.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6724 – Child Psychotherapy♦

    (5 cr.) What are some of the special considerations of therapeutic treatment approaches in children? In this course, students have the opportunity to answer this question as they explore the psychological treatment of children from an array of theories and techniques, including play therapy. Students examine and discuss fundamentals and contemporary issues related to playroom organization, intake interviews, psychological assessment, treatment, evaluation, and intervention. They also explore typical play behaviors of children at various levels of development, cross-cultural aspects of play and their meanings as well as issues of cultural sensitivity and ethical practice. Students complete a final written assignment to synthesize course concepts and demonstrate their understanding of child psychotherapy. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6215.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6725 – Group Therapy♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with a comprehensive review of clinical and counseling approaches to group therapy. Students examine the theoretical bases of different approaches to group therapy, including psychoanalytic, existential, person-centered, gestalt, transactional, behavioral, rational-emotive, and reality therapy. Through an in-depth literature review as well as weekly discussions and written assignments, students focus on various types of groups, the efficacy of using group therapy as the treatment method with various multicultural populations, the stages of group development, and related professional and ethical considerations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6726 – Couples and Family Counseling♦

    (5 cr.) An important skill for clinicians is to have a fundamental understanding of the dynamics and functioning of couples and families. Students in this course are introduced to concepts and applications in theoretical perspectives and techniques, classical schools of thought, and recent developments in couples and family therapy. Students explore culture, gender, and ethnicity factors in family development. They also review and compare theoretical frameworks in couples and family therapy, including psychosocial, psychodynamic, transgenerational, strategic, cognitive-behavioral, and social constructionist models. Additionally, students assess the roles of culture, spirituality, and values in understanding families.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6727 – Religion and Spirituality in Counseling and Therapy♦

    (5 cr.) Religious and spiritual movements as well as the interactions and divergences between religion and spirituality are topics that can emerge in counseling or therapy. Professionals must be prepared to discuss these issues and incorporate them into therapy with their clients. In this course, students explore and discuss religious and spiritual values, assessment of religious manifestations, relations with clergy/spiritual leaders, use of bibliographic materials, methods to handle religious/spiritual materials and themes presented by clients, and cultural considerations that may intersect with religion and spirituality related to race, ethnicity, and nationality. Other topics that students consider include sex and gender roles, sexual orientation, and treatment techniques. Employing critical-thinking and scholarly writing skills, students apply concepts to weekly journal assignments and synthesize knowledge into a final paper. Students also reflect on course material to identify their own attitudes toward religion, and they consider how they can address issues of religion and spirituality in a professional context.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6728 – Substance Abuse Counseling♦

    (5 cr.) The impact of substance abuse on the lives of people with addictions, and the lives of their families, makes for a highly complex and challenging area of mental health counseling. Counselors working with these individuals must possess a comprehensive understanding of the background, controversies, and current approaches in regard to the treatment of substance abuse. In this course, students examine psychological aspects of addictions involving alcohol, prescription medications, and illegal substances. They also examine current research in the field of dependency and addiction. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application-based assignments on diagnosing patients, choosing among models of treatment, planning treatment, using group and family treatment plans, and ensuring treatment efficacy. They also consider strategies to promote change, including the trans-theoretical model of behavior change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6729 – Grief Therapy♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine grief theory and related processes, tasks, and mediating factors, including age of the bereaved and deceased, type of death, and relationship with the deceased. They explore coping and coping interventions, dealing with grief in childhood and adolescence, and dealing with grief associated with the loss of children. Students also consider how to address diversity issues related to race, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, sex and gender roles, and spirituality and religion. Students engage in practical assignments that emphasize research-based intervention techniques.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6730 – Advanced Grief Therapy♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore grief dynamics resulting from complicated grief, trauma, multiple loss, and disasters (both natural and human-caused). Students complete multiple assignments, focusing on acute stress and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as well as cultural factors in the assessment and treatment of those diagnosed with PTSD. They further explore content and share perspectives through discussions on related topics, such as homeostasis, prevention interventions, PTSD conceptualizations, character development and attachment theory, memory and information processing, legal and ethical considerations, and additional insights and reflections.(Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6729.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6732 – Medical Crisis Counseling♦

    (5 cr.) Patients and families coping with life-threatening illness often present with acute and chronic stress and psychological issues. In this course, students assess these issues to learn the fundamentals of providing therapy in medical crisis situations. Students explore points of access in the disease process as well as characteristics and treatments of diseases, focusing on appropriate interventions. Additionally, students examine preferential treatment or lack thereof based on social class, visible family/social support, age, race/ethnicity/nationality, sexual orientation, and religion/spirituality. Students apply concepts learned in the course to the review of recent, professional research articles related to counseling patients with medical conditions.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6740 – Disaster, Crisis, and Trauma♦

    (5 cr.) There is no shortage of natural and human-made disasters, such as war, violence, genocide, and terrorist activities. Individuals and communities impacted by such disasters often need assistance from professionals who understand the social, cultural, and psychological complexities of crisis and trauma. Students in this course investigate how these incidents impact the psychology of individuals and groups. They assess traditional and current literature and complete practical exercises to learn about theories of trauma; actions and behaviors following a disaster; stress, coping, and adjustment difficulties; psychological disorders (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder); and available resources to deal with trauma. Considering the various ways crisis professionals can promote positive social change, students devote special attention to the importance and development of culturally appropriate, service-delivery programs and interventions for individuals affected and traumatized by disasters.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • PSYC 6741 – Psychology of Terrorism♦

    (5 cr.) Many sources define terrorism as a type of psychological warfare, as it induces fear and feelings of vulnerability. Therefore, professionals need to understand all aspects of terrorism to help prevent further terroristic acts and respond to victims who have been affected psychologically. Students in this course explore terrorism from a psychological perspective. They examine types of terrorism; contributing factors related to the development of terrorists and terrorist organizations; counterterrorism agencies and laws; the impact of terrorist events on individuals, families, and communities; prevention, intervention, and postvention with survivors; media coverage of terrorist events; human rights and ethical issues; and future trends related to the psychology of terrorism. Students also examine the threat of terrorism in their own community and evaluate the potential impact. Using concepts presented in the course, they consider applications for preventative measures as well as strategies to promote resiliency among individual and families who may become victims of terrorism.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6742 – Conflict, Conflict Resolution, and Peace♦

    (5 cr.) Through this course, students engage in a study of conflict, conflict resolution, and peace from psychological and social psychological perspectives. Students examine the concept of conflict and methods of addressing it, including management, resolution, and transformation; theories related to conflict resolution; approaches to conflict resolution, including negotiation and third-party interventions; and social psychological factors that influence conflict and conflict resolution. They also consider the influence of culture in conflict and conflict resolution; the role of ethics; intractable and international conflicts; the concept of peace; and how third-party approaches can contribute to the peace process. Students apply conflict resolution approaches to conflicts at all levels, from interpersonal to those involving whole nations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6743 – Psychopharmacology♦

    (5 cr.) Psychologists working in psychopharmacotherapy are responsible for having in-depth knowledge of psychiatric disorders and psychotropic medications prescribed to treat these disorders. Students in this course are provided with an overview of the spectrum of psychotropic medications and their use in the treatment of mental and behavioral disorders. Students explore the role of the psychologist in prescribing medication and the efficacy of combining medication and psychotherapy. They also engage in discussions focused on the treatment of depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, obsessive-compulsive behavior, schizophrenia, and childhood disorders; and other psychological disorders as described in the DSM-IV-TR. Students practice scholarly-writing skills in APA style through a final research paper on a topic of interest related to psychopharmacology. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6225.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6744 – Psychopathology♦

    (5 cr.) This course provides an in-depth examination of current theory and research associated with major psychological disorders and their diagnosis. The primary classification systems are explored in terms of their applicability and limitations. The factors that impact the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders along a continuum of mental health are explored. Application of the diagnostic criteria in terms of case conceptualization is emphasized.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6745 – Health Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) Health psychologists work toward positive change in healthcare and health behavior through the study of relationships between patients and providers, how individuals and groups adapt to illness, damaging health behaviors, health cognitions, and many other related issues. In this course students explore the field of health psychology with a focus on the biopsychosocial model. They discuss behavioral and biomedical theories as well as the effect of psychological (personality), behavioral (health behaviors and coping), and social factors (stress and physician-patient relationships) on physical health and wellness. Through the examination of current literature and peer discussions, students explore and address issues related to cardiovascular and immune health, including heart disease, stroke, cancer, and HIV/AIDS. They demonstrate their understanding of course material and consider how topics apply to their personal and professional life through the development of taskforce papers, a health brochure, and a final essay.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6746 – Behavioral Nutrition♦

    (5 cr.) Providing patients with positive support and information about nutritional choices can often alleviate symptoms of disease as well as mitigate the need for further therapeutic or medicinal treatment. Students in this course explore the interaction between behavior and nutrition. They examine the fundamental principles of human digestion and nutrient metabolism, specific nutrient requirements of the brain and brain metabolism of nutrients, and effects of nutrients on brain function. Applying these principles, students critically examine and discuss current trends in behavioral nutrition and conduct nutritional assessments. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6225.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6747 – Psychoneuroimmunology♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the current theory and interdisciplinary (psychological and medical) research associated with psychoneuroimmunology (PNI). Topics include the mind/body interaction, its effects on overall health through modulation of the immune system, and mind/body interventions. Students explore recent advances in medical science that have contributed to the knowledge of biological processes and how the mind can be used as a potent force in modifying the biological mechanisms involved in wellness and illness.  (Prerequisite(s):PSYC 6225 or 8226 and PSYC 6748 or 8748.)
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6748 – Stress and Coping♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine contemporary theories on the perception of stress, appraisal of stressors, ways of coping, and the psychophysiological mechanisms involved in the stress response. They explore topical issues, including psychoneuroimmunology, behavioral nutrition, psychophysiology, traumatic stress, chronic pain, and stress-related psychophysiological and medical disorders as they relate to stress and coping. Students engage in discussions designed to provide practical application of course content. Demonstrating breadth and depth of knowledge and critical-thinking skills, students explore a topic of interest through a final research proposal and paper on a current issue related to course concepts. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6225.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6749 – Foundations of Industrial/Organizational Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) This course introduces students to the field of industrial/organizational psychology. The major focus is on organizational theories and practices impacting the individual, group, and organization in a variety of industrial and organizational settings. Students learn to translate research and theory into practice in areas such as personnel selection, training, performance, and management, as well as in team and organizational development and change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6750 – Leadership Development♦

    (5 cr.) An understanding of the psychological principles of leader development often enhances leadership skills and ability to influence others to work toward common goals. In this course, students examine the psychology of leadership and leader development through cross-cultural, social, psychological, and political contexts. They identify and assess the psychological theories of leadership, leadership styles, qualities of great leaders, global leadership competencies, and instruments used to assess leadership and leadership potential. Students apply these psychological theories to assess and develop their own capacity for leadership.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • PSYC 6751 – Leadership Coaching: Process and Practice♦

    (5 cr.) The intent of leadership coaching is to facilitate psychological change that leads to goal attainment and enhanced performance. In this course, students apply evidence-based psychological approaches to coaching case studies. They assess coaching roles and settings; skills and competencies; models and frameworks; and current issues and future trends. Students employ critical-thinking skills and synthesize concepts learned in the course to develop a plan for implementing effective coaching in a real-world setting.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6752 – Leadership Coaching: Application♦

    (5 cr.) The intent of leadership coaching is to facilitate psychological change that leads to goal attainment and enhanced performance. In this course, students apply evidence-based psychological approaches to coaching case studies. They assess coaching roles and settings; skills and competencies; models and frameworks; and current issues and future trends. Students employ critical-thinking skills and synthesize concepts learned in the course to develop a plan for implementing effective coaching in a real-world setting.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6753 – Career Counseling

    (5 cr.) This course examines major career development theories, assumptions, and implications for practice. Career information programs and systems in terms of their application to personnel assessment, counseling, development, and placement are reviewed. Focus is placed on the implications of individual differences in cultural, gender, and age-related issues. Students obtain a theoretical and practical basis for supporting individuals in vocation selection and career development.

  • PSYC 6754 – Personnel Psychology in the Workplace♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore the application of psychological theory and practice to human resources activities in organizations. They examine related topics, including job analysis and design, employee selection and placement, training and development, performance management and appraisal, and legal and ethical considerations in human resources management. Through a group project case study, students research, assess, and share critical issues in personnel psychology. They also demonstrate their ability to conduct effective research and review literature through a final research paper on a topic of interest related to course content and theory.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6755 – Leadership and the Process of Change♦

    (5 cr.) Effective leadership requires the ability to facilitate positive change, lead others in efforts to effect similar change, and work through challenges when met with resistance to change. Students in this course are provided with an extensive overview of leadership theories. Students explore definitions of leadership, major theoretical leadership models, and contextual and situational factors related to leadership and change. Students also examine various perspectives on leadership and the role of leadership in the achievement of organizational, group, and team goals. Students engage in practical assignments and discussions, focusing on effective leadership issues and practices during the process of organizational change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6756 – International/Cross-Cultural Issues in Organizations♦

    (5 cr.) International and cross-cultural factors often influence organizational, group, and team processes and functions. Students in this course examine workplace issues arising from diverse cultural contexts. Students explore international and cultural comparisons of work motivation, communication, leadership, and decision making as well as organizational structures and characteristics. They examine sources, management of conflict, and conflict resolution strategies. Students also have the opportunity to gain practical insight as they assess and present to the class an international or cross-cultural issue in an organization.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6758 – Psychology of Organizational Behavior

    (5 cr.) This course examines the application of behavioral theories in organizational settings. The focus is on individual, group, and organizational behavior. Topics include individual differences in employee motivation and job satisfaction, group development, team building, organizational leadership, and organizational design, culture, and development. Students acquire a broad knowledge base in organizational psychology, its research, and its applications. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6749.)

  • PSYC 6760 – Psychology and the Media♦

    (5 cr.) In an age of technological innovation and virtual spread of knowledge, there are many different types of media, which often affect individuals, groups, and cultures. Students in this course explore the psychological impact of the media as it relates to violence, prosocial behaviors, sex and pornography, advertising, news and politics, special populations, and culture and the global community. They also examine legal and ethical issues related to psychology and the media as well as the impact of the media on social change. Students engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of content on media psychology, the effects of media violence and pornography, the impact of advertising, news manipulation, global disasters, and other applicable topics.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • PSYC 6761 – The Psychological Impact of Film and Television♦

    (5 cr.) Film and television can have a major impact on society as they help us to understand our history, current culture, social norms, and personal interactions. In this course, students examine this impact on cognitions, attitudes, emotions, physiology, and behaviors. They explore and discuss the psychological impact of creative production elements, including cinematography, music, editing, timing, and sequencing; agenda setting, priming, and framing; propaganda; celebrities; the televising of sports; and portrayals and representations of various cultural groups and professions. Students also examine techniques used to develop media literacy, and they consider how film and television can elicit social action.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6762 – The Psychological Impact of the Internet and Mobile Technologies♦

    (5 cr.) The Internet and mobile technologies have increased the immediacy and accessibility of information and have provided a global platform for the expression of creativity and new ideas. Students in this course explore how the Internet and mobile technologies affect how people think, view the world, gain information, and record and interpret history. They examine and discuss the use of the Internet and mobile technologies for socialization, entertainment, news and information, terrorism, politics, commerce and advertising, health, education, and work. Applying course concepts and theories, students demonstrate knowledge through a final paper or presentation in which they examine how the Internet and mobile technologies psychologically impact their personal lives and the lives of their family and friends.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6763 – Principles of Instructional Design♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are presented with an overview and critical analysis of various instructional methods and techniques, including their historical, psychological, and social foundations. Students analyze specific instructional applications in various settings and through multiple theories of learning, such as behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, and social-situational. They apply prior knowledge of learning, development, and cognition to understand these applications. Students also consider and discuss the major challenges affecting curriculum design as well as potential future trends. Demonstrating understanding of course concepts, students critically analyze and present current issues in instructional design through collaborative projects. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6235 and PSYC 6765.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6764 – Instructional Design for Online Course Development♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore instructional design and delivery of online courses, issues related to assessment, evaluation in a distance-learning environment, and appropriate and systematic use of technology in online learning venues. Addressing course objectives and discussion questions, students explore and assess issues related to learning styles and instructional strategies in the online environment as well as alternatives to the online lecture. Students gain hands-on experience developing components for online instruction using course concepts and best practices in the field. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6763.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6765 – Educational Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the variables related to teaching and learning to understand how educational psychologists contribute to teacher effectiveness, student motivation, and overall academic achievement. They assess teaching methods, learning environments, curriculum development, educational achievement, and characteristics of teachers and learners. They also explore educational assessment, environmental issues, and educational research techniques. Students complete an article summary through which they explain the rationale, methods, findings, and implications of a current research issue. Sharing their topical summaries with the class, students gain multiple perspectives and make connections within the field of educational psychology.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6766 – Teaching of Psychology♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine techniques and issues related to teaching psychology at the college/university level. They examine aspects of the adult development process, teaching skills, rapport with students, and course and classroom management. Students also explore classroom communication and ethical issues relevant to both instructors and students. Demonstrating their knowledge and communicating perspectives, students complete writing assignments on topics related to teaching psychology. They also have the opportunity to gain practical experience and constructive feedback as they lead discussions, assign grades, and evaluate other student teachers.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6770 – Public Policy Implications of Terrorism Legislation and Policies

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to develop a broad perspective on the history of the U.S. Patriot Act, terroristic legislation and immigration laws, and their policy implications on law enforcement, governmental entities, organizations, and individuals. Students gain a foundation to build the skills that public administrators and public policy analysts use to draft and implement public policy and enforce and/or respond to potential terroristic threats while simultaneously upholding and protecting constitutional freedoms. Students examine topics through a wide variety of resources, including contemporary texts, websites, case studies, and material representing international, national, and local governments and organizations. They critically review and analyze the U.S. Patriot Act and similar terroristic 297 legislation and policies, and they participate in discussions about these laws and their implications on U.S. constitutional freedoms.

  • PSYC 6771 – Terrorism: A Systemic Approach for Emergency Preparedness

    (5 cr.) Terrorism continues to be a constant threat to the American public, facilitating the need for accurate information, organized resources, and established approaches to respond to emergencies and keep the public informed. Students in this course examine terrorism and related public policy on a local, national, and international level. They also assess the need and function of systemic approaches for emergency preparedness. Students explore and discuss topical issues, such as terrorism and public health, bioterrorism, biosecurity, cyber terrorism, risk assessment, implications for public health, and components of a systemic preparedness infrastructure. Using analytic skills and tools, students assess recommendations that policy makers use in decisions to prevent or respond to terrorism. They also gain hands-on experience initiating the development and/or analysis of a terrorism-preparedness infrastructure. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • PSYC 6772 – Critical Incident Planning and Leadership

    (5 cr.) Who is responsible for emergency management and what elements should be included in an emergency management plan? Students in this course have the opportunity to answer such questions as they examine the principles of emergency planning, selection of leaders, specialized planning (e.g., schools, tourism), mutual aid, and leadership theories. Students analyze case studies, identifying weaknesses in current methods as well as potential solutions. Through this analysis, students develop new strategies and perspectives in regard to responding to and planning for critical incidents. This course provides a basic foundation for public administrators or students planning to enter the field of public administration to develop a critical incident plan and gain a thorough understanding of leadership models and methods.

  • PSYC 6775 – Strategic Context of Public Management and Leadership

    (5 cr.) Public policy implementation can take place in either a public organization, a private one, a nonprofit one, or a combined or networked one. This course engages learners in a collaborative study of the changing strategic context of public administration as they apply a strategic planning and management approach to the implementation of public policy. Learners are introduced to planning, management, financial management, performance management, and contracting processes in the organization whose purpose it is to implement public policy.

  • PSYC 6776 – Transformative Change in a Shared-Power World

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are engaged in a collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students explore and employ a pragmatic-action-learning process for studying the experience of transformative change in complex systems. They examine the dynamics of complex adaptive systems to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Students explore and apply appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change to a positive organizational-change situation of personal interest. They also have the opportunity to develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.

  • PSYC 6777 – Essentials of Public Health: A Case Study Approach♦

    (5 cr.) Natural and human-caused disasters continue to affect society, facilitating the need for professionals who possess an overarching understanding of the foundational concepts of public health as well as knowledge of awareness and preparedness. Students in this course evaluate key aspects of public health, including its history, mission, essential services, core functions, infrastructure, resources, workforce, achievements, challenges, and career options. They explore these facets through case studies, hypothetical scenarios, and journal articles. Although the main focus of this course is on the public health system in the United States, students also address global issues and views of public health on a global level.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6778 – Social, Behavioral, and Cultural Factors in Public Health♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students identify and analyze the major social, behavioral, and cultural variables and issues that affect the health of populations, including community, gender, age, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, environment, and behavioral risks. Students also explore research, theoretical, and conceptual frameworks from the social and behavioral sciences. They apply these frameworks and other theories presented in the course to intervention strategies or program initiatives that address current public health problems and reduce health disparities. Through a final paper and critique, students demonstrate their understanding of content presented in the course, share ideas and perspectives, and provide feedback to peers.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PSYC 6780 – Seminar in School Psychology

    (5 cr.) Prospective school psychologists are introduced to the field of school psychology in this course. Students explore a variety of related topics, including the role and function of the school psychologist; legal, ethical, and professional issues; fieldwork experiences; research methods; and emerging technologies. They apply concepts learned in the course to a personal plan to prepare for certification in school psychology. Sharpening creative and critical-thinking skills, students also develop fact sheets on topics relevant to the psychological well-being of children and adolescents.

  • PSYC 6781 – Psychopathology From a Clinical Perspective♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an in-depth examination of current theory and research associated with major psychological disorders and their diagnosis. The primary classification systems are explored in terms of their applicability and limitations. The factors that impact the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders along a continuum of mental health are explored. Application of the diagnostic criteria in terms of case conceptualization is emphasized.

  • PUBH 6035 – Epidemiology: Decoding the Science of Public Health♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an epidemiological approach to the study of the incidence, prevalence, and patterns of disease and injury in populations, and the application of this study to the control of public health problems. Key sources of data for epidemiological purposes are identified, and principles and limitations of public health screening programs are addressed. Students learn to calculate basic epidemiological measures and to draw appropriate inferences from epidemiological data and reports.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 6101 – Principles of Communication in Public Health

    (2 cr.) Through this course, students work toward developing the written, oral, and online communication skills needed for success as scholar-practitioners and as public health professionals. Students learn theory and strategy-based communication principles for effectively disseminating public health information to varying audiences. They explore risk communication, communication program planning, problem analysis, audience analysis, message strategies, media channels, and the impact of media on public health. Students also engage in a variety of discussion and application-based activities focused on scholarly writing, critical thinking, professional goal setting, and academic integrity in publications and research. Note: It is recommended that this course be taken concurrently with PUBH 6002.

  • PUBH 6115 – Social, Behavioral, and Cultural Factors in Public Health♦

    (4 cr.) In this course, students identify and analyze the major social, behavioral, and cultural variables and issues that affect the health of populations, including community, gender, age, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, environment, and behavioral risks. Students also explore research, theoretical, and conceptual frameworks from the social and behavioral sciences. They apply these frameworks and other theories presented in the course to intervention strategies or program initiatives that address current public health problems and reduce health disparities. Through a final paper and critique, students demonstrate their understanding of content presented in the course, share ideas and perspectives, and provide feedback to peers.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 6125 – Biostatistics♦

    (4 cr.) Students in this course address the application and interpretation of biostatistics in public health research and practice, including descriptive methodologies, statistical inference and probability, analysis of variance, and simple linear regression. Students are introduced to a statistical computer package such as SPSS.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • PUBH 6127 – Public Health Policy, Politics and Progress♦

    (5 cr.)

  • PUBH 6127 – Public Health Policy, Politics and Progress♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the role of federal, state, and local government in the assurance of public health through health policy and law.  Consideration is given to contemporary policy, law, and regulatory issues arising in public health practice, as well as to the economics and financing of public health programs.  The advocacy, political, and creative process in the formulation, implementation, and modification of health policy are examined and discussed.  Students also learn how to write and structure a health policy analysis.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 6128 – Biological Foundations of Public Health♦

    (5 cr.) A foundation in basic science and critical thinking informs the core areas of public health. Students explore the biological and physical underpinnings of the human body in health and disease states, and they investigate the microbiological, physical, behavioral, and environmental causes of common diseases from a public health perspective.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 6129 – Global Perspectives on Health♦

    (5 cr.) Students are introduced to current public health issues and challenges affecting vulnerable populations around the globe. Particular emphasis is given to the social and economic determinants of health and possible intervention strategies for addressing the global burden of diseases. Students can learn about organizations that work to support and advance health locally and internationally and compare health systems around the globe. Students can also analyze global health ethics, examine international health-related goals, and explore health communication and other strategies for social change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 6135 – Leadership, Professionalism, and Ethics in Public Health Practice♦

    (4 cr.) Critical issues, such as infectious diseases, inadequate healthcare access, and an aging population, require leaders who have a diverse skill set as well as the professional and ethical sensibilities needed to lead efforts that improve quality of life for individuals and communities. In this course, students examine theories of leadership as well as the professional attributes, skills, styles, and strategies required to advance public health goals. They explore ethical choices, values, professionalism, opportunities for advocacy, and the application of principles of social justice implicit in public health decisions and practice. Students learn how to employ collaborative methods for working with and motivating diverse communities and constituencies, and they consider methods and develop new strategies for evaluating and solving current problems in healthcare.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 6145 – Epidemiology♦

    (4 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an epidemiological approach to the study of the incidence, prevalence, and patterns of disease and injury in populations, and the application of this study to the control of public health problems. Key sources of data for epidemiological purposes are identified, and principles and limitations of public health screening programs are addressed. Students learn to calculate basic epidemiological measures and to draw appropriate inferences from epidemiological data and reports. (Prerequisite(s): PUBH 6125.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 6155 – Research in Public Health♦

    (4 cr.) Public health professionals use the results of research in many ways, including in the development of programs and interventions designed to enhance the health of communities as well as to demonstrate the efficacy of programs to stakeholders who provide funding. Students in this course engage in an examination of the research that informs public health programs, policy, and practice. Students examine the logic that underlies scientific research; study design; sampling; identification of variables; methods of data collection and analysis; key concepts in measurement, including reliability and validity; program evaluation; and research ethics. Students also explore the methods of participatory research as well as statistical software used to support research. Gaining practical experience, students develop a research manuscript through which they engage in an integrative literature review and analyze and apply various components of research, including data sets; study designs, variables and measurements, participants; data analysis; and strategies and skills for presentation of research. (Prerequisite(s):PUBH 6125 and PUBH 6145.) Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 6165 – Environmental Health♦

    (4 cr.) TEST–Did you receive this?

  • PUBH 6170 – Public Health Biology♦

    (4 cr.) Public health officials are better equipped to plan effective public health programs if they have a fundamental understanding of how people contract disease as well as how their bodies resist disease and toxins. In this course, students explore the implications of advances in biology on approaches to public health practice. Students explore the biological and molecular basis of public health; ethical issues related to public health biology; the effects of genetics and genomics on health and disease; the application of biological principles and behavioral theories to disease prevention, control, and management programs; and the role of the immune system in individual and population health. Students also engage in practical exercises on anatomical and pathophysiological processes, including those involved in the regulation of food intake, energy, homeostasis, and metabolism.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 6175 – Health Policy and Management♦

    (4 cr.) Methods for influencing and improving health outcomes of individuals and populations are at the forefront of health policy and management. With this in mind, the Department of Health and Human Services launched a national, comprehensive plan—Healthy People 2010—designed to promote health and prevent disease. Students in this course expand on these goals to develop a solid foundation for understanding the need for effective health policy and management and the role of the public health professional charged with influencing local, state, and federal policy. Students identify and assess components of organization, financing, and delivery of health services and systems in the United States. They engage in a variety of contextual and practical assignments focused on management theories, policy processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. Students also consider the impact of global trends on public health practice, policy, and systems.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 6227 – Health Informatics Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams

    (4 cr.) Information technology (IT) in public health practice has many functions, one of which is the dissemination of important information about disease and disease prevention, which organizations use in the management of critical issues in public health. Students in this course examine the various applications of IT in public health practice to access, interpret, and evaluate data that supports decision making and effective communication. They examine legal and ethical principles in the dissemination of information in public health settings as well as the use of informatics methods and resources as strategic tools to promote public health. Students also explore the collaborative approach to the design, implementation, and evaluation of informatics programs. Through the analysis of various case studies, students sharpen their critical-thinking and decision-making skills while gaining an understanding of the various phases of informatics project development, information architecture, and immunization registry. They also engage in practical exercises on information systems evaluation, IT personnel management, and procurement and requests for proposals (RFPs).
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 6235 – Program Design, Planning, and Evaluation♦

    (4 cr.) The focus of this is on the competencies required of the public health professional in planning for the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of community health promotion and disease prevention initiatives. Attention is given to needs assessment and the social, behavioral, environmental, biological, and economic factors that contribute to health outcomes. Strategic approaches to planning, implementation, and evaluation including cost-benefit analysis are addressed. Health behavior theories are considered in the development of educational programs, the application of evaluation findings, and prioritization of community concerns and resources.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 6245 – Applied Research in Public Health♦

    (5 cr.) The goal of this course is to provide participants with an understanding of theories, principles, strategies and alternative methods of applied research (quantitative, qualitative, and/or mixed-method designs) in public health focusing on culturally sensitive, appropriate literacy level and appropriate community engagement through participatory action research and collaborative inquiry of community-based participatory research, an appreciation of advantages and limitations of this approach, and skills necessary for participating effectively in CBPR projects.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 6260 – Legal and Regulatory Aspects of Public Health♦

    (2 cr.) A major responsibility of public health professionals is to maintain balance between individual rights and the wellbeing of communities. To do this, they must understand the ethical, social, and legal issues surrounding the public health arena. Students in this course explore these concepts while examining the role of federal, state, and local government in the assurance of public health through legislation and regulation. Students investigate contemporary legal and regulatory issues arising in public health practice and emergencies, and they assess public health security and preparedness in response to bioterrorism and disasters. They also discuss the impact of cost, benefits, legal factors, and other considerations on ethical research and practice. Through the application of theories and concepts assessed in the course, students propose potential solutions to current public health issues.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 6475 – Program Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation♦

    (5 cr.) This course promotes competency in strategic planning, program planning and design, implementation, and evaluation. It provides an overview of public health program planning and development, as well as needs and assets assessment. It focuses on the methods required to develop a strategic plan, linking it to implementing programs and evaluating their efficacy. Students discuss the administration and coordination of public health program interventions and activities, and  explore the variety of methods used to facilitate public health research (quantitative, qualitative and/or mixed methods) in practice settings.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 6635 – Practicum I: Field Experience in Public Health

    (4 cr.) Students in the practicum are provided with the opportunity to apply and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired throughout their program of study and to further develop key professional competencies. Students engage in a field experience in a select public health setting, which they align to their academic and professional goals. Supervision by an on-site preceptor is a critical component of the practicum. The on-site supervisor and the course instructor monitor and evaluate students’ performance throughout the entire practicum experience. This course requires students to complete 240 hours of practicum work. They must also participate in an accompanying online seminar course and begin to develop an ePortfolio based on assigned professional development activities.

  • PUBH 6636 – Practicum II: Capstone Experience in Public Health

    (4 cr.) This course is the continuation of PUBH 6635 – Practicum I: Field Experience in Public Health. The capstone experience is an opportunity for students to demonstrate their mastery of principles, concepts, and content presented throughout the program and through their practicum field experience. In this course, students complete their ePortfolio based on their field experience and develop a substantive written paper or project. Students also engage in group discussions during which they consider career development plans, reflect on the promotion of social change, and exchange feedback on final portfolio work and lessons learned.

  • PUBH 6638 – Practicum I: Field Experience in Public Health

    (3 cr.) Students in the practicum are provided with the opportunity to apply and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired throughout their program of study and to further develop key professional competencies. Students engage in a field experience in an approved public health setting, which they align to their academic and professional goals. Supervision by an on-site preceptor is a critical component of the practicum. The on-site supervisor and the course instructor monitor and evaluate students’ performance throughout the entire practicum experience.  In this first course of the two-part practicum, students are required to complete a minimum 100 of the total 200 required hours of practicum work. Students also participate in the accompanying online course and begin to develop an eportfolio based on assigned professional development activities
    (Co-requisites: PUBH 6245

  • PUBH 6639 – Practicum II: Field Experience and Applied Project in Public Health

    (3 cr.) This course is the continuation and extension of PUBH 6635 – Practicum I: Field Experience in Public Health. Students complete the remainder of their required 200 hours of practicum work, participate in the accompanying online course and complete the eportfolio of their field experience.  Students also develop their applied public health project (see PUBH 6245 course description for further explanation of the project).—Note, time spent on developing the project is expected to be above and beyond the 200 hours devoted to actual practicum work. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • PUBH 6640 – Seminar: Applied Project in Public Health Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams

    (2 cr.) As a culminating experience, MPH students are provided the opportunity to demonstrate their ability to synthesize and integrate advanced knowledge and skills acquired throughout the program and to apply theory and principles in a public health project focused on social change. For this project, students write a grant proposal for a public health initiative or create a community health program plan. The project must address the need(s) of a specific population in the student’s field site community. Students are also required to describe how the MPH Program competencies/learning outcomes were demonstrated while carrying out the project as well as how their project relates to social change.(Prerequisite(s): PUBH 6638
    (Co-requisites: PUBH 6639

  • PUBH 8002 – Essentials of Public Health: A Case Study Approach♦

    (4 cr.) Natural and human-caused disasters continue to affect society, facilitating the need for professionals who possess an overarching understanding of the foundational concepts of public health as well as knowledge of awareness and preparedness. Students in this course evaluate key aspects of public health, including its history, mission, essential services, core functions, infrastructure, resources, workforce, achievements, challenges, and career options. They explore these facets through case studies, hypothetical scenarios, and journal articles. Although the main focus of this course is on the public health system in the United States, students also address global issues and views of public health on a global level.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8003 – Building a Multidisciplinary Approach to Health♦

    (2 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and the requirements for successfully participating in an online curriculum, and provided with a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. The focus of course assignments is on the practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and the integration of professional practice with professional and academic excellence as they relate to practice in public health.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8005 – Foundations for Graduate Study♦

    (1 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and the requirements for successfully participating in an online curriculum, and provided with a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. The focus of course assignments is on the practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and the integration of professional practice with professional and academic excellence as they relate to practice in public health.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8010 – Promoting Population Health♦

    (5 cr.) This course concentrates on the social foundations for public health and the leadership and research skills needed for effectively organizing and conducting population-based disease prevention and health promotion programs. Topics include the social history of public health; determinants and risk factors for population health; policy analysis and advocacy; building coalitions, alliances, and consortiums; constituency and community mobilization; media communications; social marketing; community education strategies; and diverse populations as well as those with disproportionate disease burdens.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8015 – Administration and Leadership of Public Health Programs♦

    (5 cr.) Strong, knowledgeable leaders and administrators are important forces behind the policies and programs designed to improve population health. In this course, students examine the administration of population-based health programs and the leadership skills needed to work effectively with diverse workforces and communities under varying political and economic conditions. They explore and discuss a variety of topics, including organizational dynamics, team building, mediation, collaboration, systems thinking and planning, working within political structures, responding to political and economic forces, communicating about public health issues, budgeting, funding proposal development, and grants management. Students engage in an in-depth analysis of leadership, including a self-assessment to determine and reflect on their leadership development, and they apply course concepts and theories to case studies of real-world public health programs and related challenges. They also to develop a program evaluation research proposal to further assess the characteristics of effective programs.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • PUBH 8020 – Public Health Informatics♦

    (5 cr.) There are many potential applications, benefits, and opportunities for improving the management of healthcare through the use of information technology (IT). In this course, students focus on the application of information technology to various functions of public health, focusing on decision making. Students explore database design, data storage, architecture, and computer networking for integration of database systems. They also examine the use of medical and financial records for disease surveillance; standards for the collection, recording, and transmission of personal data; use of geographic information systems for mapping disease and risk factors; and methods for the evaluation of public health information systems. Students demonstrate knowledge of course concepts through written assessments and analyses of public health informatics case studies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8030 – Socioecological Perspectives on Health♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students identify and discuss social and ecological perspectives of public health including individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, societal, and public policy factors. Students explore and apply the socioecological model (SEM) and other theoretical frameworks that aim to address current public health problems and reduce health disparities, morbidity, and mortality. Students demonstrate understanding of course concepts through peer discussion and through researching and describing a specific health issue in a community, discussing the contributing factors, and proposing an appropriate intervention.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8031 – Public Health Administration and Leadership♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students are provided with a foundational understanding of the administrative, managerial, and organizational practices of public health and healthcare delivery systems. Students examine theories of leadership as well as the professional attributes, skills, styles, and strategies required to advance public health goals. They engage in a variety of contextual and practical assignments focused on management theories, policy processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. Students also consider the impact of global trends on public health practice, policy, and systems.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8032 – SPSS Revealed

    (1 cr.) This is a laboratory-type course where students learn the skills needed to use the statistical computer package SPSS in public health practice and research. Topics include importation of data, management of various types of data, creation and exportation of tables and graphs, and computation of basic statistical tests using SPSS.
    Note: Lab

  • PUBH 8033 – Interpretation and Application of Public Health Data♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn about biostatistical methods and concepts used in public health practice and research. Emphasis is placed on interpretation and application of concepts rather than statistical calculations. Major topics include identification of types of data, creation and interpretation of narrative and graphical descriptive statistics, conceptualization of statistical inference and probability, and interpretation of common nonparametric tests, analysis of variance, and simple linear regression models. Students are required to use the statistical computer package SPSS.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8034 – Environmental Health: Local to Global♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are offered a comprehensive overview of environmental factors that affect the health and safety of a community. Students examine causal links between chemical, physical, and biological hazards in the environment and their impact on health. They also explore the genetic, physiologic, and psychosocial factors that influence environmentally compromised health outcomes. Students investigate environmental risk assessment methods; strategies for effective management and control of environmental exposures; and legal, regulatory, and ethical considerations at the federal, state, and local levels. Using theories and methods presented in the course, students assess current solutions and consider new ways to address environmental threats, such as waste, water, air, vectors, and global warming as well as issues related to bioterrorism and disaster preparedness and management.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8035 – Epidemiology: Decoding the Science of Public Health♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an epidemiological approach to the study of the incidence, prevalence, and patterns of disease and injury in populations, and the application of this study to the control of public health problems. Key sources of data for epidemiological purposes are identified, and principles and limitations of public health screening programs are addressed. Students learn to calculate basic epidemiological measures and to draw appropriate inferences from epidemiological data and reports.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8050 – Global Health and Issues in Disease Prevention♦

    (5 cr.) An in-depth review of how population-based strategies are used in the prevention of disease and disability is provided to students in this course. Students explore the topics of population health and disease prevention from the perspective of understanding the determinants of health. Using a cross-disciplinary approach, students examine how economics, social factors, health policy, urbanization, globalization, the environment, and other factors influence disease. Students consider how research in disease prevention, health determinants, and population health applies to public and community health efforts.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • PUBH 8101 – Principles of Communication in Public Health

    (2 cr.) Through this course, students work toward developing the written, oral, and online communication skills needed for success as scholar-practitioners and as public health professionals. Students learn theory and strategy-based communication principles for effectively disseminating public health information to varying audiences. They explore risk communication, communication program planning, problem analysis, audience analysis, message strategies, media channels, and the impact of media on public health. Students also engage in a variety of discussion and application-based activities focused on scholarly writing, critical thinking, professional goal setting, and academic integrity in publications and research. Note: It is recommended that this course be taken concurrently with PUBH 8002.

  • PUBH 8115 – Social, Behavioral, and Cultural Factors in Public Health♦

    (4 cr.) In this course, students identify and analyze the major social, behavioral, and cultural variables and issues that affect the health of populations, including community, gender, age, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, environment, and behavioral risks. Students also explore research, theoretical, and conceptual frameworks from the social and behavioral sciences. They apply these frameworks and other theories presented in the course to intervention strategies or program initiatives that address current public health problems and reduce health disparities. Through a final paper and critique, students demonstrate their understanding of content presented in the course, share ideas and perspectives, and provide feedback to peers.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8125 – Biostatistics♦

    (4 cr.) Students in this course address the application and interpretation of biostatistics in public health research and practice, including descriptive methodologies, statistical inference and probability, analysis of variance, and simple linear regression. Students are introduced to a statistical computer package such as SPSS.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8130 – Communications, Marketing, and Public Relations for Public Health Leaders♦

    (5 cr.) An overview of marketing and public relations principles as they relate to public health, highlighting theoretical concepts that are commonly used in health communications research, is provided to students in this course. Topics include using social marketing techniques, promoting health literacy, developing community partnerships, and creating culturally sensitive and appropriate promotional materials. Students focus on using social media to identify and advance public health interests and ethical principles. Through case studies, students examine how they can use marketing practices to translate health research into social action and behavioral change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8135 – Leadership, Professionalism, and Ethics in Public Health Practice♦

    (4 cr.) Critical issues, such as infectious diseases, inadequate healthcare access, and an aging population, require leaders who have a diverse skill set as well as the professional and ethical sensibilities needed to lead efforts that improve quality of life for individuals and communities. In this course, students examine theories of leadership as well as the professional attributes, skills, styles, and strategies required to advance public health goals. They explore ethical choices, values, professionalism, opportunities for advocacy, and the application of principles of social justice implicit in public health decisions and practice. Students learn how to employ collaborative methods for working with and motivating diverse communities and constituencies, and they consider methods and develop new strategies for evaluating and solving current problems in healthcare.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8145 – Epidemiology♦

    (4 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an epidemiological approach to the study of the incidence, prevalence, and patterns of disease and injury in populations, and the application of this study to the control of public health problems. Key sources of data for epidemiological purposes are identified, and principles and limitations of public health screening programs are addressed. Students learn to calculate basic epidemiological measures and to draw appropriate inferences from epidemiological data and reports. (Prerequisite(s): PUBH 8125.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8155 – Research in Public Health♦

    (4 cr.) Public health professionals use the results of research in many ways, including in the development of programs and interventions designed to enhance the health of communities as well as to demonstrate the efficacy of programs to stakeholders who provide funding. Students in this course engage in an examination of the research that informs public health programs, policy, and practice. Students examine the logic that underlies scientific research; study design; sampling; identification of variables; methods of data collection and analysis; key concepts in measurement, including reliability and validity; program evaluation; and research ethics. Students also explore the methods of participatory research as well as statistical software used to support research. Gaining practical experience, students develop a research manuscript through which they engage in an integrative literature review and analyze and apply various components of research, including data sets; study designs, variables and measurements, participants; data analysis; and strategies and skills for presentation of research. (Prerequisite(s):PUBH 8125 and PUBH 8145.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8165 – Environmental Health♦

    (4 cr.) Students in this course are offered a comprehensive overview of environmental factors that affect the health and safety of a community. Students examine causal links between chemical, physical, and biological hazards in the environment and their impact on health. They also explore the genetic, physiologic, and psychosocial factors that influence environmentally compromised health outcomes. Students investigate environmental risk assessment methods; strategies for effective management and control of environmental exposures; and legal, regulatory, and ethical considerations at the federal, state, and local levels. Using theories and methods presented in the course, students assess current solutions and consider new ways to address environmental threats, such as waste, water, air, vectors, and global warming as well as issues related to bioterrorism and disaster preparedness and management.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8175 – Health Policy and Management♦

    (4 cr.) Methods for influencing and improving health outcomes of individuals and populations are at the forefront of health policy and management. With this in mind, the Department of Health and Human Services launched a national, comprehensive plan—Healthy People 2010—designed to promote health and prevent disease. Students in this course expand on these goals to develop a solid foundation for understanding the need for effective health policy and management and the role of the public health professional charged with influencing local, state, and federal policy. Students identify and assess components of organization, financing, and delivery of health services and systems in the United States. They engage in a variety of contextual and practical assignments focused on management theories, policy processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. Students also consider the impact of global trends on public health practice, policy, and systems.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8200 – Organizing Community Action for Health Promotion and Education♦

    (5 cr.) There are many task forces, coalitions, and consortiums in place to promote health and prevent disease. But groups such as these require individuals who know how to effectively organize and lead community-based efforts. Students in this course explore the skills and methods leaders use to organize communities, interagency collaborative efforts, and work sites for collective action regarding health promotion and education. Students analyze risk factors at the community, work-site, local, state, national, and international levels. Using qualitative and quantitative methods, students assess the needs and capacities of communities for health-related initiatives. They also synthesize course content to evaluate an existing collaborative community organization strategy and propose new methods and processes for team building in community health programs. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • PUBH 8210 – Public Campaigns for Health Promotion and Education♦

    (5 cr.) Healthcare professionals often use communications media and marketing strategies to promote health, reduce risk factors, and influence community leadership to support healthful conditions. In this course, students explore the persuasive use of these strategies in health promotion and education. They examine a variety of topics, including the design of mass media campaigns; target markets; and working with and responding to media, including broadcast, print, the Internet, and other electronic communication media. Applying course concepts as well as analysis and creative skills, students develop and present a media campaign designed to deliver a specific message about a health problem to a select population. Through this project, students gain practical experience critiquing literature, framing health messages, using media to promote a program or message, conducing formative research, applying theories and models, and developing plans. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8215 – Public Health Policy Design and Implementation♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the application of scientific data in the formulation of policy recommendations as well as the process and function of drafting legislation and ordinances to promote equitable distribution of health resources, healthy living conditions, and other activities to reduce health risk. Students identify and describe various existing initiatives that promote public health policy formulation. They also learn leadership strategies for effective lobbying of decision makers and community leaders. Through an integrative project, students engage in a critical review of a selected program through which they critique professional journal articles, develop their analysis, and engage in review of peer work. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8220 – Health Promotion and Education Interventions in Diverse Populations♦

    (5 cr.) Through this course, students explore the planning and organization of health promotion programs for underserved, economically disadvantaged, and underrepresented populations. Students learn to design health promotion programs that consider the social, economic, and medical conditions influencing the health status of diverse populations. Throughout the course, students develop a health promotion project for a specific population, based on the intervention mapping process. Through this project, students analyze and integrate principles of social change and empowerment, summarize research that supports the decision-making process, and critique institutional and social systems. Students also have the opportunity to assess and discuss the future of health promotion, considering projections of needs over the next two decades. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8225 – Design and Analysis of Community Trials♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students investigate randomized, controlled trials of health promotion and education programs as well as disease-prevention interventions, using communities as the units of analysis. Students engage in an in-depth exploration of techniques for randomization, multicenter coordination, data management, team building, statistical analysis, models for community assessment, publication, and ethics. Through case studies, students assess the univariate, bivariate, and multivariate statistical techniques used in the studies to analyze data. Students also gain practical experience developing a grant proposal for a research project focused on contemporary public health education/promotion. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8235 – Program Design, Planning, and Evaluation♦

    (4 cr.) The focus of this course is on the competencies required of the public health professional in planning for the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of community health promotion and disease prevention initiatives. Attention is given to needs assessment and the social, behavioral, environmental, biological, and economic factors that contribute to health outcomes. Strategic approaches to planning, implementation, and evaluation including cost-benefit analysis are addressed. Health behavior theories are considered in the development of educational programs, the application of evaluation findings, and prioritization of community concerns and resources.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8240 – Public Health Policy and Advocacy♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the role of federal, state, and local government in the assurance of public health through health policy and law. Consideration is given to contemporary policy, law and regulatory issues arising in public health practice, as well as to the economics and financing of public health programs. The advocacy, political, and creative process in the formulation, implementation and modification of health policy are examined and discussed.  Students also learn how to structure and write a health policy analysis.

    Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8245 – Applied Research in Public Health♦

    (5 cr.) The goal of this course is to provide participants with an understanding of theories, principles, strategies and alternative methods of applied research (quantitative, qualitative, and/or mixed-method designs) in public health focusing on culturally sensitive, appropriate literacy level and appropriate community engagement through participatory action research and collaborative inquiry of community-based participatory research, an appreciation of advantages and limitations of this approach, and skills necessary for participating effectively in CBPR projects.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8246 – Advanced Application of Practice-Based Research in Public Health♦

    (5 cr.) The goal of this course is to provide participants with an understanding of theories, principles, strategies and alternative methods of applied research (quantitative, qualitative, and/or mixed-method designs) in public health focusing on culturally sensitive, appropriate literacy level and appropriate community engagement through participatory action research and collaborative inquiry of community-based participatory research, an appreciation of advantages and limitations of this approach, and skills necessary for participating effectively in CBPR projects. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8270 – Health Informatics and Surveillance♦

    (5 cr.) By addressing current trends and future applications in public health research, students develop advanced competency in health informatics and surveillance in this course. The key issues of data standards and integration, vocabularies and data transmission protocols, health information technology, surveillance systems, and the application of geographical information systems to situation awareness are addressed. Other topics include information architecture, public health records, electronic medical records, electronic health records, health information exchange, and database design, as well as information storage, security, and privacy.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8300 – Infectious Disease Epidemiology♦

    (5 cr.) A practical understanding of the epidemiological characteristics of major infectious diseases in humans helps healthcare professionals develop strategies to prevent epidemics or transmission of the major infections affecting society today. In this course, students examine the epidemiology of infectious and acute diseases, including the impact of infectious diseases on populations, taxonomy and structure of disease agents, modes of transmission, infectivity, pathogenicity, virulence, incubation, and surveillance methods. They explore a variety of related topics, including diarrheal diseases, viral hepatitis, sexually transmitted diseases, HIV/AIDS, and airborne and vector-borne organisms. Through this course, students gain an understanding of the main epidemiological diseases in humans.(Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8310 – Social and Behavioral Epidemiology♦

    (5 cr.) Health professionals concerned with the prevention of communicable disease and the promotion of public health often focus their effort on studies and initiatives that benefit as many individuals as possible, which requires an understanding of the relationship between social and behavior issues of individuals and communities. In this course, students explore various works in social, behavioral, and psychiatric epidemiology, including those on the occurrence and distribution of illness. Students engage in various conceptual and practical assignments on the application of basic epidemiologic research designs; the study of social, behavioral, and psychiatric conditions in all age groups; and the relationship between sociocultural factors and individual or community behavioral issues. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8315 – Economics and Financing of Public Health Systems♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students investigate the provision of resources for the delivery of public health services and the application of economic theories to health policy issues. Students explore how organizational characteristics interact with economic forces to produce systems performance outcomes, as well as how fiscal policy can influence the performance of public health systems. Students analyze grant-writing strategies and the advantages and disadvantages of various financing options. Other topics include methods of economic evaluation and their usefulness in determining appropriate financing mechanisms for public health systems.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • PUBH 8320 – Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of the methods used in evaluating the health effects of physical, biological, and chemical agents in the environment and evidence-based information of such exposures. Students engage in policy questions raised by scientific evidence and they review and critically analyze current literature on specific environmental and occupational health issues of current interest. They devote special attention to study design, exposure assessment, outcome definition, and sources of bias. Through this course, students learn the focal responsibilities of occupational and environmental epidemiologists as well as their goals, which are to reduce health risks caused by environmental and occupational hazards and to provide guidance to those exposed to contaminants. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8330 – Chronic Disease Epidemiology♦

    (5 cr.) There are many approaches to advancing public health, one of which is examining and managing chronic disease factors from a research-based approach for effective prevention and intervention.  In this course, students investigate the major chronic diseases: cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurological diseases, and diabetes. Students also focus on major risk factors that impact chronic disease. They explore the methods and functions of monitoring chronic diseases and evaluating prevention interventions. Demonstrating understanding of public health principles and other course concepts, students develop a community-based, chronic disease intervention evaluation plan to address a topic relevant to a specific population. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8340 – Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology♦

    (5 cr.) Professionals working in the field of molecular and genetic epidemiology investigate how genetic and molecular factors lend to susceptibility of disease, using the information to inform public health prevention and treatment initiatives. Students are acquainted with the fundamentals of molecular and genetic epidemiology. Assessing topical, scholarly literature in the field, students explore molecular markers of environmental exposures, applications to risk assessment, genetic markers of susceptibility, the Human Genome Project, genetic testing, gene-environment interaction, and pharmacogenomics. Sharpening scholarly-writing and research skills, students also engage in a critical analysis of a specific disease or health outcome from a molecular perspective for which they provide their findings and summary in a final, APA-formatted paper. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8350 – Field Methods and Data Analysis in Epidemiology

    (5 cr.) Integrating theory and practice, students in this course have the opportunity to conduct epidemiological field studies, gaining a better understanding and appreciation of survey methodology. Students learn techniques and acquire resources needed to design and carry out the field portion of an epidemiological investigation, including staff recruitment and training; counting and listing techniques; enumeration methodologies; subject recruitment, retention, and tracking; data storage and management; and general survey instrument issues. Applying course concepts, students engage in practical discussions and hands-on lab assignments, which emphasize weekly content.(Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)

  • PUBH 8400 – Public Health Leadership and Systems Thinking♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore leadership models and theories, the core principles of public health leadership, and the application of systems thinking to public health. They examine how to create strategies and solutions that efficiently utilize public health and healthcare resources. Students also discuss descriptive and prescriptive systems, focusing on the application of these processes to current public health issues and challenges at the organizational and community levels.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8440 – Application of Public Health and Behavior Change Theories♦

    (5 cr.) This course presents a comprehensive look at public health and behavior change theories that apply to community health education. Students review and assess predominant social and behavioral principles at the individual, interpersonal, and community levels. Students discuss examples of how others have harnessed social marketing and communication technology to effect positive health behavior change in individuals and communities. Students learn to apply theories to public health research and practice.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8450 – Community Health Assessment♦

    (5 cr.) This course covers community health assessment and its application to program planning. Students learn to identify and prioritize problems, then assess and utilize community resources to address these problems. Topics include measuring selected determinants of community health status and health services use, classifying community assets, identifying data sources, and applying certain methods to maximize community participation. Students synthesize the results of a community health assessment to create a community diagnosis that serves as the basis for program planning and research design.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8475 – Advanced Program Implementation and Evaluation♦

    (5 cr.) This course promotes competency in program design, implementation, and evaluation. It provides an overview of public health program planning and development, as well as needs and assets assessment. It focuses on the methods required to implement programs and evaluate their efficacy. Students discuss the administration and coordination of public health program interventions and activities, and explore the variety of methods used to facilitate public health research.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8500 – Advanced Biostatistics♦

    (5 cr.) This course covers the advanced biostatistics methods that students need to prepare for conducting future research, as well as for critically reviewing the statistical methods incorporated in public health literature. Students learn to use statistical methodologies such as covariance and repeated measures, longitudinal data analysis, life tables and survival analysis, multiple regression, logistic regression, Poisson regression, and the Cox proportional hazards regression model. In this course, students use SPSS statistical software for advanced data management, manipulation, analysis, and the use of graphical techniques.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8520 – Advanced Epidemiology Methods♦

    (5 cr.) This course integrates the principles of epidemiologic design, analysis, and interpretation at an advanced level. Students discuss data sources, assessment of dependent and independent variables, measurement error, confounding, and bias. Students explore methodological issues in epidemiology, including factors critical to public health research, such as missing data, intermediate variables, confounding, complex study designs, meta-analysis, and questionnaire design. The course covers concepts and applications in survival analysis, analysis of incidence rates, life tables, and parametric and nonparametric approaches.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8540 – Epidemiology Topics Seminar♦

    (5 cr.) Students in this seminar are exposed to current research and special topics of interest in epidemiology. Students choose from a wide range of discussion topics, including infectious disease, non-endemic communicable disease, chronic disease, global health, maternal and child health, social and behavioral concerns, environmental issues, genetic factors, and other emerging topics of interest. Students perform a critical review of the research literature, providing them further insight into topics of epidemiology.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8545 – Advanced Analysis of Community Health Data and Surveillance in Public Health♦

    (5 cr.) In this course, students cover the application of community health assessment, secondary data analysis, and the use of health informatics and surveillance for program planning. Students learn to identify and prioritize problems, then assess and utilize community resources to address these problems. Topics include measuring selected determinants of community health status and health services use, classifying community assets, identifying data sources, simple and complex sampling designs and applying certain methods to maximize community participation incorporating the use of quantitative, qualitative and mixed-methods research designs. Students will develop an understanding of statistical and epidemiological methodology to utilize secondary data to synthesize the results of a community health assessment and limitations to create a community diagnosis that serves as the basis for program planning and research design.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8550 – Writing a Quality Prospectus♦

    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is on the process of writing the doctoral dissertation premise and prospectus. The premise will guide students through their committee selection process. The prospectus will guide students through the stages of writing a dissertation—conducting a literature review, developing a problem statement and research questions, and evaluating research designs, methods, and types of analysis. The premise and prospectus that students write for this course will be for a possible dissertation topic. This exercise is the cornerstone of this course and will prepare students for working with their chosen dissertation topic.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  • PUBH 8560 – Advanced Analysis of Secondary Data

    (5 cr.) Through this course, students develop an advanced understanding of statistical methodology and the use of biomedical and secondary data sources. Topics include how researchers work with groups and institutions that provide or create publicly available data sets. Students explore how to design research to make appropriate use of secondary data sources. The course also addresses simple and complex sampling designs and sample weighting, as well as the strengths and limitations of using secondary data.

  • PUBH 8900 – Research Forum

    0 The purpose of this forum is to assist students with making steady progress toward earning a Doctor of Public Health (DrPH) degree. The course offers doctoral students the opportunity to integrate their program of study and demonstrate knowledge of an in-depth exploration of a public health practice, issue, or problem. Students will engage in regular scholarly discussions with a faculty chair and fellow doctoral students, submit Quarterly Plans, and products toward completion of the DrPH degree.  Information and resources related to the doctoral study, residencies, research and writing, and doctoral program expectations are provided for guidance. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • PUBH 9000 – Public Health Dissertation

    (30 cr. minimum—6 credits per term for minimum 5 terms) Doctoral students are offered the opportunity to integrate their program of study into an in-depth exploration within an interest area through the completion of a research study in this course. Students complete the dissertation independently, with the guidance of a dissertation supervisory committee chair and committee members. They must also participate in an accompanying online course and complete a prospectus, proposal, Institutional Review Board application, and final dissertation paper and presentation. Once students register for PUBH 9000, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula; appointment of an approved dissertation committee chair.)

  • PUBH 9001 – Dissertation

    (20 cr. minimum—5 cr. per term for minimum 4 terms) This course offers doctoral students the opportunity to integrate their program of study into an in-depth exploration of an interest area that includes the completion of a research study. Students complete the dissertation independently, with the guidance of a dissertation supervisory committee chair and committee members, in a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students complete a prospectus, proposal, Institutional Review Board application, and dissertation.

  • PUBH 9100 – Public Health Capstone

    (5 cr.) In this capstone course, doctoral students have the opportunity to integrate their program of study and demonstrate their knowledge into an in-depth exploration of a public health practice issue or problem. Students complete an applied practice-based project independently, with the guidance of a capstone supervisory committee chair and committee members, in a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students complete a prospectus, proposal, Institutional Review Board application, and carry out and analyze a research protocol and project. (Prerequisite(s): All other courses in the Doctor of Public Health program Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams

•  NURS 3000 – Issues and Trends in Nursing♦
•  NURS 3001 – Issues and Trends in Nursing
•  NURS 3005 – The Context of Healthcare Delivery♦
•  NURS 3010 – Information Management in Nursing and Healthcare♦
•  NURS 3015 – Pathopharmacology♦
•  NURS 3020 – Health Assessment♦
•  NURS 4000 – Research and Scholarship for Evidence-Based Practice♦
•  NURS 4001 – Research and Scholarship for Evidence-Based Practice
•  NURS 4005 – Topics in Clinical Nursing♦
•  NURS 4006 – Topics in Clinical Nursing
•  NURS 4010 – Family, Community, and Population-Based Care
•  NURS 4011 – Family, Community, and Population-Based Care
•  NURS 4015 – Public and Global Health♦
•  NURS 4020 – Leadership Competencies in Nursing and Healthcare
•  NURS 4021 – Leadership Competencies in Nursing and Healthcare
•  NURS 5050 – Policy and Advocacy for Improving Population Health
•  NURS 5051 – Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Through Technology
•  NURS 5052 – Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice
•  NURS 5501 – Introduction to Statistics and Applied Research Methods
•  NURS 6000 – Success Strategies in the Master of Science Program in Nursing Online Environment
•  NURS 6001 – Foundations for Graduate Study
•  NURS 6006 – Issues and Trends in Nursing
•  NURS 6010 – Advancing Nursing Through Inquiry and Research
•  NURS 6015 – Information and Healthcare Technologies Applied to Nursing Practice
•  NURS 6022 – Topics in Clinical Nursing
•  NURS 6025 – Managing a Continuum of Care for Positive Patient Outcomes
•  NURS 6030 – The Practice of Population-Based Care
•  NURS 6050 – Policy and Advocacy for Improving Population Health
•  NURS 6051 – Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Through Technology
•  NURS 6052 – Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice
•  NURS 6053 – Interprofessional Organizational and Systems Leadership
•  NURS 6101 – Policy and Politics in Nursing and Healthcare
•  NURS 6110 – The Nurse Leader: New Perspectives on the Profession
•  NURS 6125 – Integrating Theory and Research for Evidence-Based Practice
•  NURS 6150 – Promoting and Preserving Health in a Diverse Society
•  NURS 6200 – The Nurse Administrator: Leading and Managing for Excellence
•  NURS 6201 – Leadership in Nursing and Healthcare
•  NURS 6210 – Healthcare Finance and Budgeting
•  NURS 6211 – Finance and Economics in Healthcare Delivery
•  NURS 6220 – Human Resource Management
•  NURS 6221 – Managing Human Resources
•  NURS 6230 – Case Study: Quality Nursing in a Complex Healthcare Organization
•  NURS 6231 – Healthcare Systems and Quality Outcomes
•  NURS 6241 – Strategic Planning in Healthcare Organizations
•  NURS 6300 – Student-Centered Learning in Nursing Education
•  NURS 6301 – Advanced Pathopharmacology
•  NURS 6310 – Teaching Strategies for Nurse Educators
•  NURS 6320 – Integrating Technology Into Nursing Education
•  NURS 6321 – Curriculum Development, Assessment, and Evaluation
•  NURS 6330 – Curriculum Development, Assessment, and Evaluation
•  NURS 6331 – Teaching Learning Strategies: Integrating Technology Into Nursing Education
•  NURS 6340 – The Nurse Educator: Roles, Responsibilities, and Relationships
•  NURS 6341 – Specialty in Clinical Nursing
•  NURS 6351 – Role of the Nurse Educator
•  NURS 6400 – Informatics in Nursing and Healthcare
•  NURS 6401 – Informatics in Nursing and Healthcare
•  NURS 6410 – Information and Knowledge Management
•  NURS 6411 – Information and Knowledge Management
•  NURS 6420 – Supporting Workflow in Healthcare Systems
•  NURS 6421 – Supporting Workflow in Healthcare Systems
•  NURS 6430 – Project Management: Healthcare Information Technology
•  NURS 6431 – System Design, Planning, and Evaluation
•  NURS 6441 – Project Management: Healthcare Information Technology
•  NURS 6500 – Capstone Synthesis: Practicum I
•  NURS 6501 – Advanced Pathophysiology
•  NURS 6510 – Capstone Synthesis: Practicum II
•  NURS 6511 – Advanced Health Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning
•  NURS 6521 – Advanced Pharmacology
•  NURS 6531 – Advanced Practice Care of Adults Across the Lifespan
•  NURS 6540 – Advanced Practice Care of Frail Elders
•  NURS 6541 – Primary Care of Adolescents and Children
•  NURS 6550 – Advanced Practice Care of Adults in Acute Care Settings I
•  NURS 6551 – Primary Care of Women
•  NURS 6560 – Advanced Practice Care of Adults in Acute Care Settings II
•  NURS 6561 – Direct Care Roles in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Across the Lifespan
•  NURS 6600 – Capstone Synthesis Practicum
•  NURS 8000 – Foundations and Essentials of Doctoral Study in Nursing
•  NURS 8100 – Healthcare Policy and Advocacy
•  NURS 8110 – Theoretical and Scientific Foundations for Nursing
•  NURS 8200 – Methods for Evidence-Based Practice
•  NURS 8210 – Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Through Technology
•  NURS 8250 – Advanced Theoretical and Scientific Perspectives in Nursing
•  NURS 8300 – Organizational and Systems Leadership for Quality Improvement
•  NURS 8310 – Epidemiology and Population Health
•  NURS 8400 – Evidence-Based Practice I: Assessment and Design
•  NURS 8410 – Best Practices In Nursing Specialties
•  NURS 8500 – Evidence-Based Practice II: Planning and Implementation
•  NURS 8510 – Evidence-Based Practice III: Implementation, Evaluation, and Dissemination
•  NURS 8551 – Preparing for Dissertation
•  NURS 8600 – DNP Field Experience
•  NURS 8700 – DNP Project Mentoring
•  NURS 8701 – DNP Project Completion
•  NURS 9000 – Dissertation
•  HINF 6100 – Introduction to Health Informatics
•  HINF 6115 – U.S. Health System♦
•  HINF 6130 – Information Systems Management
•  HINF 6145 – Nature, Structure, and Representation of Health Information
•  HINF 6160 – Legal, Regulatory, and Ethical Issues♦
•  HINF 6175 – Quality Assessment and Improvement♦
•  HINF 6190 – Project Management♦
•  HINF 6205 – Research Methods and Quantitative Analysis♦
•  HINF 6220 – Leadership, Organizational Behavior, and Change Management♦
•  HINF 6235 – Healthcare Information Technology Business and Finance♦
•  HINF 6950 – Practicum
•  HINF 6960 – Scholarly Project
•  HIST 2005 – World History 1900–1945♦
•  HIST 2006 – World History 1945–2000♦
•  HLTH 1000 – Concepts of Health Promotion♦
•  HLTH 1005 – Context of Healthcare Delivery♦
•  HLTH 2110 – Behavioral and Cultural Issues in Healthcare♦
•  HLTH 2115 – Aging Across the Lifespan♦
•  HLTH 2120 – Health Informatics♦
•  HLTH 3100 – Ethical and Legal Issues in Healthcare♦
•  HLTH 3105 – Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Healthcare♦
•  HLTH 3110 – Current Issues in Healthcare Policy and Practice♦
•  HLTH 3115 – Public and Global Health♦
•  HLTH 4000 – Introduction to Healthcare Management♦
•  HLTH 4050 – Introduction to Disaster and Emergency Management♦
•  HLTH 4100 – Healthcare Organization Theory and Behavior♦
•  HLTH 4105 – Healthcare Finance and Economics♦
•  HLTH 4110 – Healthcare Quality and Safety♦
•  HLTH 4115 – Strategic Planning and Marketing in Healthcare♦
•  HLTH 4120 – Managing the Healthcare Workforce♦
•  HLTH 4200 – Principles of Epidemiology
•  HLTH 4205 – Introduction to Research Methods and Analysis
•  HLTH 4300 – Personal Health and Wellness♦
•  HLTH 4320 – Nutrition Across the Lifespan♦
•  HLTH 4340 – Fit and Well: Core Concepts in Exercise Science♦
•  HLTH 4360 – Stress Management and Wellness♦
•  HLTH 4380 – Strategies for Health Communication and Wellness♦
•  HLTH 4900 – Capstone
•  HLTH 6005 – Perspectives on Health and the Developing Professional
•  HLTH 6030 – Socioecological Perspectives on Health♦
•  HLTH 6031 – Public Health Administration and Leadership♦
•  HLTH 6051 – Diversity, Human Rights, and Social Justice
•  HLTH 6100 – Critical Issues in Emergency Management♦
•  HLTH 6110 – Exploring Health Education in the 21st Century♦
•  HLTH 6111 – Leadership and Organizational Change♦
•  HLTH 6112 – Governance and Public Policy♦
•  HLTH 6200 – Risk Assessment, Preparedness and Disaster Mitigation♦
•  HLTH 6205 – Assessing Community Needs for Health Education♦
•  HLTH 6207 – Grant Writing♦
•  HLTH 6245 – Applied Research in Public Health♦
•  HLTH 6280 – Policy and Politics in American Political Institutions♦
•  HLTH 6300 – Disaster Response and Recovery♦
•  HLTH 6405 – Ethics and Social Justice♦
•  HLTH 6412 – Health Education and Communication Strategies♦
•  HLTH 6475 – Program Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation♦
•  HLTH 6740 – Disaster, Crisis, and Trauma♦
•  HLTH 6771 – Terrorism: A Systematic Approach for Emergency Preparedness♦
•  HLTH 6800 – Health Education and Promotion Capstone
•  HLTH 6840 – Health Policy and Management♦
•  HLTH 8001 – Foundations of Graduate Study
•  HLTH 8003 – Building a Multidisciplinary Approach to Health
•  HLTH 8008 – Foundations for Doctoral Study
•  HLTH 8015 – Administration and Leadership of Public Health Programs
•  HLTH 8031 – Public Health Administration and Leadership
•  HLTH 8050 – Global Health and Issues in Disease Prevention♦
•  HLTH 8111 – Leadership and Organizational Change
•  HLTH 8112 – Governance and Public Policy
•  HLTH 8120 – Current Research in Social Change
•  HLTH 8123 – Current Research in Social Change: Health Management and Policy
•  HLTH 8125 – Current Research in Social Change: Health Promotion and Education
•  HLTH 8127 – Public Health Policy, Politics and Progress♦
•  HLTH 8129 – Communications, Marketing, and Public Relations for Public Health Leaders♦
•  HLTH 8130 – Professional Practice and Social Change
•  HLTH 8133 – Professional Practice and Social Change: Health Management and Policy
•  HLTH 8135 – Professional Practice and Social Change: Health Promotion and Education
•  HLTH 8136 – Leadership, Professionalism, and Ethics in Public Health Practice
•  HLTH 8175 – Health Policy and Management
•  HLTH 8200 – Organizing Community Action for Health Promotion and Education
•  HLTH 8210 – Public Campaigns for Health Promotion and Education
•  HLTH 8215 – Public Health Policy Design and Implementation
•  HLTH 8219 – Health Promotion and Educational Interventions in Diverse Populations
•  HLTH 8220 – Current Research in Human Development
•  HLTH 8223 – Current Research in Human Development: Health Management and Policy
•  HLTH 8225 – Current Research in Human Development: Health Promotion and Education
•  HLTH 8230 – Professional Practice and Human Development
•  HLTH 8233 – Professional Practice and Human Development: Health Management and Policy
•  HLTH 8235 – Professional Practice and Human Development: Health Promotion and Education
•  HLTH 8320 – Current Research in Organizational and Social Systems
•  HLTH 8323 – Current Research in Organizational and Social Systems: Health Management and Policy
•  HLTH 8325 – Current Research in Organizational and Social Systems: Health Promotion and Education
•  HLTH 8330 – Professional Practice and Organizational and Social Systems
•  HLTH 8333 – Professional Practice and Organizational and Social Systems: Health Management and Policy
•  HLTH 8335 – Professional Practice and Organizational and Social Systems: Health Promotion and Education
•  HLTH 8381 – Public Policy and Evaluation
•  HLTH 8382 – Public Policy and Finance
•  HLTH 8392 – The Language of Leadership
•  HLTH 8400 – Public Health Leadership and Systems Thinking♦
•  HLTH 8410 – U.S. Healthcare Delivery System
•  HLTH 8415 – Organizational Development and Leadership
•  HLTH 8420 – Health Economics
•  HLTH 8425 – Health Policy
•  HLTH 8430 – Healthcare Financial Management
•  HLTH 8431 – Finance and Budgeting for the Public Sector♦
•  HLTH 8435 – Health Law and Ethics
•  HLTH 8440 – Application of Public Health and Behavior Change Theories♦
•  HLTH 8450 – Community Health Assessment♦
•  HLTH 8451 – Public Policy Analysis♦
•  HLTH 8460 – Health Education and Community Advocacy
•  HLTH 8465 – Strategic Planning: Collaboration, Cooperation, and Coordination
•  HLTH 8475 – Advanced Program Planning Implementation and Evaluation♦
•  HLTH 8510 – Health Services in the Contemporary Context
•  HLTH 8513 – Health Services in the Contemporary Context: Health Management and Policy
•  HLTH 8520 – Current Concepts and Methods in Health Services
•  HLTH 8523 – Current Concepts and Methods in Health Services: Health Management and Policy
•  HLTH 8530 – Integrative Professional Practice in Health Services
•  HLTH 8533 – Integrative Professional Practice in Health Services: Health Management and Policy
•  HLTH 8550 – Writing a Quality Prospectus
•  HLTH 8610 – Health Services Delivery and Ethical Implications
•  HLTH 8613 – Health Services Delivery and Ethical Implications: Health Management and Policy
•  HLTH 8620 – Health Services Delivery and Ethical Decision-Making
•  HLTH 8623 – Health Services Delivery and Ethical Decision-Making: Health Management and Policy
•  HLTH 8630 – Ethical Theories Applied in Health Services
•  HLTH 8633 – Ethical Theories Applied in Health Services: Health Management and Policy
•  HLTH 8710 – Theories of Case Study Research and Applied Change in Health Services
•  HLTH 8713 – Theories of Case Study Research and Applied Change in Health Services: Health Management and Policy
•  HLTH 8720 – Relating Change Theories to Practice in Health Services
•  HLTH 8723 – Relating Change Theories to Practice in Health Services: Health Management and Policy
•  HLTH 8730 – A Case Study of Applied Change in Health Services
•  HLTH 8733 – A Case Study of Applied Change in Health Services: Health Management and Policy
•  HLTH 9000 – Dissertation
•  HLTH 9001 – Health Services Dissertation
•  MMBA 6920 – Health Services Financial Management
•  MMHA 5015 – Foundations of Healthcare Administration
•  MMHA 5100 – U.S. Healthcare Delivery System

 

•  MMHA 5135 – Health Policy and Economics
•  MMHA 5205 – Health Law and Ethics
•  MMHA 6015 – Foundations of Healthcare Administration
•  MMHA 6100 – U.S. Healthcare Delivery System♦
•  MMHA 6115 – Research Methods and Quantitative Analysis♦
•  MMHA 6130 – Health Economics♦
•  MMHA 6135 – Health Policy and Economics♦
•  MMHA 6145 – Health Policy♦
•  MMHA 6160 – Financial Management
•  MMHA 6175 – Management Aspects of Clinical Service Delivery♦
•  MMHA 6190 – Organizational Development and Leadership♦
•  MMHA 6205 – Health Law and Ethics♦
•  MMHA 6220 – Human Resource Management♦
•  MMHA 6235 – Operations Analysis♦
•  MMHA 6250 – Quality Assessment and Improvement♦
•  MMHA 6265 – Health Informatics and Technology♦
•  MMHA 6280 – Strategic Planning and Implementation
•  MMHA 6550 – Practicum
•  MMHA 6560 – Capstone
•  PUBH 1000 – Foundations of Public Health♦
•  PUBH 3000 – Environmental Health♦
•  PUBH 3100 – Human Disease and Prevention♦
•  PUBH 4000 – Public Health Education and Communication♦
•  PUBH 4030 – Planning Public Health Programs♦
•  PUBH 4100 – Evaluating Public Health Programs♦
•  PUBH 4200 – Public Health Policy for Social Change♦
•  PUBH 4900 – Capstone in Public Health
•  PUBH 5002 – Essentials of Public Health: A Case Study Approach
•  PUBH 5003 – Data Analysis and Presentation
•  PUBH 5101 – Principles of Communication in Public Health
•  PUBH 5115 – Social, Behavioral, and Cultural Factors in Public Health
Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams •  PUBH 5125 – Biostatistics
•  PUBH 5145 – Epidemiology
•  PUBH 5165 – Environmental Health
•  PUBH 5175 – Health Policy and Management
•  PUBH 5235 – Program Design, Planning, and Evaluation
•  PUBH 6002 – Essentials of Public Health: A Case Study Approach♦
•  PUBH 6005 – Perspectives on Health and the Developing Scholar-Practitioner
•  PUBH 6030 – Socioecological Perspectives on Health♦
•  PUBH 6031 – Public Health Administration and Leadership♦
•  PUBH 6032 – SPSS Revealed
•  PUBH 6033 – Interpretation and Application of Public Health Data♦
•  PUBH 6034 – Environmental Health: Local to Global♦
•  PUBH 6035 – Epidemiology: Decoding the Science of Public Health♦
•  PUBH 6101 – Principles of Communication in Public Health
•  PUBH 6115 – Social, Behavioral, and Cultural Factors in Public Health♦
•  PUBH 6125 – Biostatistics♦
•  PUBH 6127 – Public Health Policy, Politics and Progress♦
•  PUBH 6127 – Public Health Policy, Politics and Progress♦
•  PUBH 6128 – Biological Foundations of Public Health♦
•  PUBH 6129 – Global Perspectives on Health♦
•  PUBH 6135 – Leadership, Professionalism, and Ethics in Public Health Practice♦
•  PUBH 6145 – Epidemiology♦
•  PUBH 6155 – Research in Public Health♦
•  PUBH 6165 – Environmental Health♦
•  PUBH 6170 – Public Health Biology♦
•  PUBH 6175 – Health Policy and Management♦
•  PUBH 6227 – Health Informatics♦
•  PUBH 6235 – Program Design, Planning, and Evaluation♦
•  PUBH 6245 – Applied Research in Public Health♦
•  PUBH 6260 – Legal and Regulatory Aspects of Public Health♦
•  PUBH 6475 – Program Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation♦
•  PUBH 6635 – Practicum I: Field Experience in Public Health
•  PUBH 6636 – Practicum II: Capstone Experience in Public Health
•  PUBH 6638 – Practicum I: Field Experience in Public Health
•  PUBH 6639 – Practicum II: Field Experience and Applied Project in Public Health
•  PUBH 6640 – Seminar: Applied Project in Public Health
•  PUBH 8002 – Essentials of Public Health: A Case Study Approach♦
•  PUBH 8003 – Building a Multidisciplinary Approach to Health♦
•  PUBH 8005 – Foundations for Graduate Study♦
•  PUBH 8010 – Promoting Population Health♦
•  PUBH 8015 – Administration and Leadership of Public Health Programs♦
•  PUBH 8020 – Public Health Informatics♦
•  PUBH 8030 – Socioecological Perspectives on Health♦
•  PUBH 8031 – Public Health Administration and Leadership♦
•  PUBH 8032 – SPSS Revealed
•  PUBH 8033 – Interpretation and Application of Public Health Data♦
•  PUBH 8034 – Environmental Health: Local to Global♦
•  PUBH 8035 – Epidemiology: Decoding the Science of Public Health♦
•  PUBH 8050 – Global Health and Issues in Disease Prevention♦
•  PUBH 8101 – Principles of Communication in Public Health
•  PUBH 8115 – Social, Behavioral, and Cultural Factors in Public Health♦
•  PUBH 8125 – Biostatistics♦
•  PUBH 8130 – Communications, Marketing, and Public Relations for Public Health Leaders♦
•  PUBH 8135 – Leadership, Professionalism, and Ethics in Public Health Practice♦
•  PUBH 8145 – Epidemiology♦
•  PUBH 8155 – Research in Public Health♦
•  PUBH 8165 – Environmental Health♦
•  PUBH 8175 – Health Policy and Management♦
•  PUBH 8200 – Organizing Community Action for Health Promotion and Education♦
•  PUBH 8210 – Public Campaigns for Health Promotion and Education♦
•  PUBH 8215 – Public Health Policy Design and Implementation♦
•  PUBH 8220 – Health Promotion and Education Interventions in Diverse Populations♦
•  PUBH 8225 – Design and Analysis of Community Trials♦
•  PUBH 8235 – Program Design, Planning, and Evaluation♦
•  PUBH 8240 – Public Health Policy and Advocacy♦
•  PUBH 8245 – Applied Research in Public Health♦
•  PUBH 8246 – Advanced Application of Practice-Based Research in Public Health♦
•  PUBH 8270 – Health Informatics and Surveillance♦
•  PUBH 8300 – Infectious Disease Epidemiology♦
•  PUBH 8310 – Social and Behavioral Epidemiology♦
•  PUBH 8315 – Economics and Financing of Public Health Systems♦
•  PUBH 8320 – Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology♦
•  PUBH 8330 – Chronic Disease Epidemiology♦
•  PUBH 8340 – Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology♦
•  PUBH 8350 – Field Methods and Data Analysis in Epidemiology
•  PUBH 8400 – Public Health Leadership and Systems Thinking♦
•  PUBH 8440 – Application of Public Health and Behavior Change Theories♦
•  PUBH 8450 – Community Health Assessment♦
•  PUBH 8475 – Advanced Program Implementation and Evaluation♦
•  PUBH 8500 – Advanced Biostatistics♦ Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams
•  PUBH 8520 – Advanced Epidemiology Methods♦
•  PUBH 8540 – Epidemiology Topics Seminar♦
•  PUBH 8545 – Advanced Analysis of Community Health Data and Surveillance in Public Health♦
•  PUBH 8550 – Writing a Quality Prospectus♦
•  PUBH 8560 – Advanced Analysis of Secondary Data
•  PUBH 8900 – Research Forum
•  PUBH 9000 – Public Health Dissertation
•  PUBH 9001 – Dissertation
•  PUBH 9100 – Public Health Capstone
  • NURS 6561 – Direct Care Roles in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Across the Lifespan

    (5 cr.) Taking a broader view of the comprehensive perspectives of health in a community is imperative for an advanced practice nurse. Students in this course focus on health-related behaviors that impact the health and wellness of individuals across their lifespan. Students examine how nutrition, exercise, smoking, and a sedentary lifestyle relate to common diseases. Through case studies and a group project, students complete risk assessments, diagnose health problems directly related to risky lifestyles, and implement and evaluate various behavioral and therapeutic measures to reduce the negative behavior and improve lifestyles. (Prerequisite(s): NURS 6501, NURS 6511, NURS 6521, NURS 6531, and either NURS 6540 or NURS 6541, and NURS 6551). Note: This course requires a minimum of 144 practicum hours.

  • NURS 6600 – Capstone Synthesis Practicum

    (5 cr.) Students in this course apply the MSN curriculum experience by translating knowledge into practice by designing, developing, and implementing a project in a professional healthcare setting. By using the culmination of learning, students gain the opportunity effect positive social change within the healthcare delivery environment in the roles of change agent and nurse. The result of the practicum experience provides students with an experience through which they develop their passion as a practitioner while enhancing the nurse role as an advocate for social change within the context of a scholarly presence. Note: This course requires a minimum of 144 practicum hours. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

  • NURS 8000 – Foundations and Essentials of Doctoral Study in Nursing

    (1 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and are provided with a foundation for professional development in doctoral nursing practice. Students learn professional standards and end-of-program expectations. They engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students also explore the essentials of being a Walden doctoral student; past, present, and future similarities and differences between the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and a Ph.D. in nursing, relevant professional and specialty standards of doctoral-level nursing practice, intra- and interprofessional collaboration, and the process of the DNP project.

  • NURS 8100 – Healthcare Policy and Advocacy

    (5 cr.) Many economic, financial, and political factors influence the delivery of healthcare, making healthcare reform a challenging  task. In this course, students examine these factors, challenges, and consider policy reform through legal, regulatory, ethical, societal, and organizational contexts. They examine the political and policy process, including agenda setting, stakeholder analysis, and application of policy analysis frameworks. Students also explore the importance of interprofessional collaboration in improving health outcomes through the policy process and advocacy for development and implementation of nursing and healthcare policies in organizations at the local, state, national, and international levels. Students engage in written analyses through which they develop new policies and critically evaluate existing policies though policy analysis frameworks.

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NURS 8110 – Theoretical and Scientific Foundations for Nursing

(5 cr.) In this course, students focus on the integration of scientific, philosophical, and theoretical concepts as the basis for the highest level of nursing practice. They examine the scientific underpinnings for nursing practice, including bio-behavioral, pathophysiological, psychosocial, and environmental sciences, and they explore the interrelationship among knowledge, research, and practice. Students also explore and discuss clinical inquiry, ethical issues, and models of evidence-based practice. Considering various philosophies, students describe their own philosophy of nursing. They also apply course concepts to a variety of practical assignments, including a literature review, concept map, and evaluation of current clinical practice problems, among others.

  • NURS 8200 – Methods for Evidence-Based Practice Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams

    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is the integration of scientific, philosophical, and theoretical concepts as the basis for the highest level of nursing practice. The scientific underpinnings for nursing practice including bio-behavioral, pathophysiological, psychosocial, and environmental sciences are examined. The interrelationship between knowledge, research, and practice is explored. Clinical inquiry, ethical issues, and models of evidence-based practice are presented.

  • NURS 8210 – Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Through Technology

    (5 cr.) When used effectively, information technology can support generation of new knowledge and emerging information technologies. In this course, students examine the critical appraisal and use of information technology in advanced nursing practice. Students work toward gaining the skills and knowledge to process and manage information systems/technology resources in consumer, clinical, and public health settings. Students engage in a variety of discussions and assignments designed to provide practical application of content on topics including retrieval and critical analysis of digital data to support healthcare quality improvement; electronic health records integration and evaluation; and Web-based learning and intervention tools to support and improve patient care. They also explore ethical, regulatory, and legal issues as well as the healthcare standards and principles for selecting and evaluating information systems and patient care technology. Nursing Essay Assignment Discussion Papers, Midterm and Final Exams.

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